Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

26 articles on this Page

CITY POLICE COURT.

ARTILLERY INSPECTION AT CHESTER.…

' DORCAS' AT THE ROYALTY.…

[No title]

CHESTER BOARD OF GUARDIANS.…

[No title]

EMPLOYMENT IN CHESHIRE AND…

ENGLISH V. DANISH MILK. 0

News
Cite
Share

ENGLISH V. DANISH MILK. 0 The following letter appeared in the Man- chester Guardian:-For a considerable period certain individuals have been making state- ments to the prejudice of milk, as produced in England. They first told us of the numerous diseases produced by germs in cows' milk, either inferring or stating that these germs originated with the cow. When they found this untenable they returned to the attack, characterising our milk as dirty. The medical officer of health of this city had on exhibition, on at least one occa- sion, a specially selected sample to illustrate this condition, and he drew a lurid picture of the filthy surroundings of our dairy cows-a condition of things which, with a much larger experience in such matters, I say is not found, save in remote and poor districts, and not oftener than once in a thousand cases. These sanitarians and public philanthropists have a ready-made plan for making our milk supply all that it ought to be; it is the adoption of the Danish (the Copenhagen) method. Dr. Niven and others who have spent a few days in Denmark and visited the show dairies and creameries, and obtained their data from the officials of milk companies, tell us that the system is all that can be desired. Let us see what their opinion is worth. Mr. Speir, a member of the Royal Commission on Tuberculosis, and who has recently spent some time in Denmark,says: The dairy stocks" there are as a rule kept under the most de- plorable sanitary conditions, tuberculosis of a generalised and very virulent type, being exceedingly prevalent, and the wells for the water supply to the farm households and live stock, as well as for washing the butter, in three cases out of every four were within a dozen yards of the dungsteads," where fluid could drain from them into the water supply. This condition existed at the farm where butter was made for the King of Denmark, and 75 per cent. of these supply wells, he says, are little better than urine pots." To thoroughly verify the statement the North British Agriculturist sent a special" to investigate. He not only confirms Mr. Speir's statements, but shows that the con- dition of things is under rather than over- drawn. He tells us that "sanitation in any sense as regards cattle is either unknown or never practised," except in a few show places. A few of these were held up to the delighted vision of Dr. Niven and his friends as the general condition in Denmark. The milk," the special" tells us, is produced under de- plorable conditions. Cows are crowded together as close as possible. The byres" (cow- sheds) "are low in ceiling, and light and air are blocked out overhead by fodder, on which the cows are subsequently fed; the floors are cobble-stones, the interstices filled with liquid and solid excrement, the first soaking deep into the ground. Everything in the byres is in a filthy condition, and the same term applies to the operation of milking." The milk," we are told, is run through a fine BIAVA. noon leaving a. thick. pastv deposit of filth, through which the later portion of the milk slowly percolates." Dr. Niven would have us copy the Danish system. I ask, should we gain by it ? Within the last few months I have examined a good number of dairies supplying the Manchester milk trade. I have, among other things, seen the cows milked, watched the sieving and cooling, and I tell those who have formulated the extraordinary statements as to filthy milk that it is an invention. Almost all milk before coming to Manchester is not only sieved, but run through very fine muslin, and although I have seen the milk of 50 cows passed through, the whole of the sediment from 30 to 50 cows in its fluid state would not more than fill a tablespoon, and was not of that sickening character described in connection with Danish milk. Out of the number of farms visited, only in two was there the slightest risk of water contamination, and this when mentioned was at once changed.— Yours, &c., W. G. L. A. Cox, M.R.C.V.S.L., Consulting V.L.M.S. and S.D. Dairy Society.

[No title]

Advertising

BUCKLEY MAN CONDEMNED TO DEATH.

[No title]

THE NORTH WALES SLATE TRADE.…

DISTRICT AND PARISH COUNCILS.…

WHAT 'THE WORLD' SAYS. ol

[No title]

[No title]

"--''-'''oJ'f,...,'-',",/"/,-"""'''''F'f''''''''…

LANCASHIRE ENCROACHMENT.

WATER FINDING BY THE DIVINING…

A BREEZE ON THE BENCH. 0-

WEEKLY STATE OF THE CHESTER…

Advertising

Family Notices

Advertising

[No title]