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DIARY OF COMING ENGAGEMENTS.

THE TIME AND THE MAN.

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If a correspondent in a northern sporting newspaper is to have his way, a drastic reform will shortly be introduced into football report- ing. This gentleman complains in the columns of Scottish Sport that players and public alike are having their pleasure in football spoilt by the remorseless Press critics. His proposal, as I recently amended, reads thus :— That in order to. eliminate the disastrous results that are likely to. accrue from the continuance of the unlimited licence allowed newspaper reporters, and with a view to confining their sphere of useful- ness to a record of the legitimate events of the game, the extent of the attendance, and the state of the ground and weather, each club shall appoint a Press censorial committee, properly provided with a blue pencil, whose duties shall be to examine the reports ere they are despatched, and satisfy themselves that the said reports contain nothing offensive to any parties interested in the game, or those responsible for the condition of the ground and the state of the weather. We scarcely know whether to take this reformer seriously or not, but as he is a Scotchman, we are bound on the Johnsonian theory to regard y him as incapable of satire. For the sake of the fun that it would create, we wish we could have a trial of this Censorial Committee. Football committees are notoriously quarrelsome, almost more so than the members of musical societies and it would be exceedingly edifying to watch the members fighting over the phraseology of a certain paragraph, or squabbling over the merits of a certain player. The latest sporting edition of the slowest evening paper would have gone to press and the staff to bed before the football committee had decided the point. If the efforts of the Press in giving football clubs and players columns of gratuitous puffs are appreciated so little by the recipients, the best thing would be for the Press to leave the sport severely alone for a season. Hard-working reporters would then have the benefit of a Saturday afternoon half-holiday, the average newspaper reader would get so many more columns of really interesting and instructive matter in his favourite sheet, and the cantankerous footballers would be left to settle their many differences in the sanctity of their own committee-rooms. The man who can invent an absolutely uncapsizable boat would not only be a bene- factor to his species, but, in these days, would be in a fair way towards realising a fortune- Whether our neighbour, Mr. W. H. BRADFORD* of Panton Place, Hoole, is that fortunate per- sonage or not remains to be seen, but he has at all events just patented an invention which seems to fulfil all the requirements. He gave a demonstration with two model boats in the Dee at the Groves on Saturday evening, before a company of local experts, with eminently satisfactory results. Mr. BRADFORD'S patent consists in buoyancy cases, either metallic air-tight, or composed of some buoyant sub- stance. In the open boat model, two of these air-tight metal cases are fixed fore and aft just above the gunwale. In the other model, a cutter yacht, in addition to the two cases at either end of the vessel, a series of long, narrow cases runs alongside the rail, forming a sort of bulwark. These cases are all, of course, clear of the water when the vessel is sailing on an even keel, so that they take no way off the craft. It is only when the gunwale of the boat or ship is depressed unduly that th& air cases come into play, and they are so placed that the more the gunwale is de- pressed the greater the leverage of the cases in righting, the vessel. Both models were sub- jected to the severest tests. They were sailed with the canvas set in a manner most calcu- lated to overturn a boat, and in a strong breeze, but neither of them could be upset. When lifted bodily out of the water and thrust down keel upwards, they righted themselves with astonishing speed,. the manner in which the yacht turned right side uppermost with her two jibs and mainsail all heavy with water affording a remarkable proof of the powerful leverage exercised by the air tight cases. Fitted with these buoyancy cases, a boat—so the inventor claims—could ride out the heaviest gale that blows. One recommendation of the patent is that the cases would be cheap and detachable, also they can be used on any craft, from a punt to a man-of-war. They would be especially serviceable to fishing boats, and considering the loss of life that is annually chronicled on our coasts through the upsetting or foundering of fishing boats, we trust that this new patent may afford a solution of one of the most obstinate nautical problems.

CHESTER CATHEDRAL.

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