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CITY POLICE COURT.

GREEK GIPSIES IN CHESHIRE.…

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LOCAL FLOWER SHOWS. -6.

PRIMROSE LEAGUE FETE AT GRESFORD.…

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' LEST WE FORGET.'"

THE 'PALM' TREE.

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THE 'PALM' TREE. Sir,—Some of your numerous readers-and among those who peruse the very old- established successor to and continuation of Adams's Weekly Courant there must be not a few who are interested in matters antiquarian —will doubtless be able to inform me whether, in any parts of Cheshire, Shropshire, or the English-speaking portions of Denbighshire and Montgomery, the Common Yew (Taxus baccata) is, or (so far as can be ascertained) ever has been, known as the Palm' tree. In Kent and Surrey it was so called until comparatively recent times, and, as a contributor to the great English Dialect Dictionary (University Press, Oxford) I am anxious to ascertain if this nomenclature obtains elsewhere, the more especially in the locality above-mentioned. And for this reason:—the 'palm' tree is to be, seen very generally along all the Pilgrim's' or' Palmer's' ways in the South of England; and since, in mediaeval days, Irish pilgrims to the shrine of our Kentish St. Thomas of Canter- bury seem to have sailed up the estuary of the Dee, landed at Chester, and proceeded London- wards along the ancient Watling Street, it becomes matter of antiquarian and linguistic interest to know if the old name has survived in the north-west as well as in the south-east of England. The yew seems to have been, par excellence, the favourite tree of those who made pilgrimage to Canterbury; a branch of it, a Canterbury brooch' and a Thomas's watter-bottle' were, indeed, the three marks of having made pilgrimage to Beckett's shrine, and it is small wonder that the tree dear to the palmer became known as the p-alm tree along many of the routes he took. The very old folk, in remote districts hereabout, still keep the name, while more than one Kentish inn known as the Palm Tree' has (or had) a Yew' for its sign. Is it also retained in any districts in the counties I have mentioned above ? I have been told so, and if, through your columns, you will allow me to ask for information in proof or disproof of the usage, you will, I am sure, render a favour not only to myself but to our Editor (the Deputy-Professor of Compara- tive Philology at Oxford) and to students of English local linguistics and dialect generally. As a purely antiquarian question, too, the query is not without interest.—I am, sir, your obedient servant, ALFRED MooRB. B.A. Eythorne, Kent, August 20th, 1897. —

FINDING WATER BY DIVINATION.

LANCASHIRE'S ENCROACHMENT.

-----THE ANNEXATION OF THE…

.— NATIONAL FEDERATION OF…

* CHESTER FOOTBALL CLUB.

♦— MARFORD HILL AS A RACING…

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