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CITY POLICE COURT.

GREEK GIPSIES IN CHESHIRE.…

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LOCAL FLOWER SHOWS. -6.

PRIMROSE LEAGUE FETE AT GRESFORD.…

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PRIMROSE LEAGUE FETE AT GRESFORD. On Friday afternoon, a fête, under the auspices of the Primrose League, was held at Gresford Vale. In the afternoon sports were held, and in the evening Sir ROBERT E. EGERTON, K.C.S.I., who was at one time Governor of the Punjaub, and Mr. H. St. John Raikes, addressed the gathering. Sir Robert, referring to the troubles on the North-west frontier of India, said he did not think there was any very great cause for alarm. The tribes there were all of a somewhat quarrelsome character. They appeared and disappeared as enemies periodically. One day there were in arms against England, and the next day they enlisted in our army, and were trained to defend our interests. Their hatred of England was of a very uncertain, fluctuating kind. When they had nothing to do, no little quarrels between themselves to attend to, they thought it rather good form to make themselves disagreeable to England thinking perhaps it might not be unprofitable to them to make themselves thus obnoxious in the hope that they would be bought off, and so secure some substantial advantage. There was no coherence among them, and although there were reports of disturbances all along the border, there was nothing to be alarmed at, for they were local disturbances, and not part of a general outbreak. In fact, he had no doubt that they would very shortly hear of these unruly tribes being completely pacified, and order thoroughly restored all along the North-west frontier. (Applause.) As to what had taken place in Bombay, he was not in a position to speak with the same authority, but he believed that the disturbances there were mere passing ebullitions, and that the measures which had been taken to check the seditious writings of certain people on the theme would have the desired effect. (Applause.) He thought that these people who endeavoured to stir up trouble were quite unable to appreciate the condition under which the people of India lived at the present day, as compared with remoter times; and that their attempts to make people dissatisfied with British rule must prove abortive. Besides, the number of people who read these seditious writings was very limited. The newspaper in which these writings appeared were not, as in England, widely cir- culated, and generally read, but were, on the contrary, scarcely circulated at all, and were read by a very small proportion of the vast population of India. (Applause.) Mr. RAIKES, alluding to the last session of Parliament, said it had not been a sensational one, but the Government had gone in for domestic legislation, and done what they could to benefit the workingmen and women-the poorer classes generally of this country. Even Mr. Asquith had admitted that in passing the Workmen's Compensation Bill, the Government bad created a greater and more peaceful revolu- tion in industrial affairs than even the Liberals in the plenitude of their power, and when they had the country at their back were able to do. (Applause.) Respecting the situation in Turkey and Greece, he said they could all rest perfectly satisfied that Lord Salisbury would uphold the honour of England, of which they were all so proud.

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' LEST WE FORGET.'"

THE 'PALM' TREE.

FINDING WATER BY DIVINATION.

LANCASHIRE'S ENCROACHMENT.

-----THE ANNEXATION OF THE…

.— NATIONAL FEDERATION OF…

* CHESTER FOOTBALL CLUB.

♦— MARFORD HILL AS A RACING…

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