Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

17 articles on this Page

Advertising

FLINTSHIRE STANDING JOINT…

[No title]

Advertising

THE HARVEST.

News
Cite
Share

THE HARVEST. During the past week a good deal of rain has fallen locally—very heavily at times—but har- vesting has proceeded at intervals, although necessarily but slowly. The land has now had the thorough soaking so long desired, and fine weather is much needed, not only for the in- gathering of the corn crops but for the second seeds aftermath, the cutting of which has commenced in many places. Of course it goes without saying that the roots are taking all the benefit of the rains, but many pastures remain brown and the herbage extremely short, especially where stock-keepers have been doing all they can to save their reserves. The hot wave has passed away apparently all over the British Isles, to the great relief, in a sense, of field workers; but it is to be hoped that another month at least of fine weather is open to us. In the South of England the white straw crops are nearly all stacked, and grain-cutting has become general in the North and in Scot- land, the crops proving better than was at one time anticipated. The recent hay harvest, according to reports, works out at between 29 and 30cwt. per acre, Scotland being above and England and Wales not far below the average. Last year the general average for the whole country was only about 21cwt. From the cheese markets reports are to the effect that there has been large buying at Liverpool during the week both by consumers and dealers. American advices coming very strong, with higher quotations, while the official report from London states that advices from the other side give a strong tone to the market, at about lB. per cwt. over the prices of the previous week. Following the lead of the Leeds millers the Chester bakers advanced the price of bread a halfpenny a loaf. A GENERAL VIEW. The Mark Lane Express says :—Wheat is now generally regarded as being fully equal to the yield which we mentioned as probable a fort- night ago, bare estimates then current in some quarters having been modified as fresh reports came in. The barley crop is very irregular, but it is now thought that the north and west will have so good a yield of oats that the short yield of that cereal in the south and south-east will be fully atoned for. Reports of oats from East Anglia and Lincolnshire are extremely conflict- ing. Near the coast, however, the crop appears to be generally poor, while inland and especially all about the Fens very heavy yields are locally expected. In France the wheat harvest is now over, even Picardy, Artois, and Brittany having carried their sheaves. The yield is put at only two quarters per acre, which on 16 million acres would be 33 million quarters. This is below the July estimates, but the threshings are so uniformly disappointing that some excellent judges do not hesitate to declare that even 33,000,000 have not been reached. The German wheat crop, when contrasted with the French, is regarded as satisfactory, but it is only on this comparison that satisfaction can accrue. the total yield not being expected to come within a million quarters of that of last year. Austria-Hungary will be almost self-supporting in the ensuing season, but will have nothing to spare for export. The price of Hungarian flour has risen as a result of this, and the trade between England and Hungary for the next twelve months seems destined to be extremely small. Russia reports a wheat crop somewhat, but not seriously under average. Fuller news from this great empire is awaited with interest. The American wheat crop of 1897 is estimated by the Balticists as about 550,000,000 bushels, but the latest bureau report would suggest a lower figure. English wheat during the past week has been exported to Fra nee, a circumstance suggesting the 18th rather than the 19th century. Of course the quantities have been small. None the less the tact is curious. THE IRISH POTATO CROP. Perhaps one of the worst features in the harvest outlook up to the present is the partial and in some cases almost the entire failure of the potato crop in some parts of Ireland. According to official reports the crops along the sea-coast have been attacked in many places, while in the interior there is widespread disease. The blight has been scattered over a large area. Some townlands have escaped, so far, com- pletely, but in other places the entire crop has been destroyed. From the West *of Ireland the latest accounts are to the effect that there is far from a hopeful outlook. This particu- larly applies to Belmullet and the congested districts. A letter has been received by one of the officials of the Con- gested Districts Board in Dublin, from Father Hegarty, a parish priest in Mayo, who states that so far as present appearances go, either general relief or general want will pre- vail in Erris before the year goes by. Some potatoes are wretchedly small, many of them black, and some rotten." At Inniskea, where there has been an outbreak of fever, Dr. Jordan, who was sent to assist the local authorities, has contracted the fever, and his place has been taken by Dr. Ensor, who was despatched from Dublin on Saturday evening. Along the eastern coast the potatoes have turned out well, and this is also the case in most of the the midland counties. From Limerick and Clare the reports are not satisfactory, the declaration being made that the crops will be the worst experienced for many years. The weather continues to be damp and very warm, so that the conditions are altogether against a good crop of the chief food of a very large number of the peasantry of Ireland. If the weather changed even now, there would be some chance of avoiding what appears pro- bable, a time of considerable difficulty during the coming winter for the peasantry in the West of Ireland. PURE CULTURE IN BUTTER-MAKING. The use of pure cultures in butter-making has lately been the subject of a series of expe- riments at the Storrs Agricultural Station in America, and the following conclusions have been come to: The cream in ordinary creameries or dairies always contains bacteria, a large majority of which are perfectly wholesome, and which are perfectly consistent with the pro- duction of the best quality of butter. It sometimes happens, however, that a dairy or creamery becomes impregnated with a species of bacteria that grows rapidly and produces an ill effect upon the milk. This infection may be due to a single cow, but it is usually impossible for the farmer to discover the source. On the other hand creameries and dairies will in many cases be supplied with bacteria giving rise to desirable flavours, aromas, and a proper amount of acid. June is the most favourable month, simply because the variety of bacteria is greater at this time. If cream be inoculated with an abundant culture of some particular kind of bacteria, this species will frequently develop so rapidly as to check the, growth of the other bacteria present, and thus, perhaps, prevent them from producing their natural effects. Hence, it follows that the use of 'starters' will commonly give rise to favourable results, even though the cream may already be some- what largely impregnated with other species of bacteria before the inoculation with the artifi- cial starter. This fact lies at the basis of the use of artificial starters. CLEANLINESS IN MILKING. The sources of germs in milk (says a writer in Farm and Home) are dust and dirt from whatsoever source, coming in contact with the milk, whether it be from soured milk already in the pail, dirty or impure washing water, dirt from .the clothing of the milkers, drippings from their hands, or filth particles falling from the udder and sides of the animal. Improper methods of milking and caring for the milk while in the houses, in most part, are answer- able for malodorous, ill-tasting, poor-keeping milk. One cannot expect a good quality of milk from foul-smelling, ill-kept stables, at which the man-of.all-work does the milking, with the same unwashed hands that have per- formed previous stable work, or from another in which the horses receive all the grooming and currying, and the cow is never brushed. It is of great economic importance before I the work of milking begins that both the cow and the milker should be as neat as possible. No amount of care in these points, however, will be worth much if the pails are allowed to stand in the cowhouses before and after milking. FARMERS, MAKE A NOTE. A serious case of cow poisoning has been reported to the authorities at Fort-William. It appears that the proprietor of the Inver- loehy estate, in repairing an old road running between Corriechoillie and Laraig, ordered a quantity of weed-destroyer to be sprinkled over the grass at the roadside in order to save cutting. A number of cows belonging to Mr. Aitken, Speanbridge, and William M'Intosh, Corrie- choillie, which graze on the enclosed pasture had, owing to the want of gates, strayed on to this old road and eaten the grass at the road- side, with the result that five of them died I and two more became very ill. THE VALUE OF RAPE. In many parts of the country the value of rape does not appear to be properly appreciated, says a writer in the Farmer and Stockbreeder. Its cultivation is easy and inexpensive, and both for full-grown sheep and lambs its value for fattening purposes is considerable. It can be grown upon soils of the most diverse character, but one rich in humus or decayed vegetable matter has given the best results. In the States early spring sowing, either broadcast or in drills about 30in. apart, is practised. It is there used as a fodder crop for cutting, and it is cut about two months after being sown and if the stalks are left about four inches high, two more cuttings can be had from the same plant. In this way it can advantageously be given to cows and fatting bewsts during August and September, when graiWis short. It is also said to be a valuable food for swine, and the sum- marised results of the swine-feeding experiment shew that the value of one acre of rape is equal in value to 2,7671b. of grain, which, taken at 601b. per bushel, equals 46'7 bushels. A NEW CHURN. A new churn possessing many points of practical utility which cannot fail to recommend themselves to the dairy worker, has been in- vented by Mr. J. C. Lloyd, son of the late Mr. Charles Lloyd, cooper, of 23, Water- gate-row, south, Chester. The churn is an improved over-end barrel, and one of the principal advantages claimed for it is that the lid, instead of being made to merely fit in or on the top, as is the case in the majority of instances, comprises a portion of the churn itself, and when removed and turned up forms a most substantial tub for washing the butter: It is claimed for this arrangement that the lid and the churn itself can be more thoroughly cleansed than in the case of some others that are fitted with a metal rim, which is apt to get loose from the woodwork and so present crevices from which it is difficult to dislodge stale cream. The lid of the churn under notice closes upon a rubber rim which can be easily removed for cleaning purposes. Of course the churn may be made to any size, and the inventor and manufacturer is willing to permit a trial before purchase to responsible persons. Dairymen on the look out for a thoroughly practical churn and tub combined should inspect Mr. Lloyd's new design.

:CHESHIRE AGRICULTURAL SHOW.

THE ALLOTMENT QUESTION.

[No title]

Advertising

WILL OF COL. WILLIAM BLACKBURNE.…

JUBILEE CELEBRATION AT INCE.…

WELSH DISTRICT OF NATIONAL…

THE ROYAL VISIT TO IRELAND.…

Cbe Armp anb Foluntecro.

Advertising

[No title]

Advertising