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DIARY OF COMING ENGAGEMENTS.

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A IS IT INDOLENCE?

EAST DENBIGHSHIRE.

VOLUNTEERS AS 'SCORCHERS.'

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CHESTER CATHEDRAL.

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Mrs. William Henry Gladstone has gone, with her children, to Scotland, on a visit to her aunt, Dowager Lady Seafield, at Castle Grant, Invernesshire. The Bishop of Chester is suggesting to the incumbents of the diocese that, on some con- venient Sunday, they might with advantage read the Lambeth Encyclical from the pulpit instead of a sermon. A marriage has been arranged, and will shortly take place, between Captain W. H. Salmon, of the 60th Rifles, eldest son of the late Mr. William Percival Salmon, and Ellen, eldest daughter of Sir Edmund and Lady Verney, of Claydon House, Bucks, and Rhianva, Anglesey. The Duke of Sutherland and party, consisting of the Marquis and Marchioness of Ormonde, Lady Beatrice and Lady Constance Butler, Miss Chaplin and Miss Florence Chaplin, Sir W. H. Russell and the Rev. Dr. Joass, of Golspie, arrived at Invergordon on Thursday in the Royal Yacht Squadron's steam yacht Catania from a cruise in the fiords of Norway. The birth of the son and heir to Sir Henry and Lady Robertson was celebrated with great rejoicing at Pale on Wednesday. The village of Llanderfel was decorated for the occasion, and the day's proceedings began with a feu de joie. At noon a number of presentations were made to the infant, for whom they were received by Sir Henry. They included a massive silver inkstand from the tenants on the estate, and a handsome marble timepiece from the workmen. The tenants and friends, to the number of 350, afterwards partook of luncheon, over which Sir Henry presided. PRINCE FRANCIS OF TECK IN THE SOUDAN.—A special correspondent on the way to the Soudan states that news has been received at Suakim that Osman Digna has been ordered to retire for the purpose of reinforcing Mahmoud at Matemmeh. Prince Francis of Teck has arrived at Wady Haifa, and left for the front on Satur- day night. MR. YERBURGH AND BUTTER-MAKING.-Mr Yerburgh, M.P., has offered a number of prizes to butter makers in the Mellor Division, which he represents on the Lancashire County Council. Competitors must have attended Miss Sheedy's classes during the session just closed, and the samples submitted must have been made at home by the pupils themselves, according to the system taught at the classes. MR. GLADSTONE'S JOURNEY TO THE NORTH.— Mr. and Mrs. Gladstone, accompanied by Miss Helen Gladstone and Mr. Armitstead, left Hawarden Castle for Scotland on Monday morning. They drove to Sandycroft Station, where there was a special train awaiting them at 12.10. The train passed slowly through the Chester General Railway Station at 12 23, and proceeded to Crewe, where the saloon in which the distinguished travellers were accommodated was attached to the Scotch mail. There was no demonstration at Chester. Mr. and Mrs. Gladstone are in excellent health, and their stay at Butterstone House, Dunkeld, as the guests of Mr. Armitstead, will probably be of a month's duration. CANON HOPKINS' GOLDEN JUBILEE.—A special correspondent writes:—The many friends of Canon Hopkins in Chester, Shrewsbury, Hyde, Wrexham, and Stockport, will be interested to hear that preparations are just now being made at Wilmslow (Cheshire) to celebrate the golden Jubilee of his priesthood. Canon Hopkins is one of the very oldest priests of the Catholic Church. Upon the establishment of the Welsh Vicariate two years ago Canon Hopkins took charge of the Catholic mission at Wilmslow. The worthy Canon has laboured in Chester, Shrewsbury, Hyde, Stockport, Wrexham, and many other towns during his long connection with the Catholic Church, and he is warmly respected not only by his co-religionists but by all sections. The Canon was a prominent figure at the recent Jubilee rejoicings at Wilmslow He will complete his 80th year in October. A committee has been appointed to make all necessary arrangements for a worthy com- memoration of the unique event. The Bishop of Chester on Saturday unveiled a stained glass window which has been placed in the now Church of St. Augustine, Brinksway, Stockport, to commemorate the incumbency of the first vicar of the parish, the late Rev. Arthur H. Tumour. The Rev. James Henry Chell has vacated the assistant curacy of St. Paul's Church, Bury, of which his father, the late Rev. James Chell, was the vicar until his recent decease. The rev. gentleman intends accepting a similar position at the Church of St. Peter, Heswall, near Chester, under the Rev. T. H. May, the new Rural Dean of Wirral. The secretary of the Chester General Infirmary begs to acknowledge with thanks the receipt of a legacy of X200 (less duty) from the executors of the late Mrs. Blomfield, of Molling- ton Hall, near Chester, per Messrs. Potts, Potts and Gardner, solicitors; also a donation of RI ls. to the Parkgate Convalescent Home from Miss Williams, St. Mark's Vicarage, Connah's Quay. The Duke of Westminster's gift of stained- glass windows for the north and south transepts of St. Paul's Cathedral will shortly be consummated. The windows, which are to commemorate the conversion of England to Christianity, have been designed by Sir W. B. Richmond, and one is actually ready for insertion. It cannot be placed in position at present, however, owing to some constructional difficulty in the stonework frames which has yet to be overcome. As soon as this obstacle is surmounted, the window will be filled in. The other window has not yet been finished, but Sir W. B. Richmond has the work well in hand. PRESENTATION.—Mr. J. A. Davies, of the commercial department of the Courant, has been presented by bis colleagues with a handsome timepiece on the occasion of his marriage to Miss Hannah Plowright, of Rock Ferry. CHOIR PICNIC. The members of the City-road Wesleyan Choir took their out- ing on Wednesday to Llanberis. They left Chester at nine o'clock, and arrived at Llanberis at 12.15 p.m. Snowdon was climbed in glorious weather, and a repast was provided at the Padarn Villa Hotel. The party arrived home at eleven o'clock, all having spent a most enjoyable day. HALITYN DISTRICT MINES DRAINAGE COMPANY. —The 45th ordinary general meeting of the shareholders of this company was held at the offices, Chester, last week, Mr. John Thompson presiding in the absence of the Duke of West- minster. There were also present:—Colonel Howard, the Rev. G. W. Corbet, Messrs. O. Andreasian, William Bailey, C. Davison, Geo. Dutton, Matthew Francis, G. R, Griffith, Jas. Hobday, Edward Hobday, R, E. Langhorne, C. H. Poole, F. E. Roberts, Thomas J. Smith, and F. S. Williams. The directors' report, together with a statement of accounts, was adopted, and a dividend was declared upon the paid-up capital of the company for the half-year at the rate of fifteen per cent per annum. ACCIDENT IN CHESTER. About seven o'clock on Friday evening, as Dr. Henry Dobie's brougham was leaving Abbey Square, the front axle gave way, and, one of the wheela coming off, the vehicle over- turned. Fortunately Dr. Dobie escaped un- hurt, and made his exit by the door on the uppermost side of the carriage. The horad fell, and the coachman was thrown to the ground, but got off with only a bruised elbow. THE DEE SALMON FISHERY.—The salmon, fishing season for this year, except with rod and line, terminates to-day (Wednesday). We regret to say that there has been no improve- ment in the position of the Dee fishermen since attention was called in our columns a few weeks ago to the necessitous circumstances of many of the men. The subscription list published in our advertising columns shews that the appeal for help is making but slow progress. ALTRINCHAM AGRICULTURAL Suow.-Intend- ing exhibitors at this show, which takes place at Altrincham on Thursday, September 23rd, will observe that the entries will close on September 7tb, and finally at double- fees on September 10th. Strict instructions have been given by the committee as to the closing of entries, and it is the intention of the secretary (Mr. Wm. Graham) to adhere to the dates named. Last year, when the closure was applied, there was a record entry all round, although; the society returned over 930 in entrance fees*. CHESTER ROYALTY THEA.Tm.-This week the boards at the City-road Theatre are being occupied by Mr. William Carder's company in Sutton Vane's famous work 'The Span of Life.' The play is intensely dramatic, and abounds in incidents of a most sensational character. The company, too, is a powerful one, and the staging and scenic effects are realistic and excellent. The popular parts of the house- on Monday evening were well filled, and the- play is of such a nature that it is bound to meet with success. For next week the musical comedy, 'Oriental America' is announced. COUNTY COUNCIL ELECTION AT SALE.—The election of Mr. Harry Thornber by the Cheshire County Council as a county alderman caused a vacancy in the representation of Sale. The seat was contested, and the polling took place on Saturday, the candidates being Mr. J. J. Thompson, of The Towers, Brooklands, and Mr. J. Shaw, of Ashton-on-Mersey. Mr. Shaw was the nominee of the Liberal party, while Mr. Thompson, although he elected to assume & non-political attitude, received a very large measure of support from the Conservative part. The result was:—Mr. Thompson, 494; Mr. Shaw, 449; majority, 45. ALLAN LINE EMPLOYES IN CHESTER.—On Saturday the employes in the inward freight department of the Allan Steamship Line at Alexandra Dock, Liverpool, had their sixth annual picnic to Chester, a most enjoyable day being spent. On arrival here by wagonette the company separated for a stroll round the ancient city, after which the excursionists sat down to dinner at the Queen's Head Hotel. Mr. John Martin presided, and the usual loyal and other toasts were duly honoured, the Chairman remarking on the good feeling prevailing in all departments of the firm. The band from the Boys' Refuge, St. Anne-street, Liverpool, accompanied the party, and played pleasing selections at intervals during the day. GROSVENOR MUSE um.-The general public, as well as those interested specially in art, will be glad to learn that the Science and Art Depart- ment have officially notified that they will lend a selection of the works of art of the National Competition for exhibition at the Grosvenor Museum. The collection will be on view from the 6th to the 9th of September, inclusive, free of charge. As the sections are made from the best works submitted by the different art schools throughout the kingdom, we have no doubt the opportunity of viewing these draw- ings will be taken. During the time these works of art are on view, the Grosvenor Museum will be open to the public free of charge. A DEBT COLLECTOR SUSPICNDED.- On Wednes- day, at the Northwich County Court, before his Honour Judge Wynne Ffoulkes, Mary Newton, of Knutsford, appeared in answer to a judg- ment summons, obtained by Aaron Finestone, of Northwich. Peter Roberts, agent for the plaintiff, admitted that he had made out an affidavit, stating that the defendant was in business as a blacksmith. When pressed by the judge, he acknowledged that he had gathered this information from a neighbour. Defendant stated on oath that the affidavit was false. She had not been in business for more than twelve months. The judge informed the agent that he was utterly incapable of making out an affidavit, and would be suspended for an indefinite period until he saw whether the defendant instituted a prosecution for perjury. He would take the same course with, any other agent who misconducted himself. THE CROPS IN CHESHIRE.—A Cheshire corres- pondent writes:—Nearly all the corn has now been cut, and in some districts farmers have just finished the work of stacking. The heavy rains have, of course, interfered with the operations in the fields, but no serious mischief has been caused. The crop is- considere&a, very good one. In some places, however, growers report the yield below the average. Very little rye has been grown this season. There is just now a splendid show of potatoes, but in some of the districts disease has shewn itself.. It is said that the Cheshire supplies will not equal those of previous years. Many of the large farmers have very few acres of potatoes compared with previous years. Fruit is- by no means so plentiful as was the case last season. The farmer's orchard has often paid well in-, past years, but this time scores of farmers have very little fruit of any kind for sale. There is a fair show of apples and pears, but plums and damsons are very scarce. Such a scarcity of this useful fruit has not been known for, many years. CHESTER CALEDONIAN PICNIC.—A most SUC- cessful picnic in connection with this associa- tion came off on Wednesday afternoon. A party of members and their friends, numbering about 60, left the Groves in one of Mr. Capner's steamers- for Almere Fbrry. The weather remained delightfully. bright, warm and dry, notwithstanding the frequent thunder- showers experienced in Chester during the afternoon. The trip up the river was much enjoyed, the time being beguiled by the music of Mr. Marchant's band and vocal contributions from members of the company. The party disembarked at a charming spot a little above Almere Ferry, and here a large marquee was erected for tea, while dancing, quoits, shooting competitions with an air gUD. &c., were engaged in. A knife-and-fork tea was served about five o'clock, after which the amusements were resumed, and the return journey com- menced about eight o'clock. Unfortunately a thick fog enveloped the channel of the river after the Iron Bridge was passed, and some time was spent in negotiating the Crooked Dee, but no mishap occurred, and the party reached the Grovea, voting the picnic a complete success. Great credit is due to the energetic hon. secretary (Staff-Sergeant Jamieson) for the excellence of the arrangements for the enjoyment of the company, a task in which he was seconded by a sub-committee, consisting ofi the president (Mr. James Niven) and Messrs.. J. Burnett, N. C. Firth, G. Millar, J. Simpson. Bathgate, Robert Beck, C. Cooper, and W. Buraess (hon. treasurer). WREXHAM, MOLD, AND CONNAH'S QAAY RAILWAY.—The report of this company for the half-year ending the 30th June shews thai the traffic receipts amounted to X26,728 2s. lid., being a decrease cf £319 12s. 7d., as compared with the corresponding half of last year while the working expenses, amounting to S15,405 16s. 5d., shew an increase of £43 19s. SI. nett receipts Xll,322 6s. 6cl., decrease £ 36313s. Id. The passenger and parcel traffic shew an increase of R.843, but the receipts from merchandise and minerals are less than in the corresponding half-year by £ 1,168, caused by the iopression in the North Wales coal trade. Tha balance op revenue account, after charging the Buckley Railway rent and rent charges,, is sufficient tOl. provide the interest on the A and & debenture stocks, but does act meet the Still amount of interest on thi4 C stock. The balance, which the directors believe wiU be earned in the December ialf-year, has. b«en carried forward. The dittors regret that the working of the North W and Liverpool Rail- way has again, owing t. the causes referred to in the last half-yearly yeport, been unprofitable. The application to tb* Railway Conaaftissioners to compel the Mersey Railway Company to adopt through tookings to the -Sorth Wales and Liverpool Railway, the Cheshire Lines Com- mittee, the Wrexham, Mold, and Connah'a Quay, and other railways reached by thesa systems was heard last month, and an arranl ment come to which, it is hoped, will provide greater facilities to the public, and thus in- crease the receipts of the companies. The Bill promoted by the executors of the late Mr. Pieroy referred to in the last half-yearly report wa-F. rejected by Parliament,