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INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION AT CONNAH'S…

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A NESTON HERO. ♦

,FUNERAL OF THE BISHOP OF…

THE VERDIN TECHNICAL SCHOOLS…

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SUPERSTITION IN MATRIMONY.…

DIVORCE COURT REVELATIONS.…

CARBOLIC ACID POISONING. ♦

AUCTION SALES. -

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CONVINCING PROOF OF THE EFFICACY…

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MR. W. S. B. M'LAREN AND THE…

THE OLD LOVE AND THE NEW.

MARRYING AN AUNT. 4

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MARRYING AN AUNT. 4 STRANGE COMPLICATIONS. At the London Bankruptcy Court, on Wed- nesday, the case of A. B. Creeke, the younger, came on for hearing, the debtor being a solicitor who, since February, 1894, had prac- tised at various addresses in London. About 1883 he married a lady who was (erroneously, as it afterwards appeared) supposed to be a widow. There was one daughter issue of the marriage. The lady subsequently learned that her husband was in fact alive, and she and the bankrupt thereupon separated. The insolvency was ascribed to the debtor's liability under a deed of covenant into which he had entered for the payment of JE1 a week for the maintenance of his daughter. Being unable to keep up the payments, the lady (the mother ot the child) presented the petition on which the receiving order was founded. The Official Receiver reported that the assets were not sufficient for the payment of 10s. in the pound. The senior official receiver said that since the filing of his report he had received an offer of JE20 for the estate. The liabilities, about L500, represented the bankrupt's liability under the deed of covenant.—Mr. Bartley Dennis appeared for the petitioning creditor, and opposed the application on various grounds. Mr. Lincoln Reed represented the bankrupt.—Mr. Dennis urged that the object of the bankruptcy was to get rid of the liability under the deed.—The Registrar: You can hardly allege that when your client brought the bankruptcy about. (Laughter.)—Mrs. Ledgard was called, and stated that in 1883, believing then that she was a widow, she married the bankrupt. They separated in 1887 on learning that her husband was alive. In October, 1891, Mr. Creeke executed a deed in her favour, covenanting to pay JE1 a week for the sup- port of their daughter, and he then married again. In 1895 another deed was executed in substitution for the one of October, 1891. Since December, 1895, she had only received -911 from the bankruDt under the deed executed in that year.—On cross-examination by Mr. Lincoln Reed, the witness said that her husband was the bankrupt's uncle. She believed when she married the bankrupt that her husband was not alive. He had then left her for five years.-Mr. Lincoln Reed: You were 10 years older than the bankrupt when you married him. Did you not then tell him that your husband was dead P—Mrs. Ledgard asserted that the bankrupt had as much knowledge of the subject as herself, and she declined to be cross-questioned in this way.—Mr. Lincoln Reed: When you married you were 33 and he only 23 years of age, and it may therefore be assumed that you had considerable influence over the bankrupt.—The Official Receiver said he hoped that the time of the Court would not be con&umed in threshing out a private quarrel. Mr. Lincoln Reed said his object was to shew that there had been no moral turpitude on the bankrupt's part, and that he had done all in his power to support his daughter. He would not, however, go any further into the personal matters. It appeared that the bankrupt had paid upwards of X500 for the benefit of the child, and it was submitted, so far as he was concerned, that the case was one of misfortune. It was his intention to act as fairly as he had acted in the past.—Ultimately the discharge was granted on the bankrupt consenting to a judgment for L300 to be set aside out of his future earnings. I

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