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BUCKLEY MAN CONDEMNED TO DEATH.

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BUCKLEY MAN CONDEMNED TO DEATH. It is stated that Thomas Lloyd, the con- demned criminal waiting in Walton Gaol, the death sentence passed upon him at the last Liverpool assizes, for the murder of his wife, was born at Buckley, where his parents for a time resided. His father was Thomas Lloyd, a boilermaker, who generally obtained employment at various collieries and other works in North Wales. The unhappy man now in Walton Prison was his illegitimate son. The father left Wales owing to some family disagreement and went to Belfast where he got employment in the Soho Foundry. The condemned criminal was educated at Buckley, where he Jived with his mother,and when a young man attended Sunday school there, and seems to have borne a good character. Subsequently he joined his father at Belfast, and there served his time as a boilermaker at the Soho Foundry. Afterwards, on his father's death', the young man married, came to England, and worked at his trade as boilermaker in Manchester, Hull, Barrow, and Liverpool. Latterly he seems to have fallen into intemperate habits, and it is believed that during the fatal quarrel with his wife he became exasperated by being taunted by her with his illegitimacy. It seems that the Boilermakers' Society, a powerful organisa- tion, is divided into a number of lodges, and the unfortunate man was a member of the trades organisation. A levy is made of a small sum in the Boilermakers' Union for the assist- ance of members who may get into trouble, and who it is considered desirable to help. It is explained that the reason why this help was not extended to Lloyd on his trial arose from the fact that he shifted his lodges, and had no claim of help from any particular branch. It is believed, however, that his fellow-workmen may make an effort to approach the Home Secretary to obtain a commutation of the capital sentence. It is stated that Lloyd's mother subsequently married a respectable man named Sheppard, that she bad a family by him, and that some of the accused's half-brothers and sisters are alive, and are resident and in a fairly good position near Chester. There is a belief that when this fact becomes known that the unhappy wretch, who up to the present point seems to have been without friends or anyone to make an effort to avert his sad fate, may from his relatives obtain the aid in which he so sorely stands in need. Lloyd is a Protestant, and his spiritual condition is being looked after by the Pro- testant chaplain at Walton Gaol. The murder took place at Tillard-street, off Stanley-road, Liverpool, on June 19th. The execution is fixed for to-day (Wednesday). INTERVIEW WITH THE PRISONER. RESIGNED TO HIS FATE. On Wednesday prisoner was visited by his stepson, John Seddon, and his wife, Ada Seddon. They were separated from prisoner by the usual double grating. Lloyd was in charge of two warders. On perceiving his relatives he became prostrated with grief, and wept bitterly, burying his face in his hands. A painful interlude ensued, and the visitors themselves were so much overcome at the sight of the unfortunate man in such a terrible position that they for several moments were incapable of speech. The painful silence was broken by Seddon asking Lloyd how he was keeping up. Upon hearing his stepson's voice, Lloyd at once recovered self-possession, and throughout the rest of the interview was perfectly calm and collected. In reply to the question, Lloyd said he never felt better in health in his life, but he added, My mind is troubled. My life has been sworn away." Seddon assured Lloyd that his case should be brought under the notice of the authorities. I will," he said, write up to the Home Secretary, and try to do something on your behalf." "All right, Jack," observed Lloyd, "but I am resigned to my fate." "Life is sweet, though, Tom," remarked Seddon. "It is, Jack," said Lloyd, but look at the life afterwards (referring to penal servitude). Well," said Seddon, I will write a letter to the Home Secretary, and give an account of the life you lived with her during the last 16 years. She was a very bad-tempered woman, and always aggravating you, and making your life miserable. She was always getting drink, and throwing things at you. But, had she recovered from her injuries, she would have been the first to have tried to have got you off." Lloyd, however, did not appear to exhibit much anxiety as to the Home Secretary being approached in his behalf. I am quite ready to go now your mother is gone, Jack," he said, I am quite prepared, for my fate." He then added, with some emotion, "This day week I shall be gone. My life has been sworn away." Then, in tones of despair, he exclaimed I haven't a friend in the world." Is there nobody, Tom," said Seddon. I think I have some nieces, but I don't know where they are." Seddon then asked him if he would like to see his (Seddon's) children. No- it would onlv unset me." Llovd remarked. -of ed. Upon the expiration of the time allowed for the interview, Lloyd took an affectionate fare- well of Seddon and his wife. The stepson urged Lloyd to keep his spirits up. A reprieve," he said, might come yet." Lloyd bid them Good-bye," and as they withdrew burst into tears. The stepson, John Seddon, who has the appearance of being a respectable working man, informed a Press representative that he had delayed visiting his relative until Wednesday in the hope that the Boilermakers' Society would have taken the matter up, and have petitioned the Home Secretary on behalf of the condemned man. It pained him very much to see Lloyd in this awful position, because he was a good husband, and would do anything for his deceased wife, even to cleaning up the house when she was unwell. He was, in fact, as good as gold. Although the deceased was his mother, O-JJ _L_J al.A 1. J i-~ »J :±. oeauon ruiuar&BU tunu no wtw uuuuu IN auuiiu that she frequently gave way to fits of passion, and often aggravated her husband by acts of violence. Twelve months prior to her death she drank heavily. She sub-let her house to the wives of seafaring men, and upon the return of the husbands of these women from sea there were always carousals of prolonged duration, in which the deceased woman par- ticipated. While this drinking was going on Lloyd was frequently a teetotaller. Seddon expressed the earnest hope that a reprieve would be granted, seeing that the crime had been committed while Lloyd was in a drunken frenzy. THE PETITIONS FOR A REPRIEVE. NO WORD FROM THE HOME SECRETARY. Some 1,500 signatures in favour of a reprieve were given on Monday at Mr. Quilliam's office in Manchester-street, making over 11,000 sent from his office. Over 1,000 signatures have gone up to London from Rhyl, some being those of town councillors. About 200 signatures were obtained from among the members of the Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Church, Everton, after service on Sunday night. Mr. Quilliam has received letters from all parts of the immediate country, the writers of which speak highly of the character of the condemned man. Numerous telegrams from private individuals asking the Home Secretary to advise a reprieve were despatched yesterday. No word had been received from the Home Secretary up to a late hour on Monday night. The execution is fixed to take place this Wednesday morning. THE TESTIMONY OF AN OLD FRIEND- Hannah Lewis, wife of Edward Lewis, Main- road, Buckley, made a special journey to Liver- pool and called upon Mr. Quilliam to try and assist in the efforts being made to obtain a reprieve for Lloyd. She made a statement on oath to the solicitor to the effect that she was sixty-five years of age, and had known Lloyd for forty-five years. He had always held an irre- proachable character prior to his marriage with the deceased. He was quite an inoffensive man, and Mrs. Lewis had never heard of his raising his hand to anyone. He was a sober man until several years after his marriage with the deceased, and was also hardworking and industrious. She believed him incapable of committing such a terrible crime as wilful murder. This statement Mr. Quilliam despatched to the Home Secretary last night. Mrs. Lewis obtained a magistrate's order, and visited Lloyd on Monday.

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