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CITY POLICE COURT.

ARTILLERY INSPECTION AT CHESTER.…

' DORCAS' AT THE ROYALTY.…

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CHESTER BOARD OF GUARDIANS.…

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CHESTER BOARD OF GUARDIANS. + — A meeting was held yesterday (Tuesday), Mr. J. Pover presiding over a small attendance. THE PAUPER S BANKING ACCOUNT. It will be remembered that the man named Reece, of Dodleston, had been in receipt of relief from the guardians for several years, and lately it was found that he had a sum of £80 in the savings bank. He was prosecuted before the magistrates for defrauding the guardians and fined. The Bench expressed the opinion that the guardians should attempt to come to some agreement with Reece as to refunding some of the money.—The Clerk said he had had an interview with Reece, and he was glad to say that the man had agreed to pay L7 down. OFFICIALS' SALARIES. A letter was received from Elijah Baker, a male assistant in the imbecile ward, asking that in consideration of his 12 months' service, his salary should be increased. His present salary is,220 per annum.—The Clerk said that some of the other officers were on a sliding scale.—Mr. Hallmark thought they should all be on the same footing.—Mr. Vernon said Mr. Baker was one of their best officers. He ;had over 20 imbeciles under his care, and the post was an important one. He more than earned his wages.—On the proposition of Mr. Kennedy, seconded by Mr. Wedgwood, the matter was deferred till the next meeting. THE PRICE OF GAS. An intimation was received from the Chester Gas Company to the effect that the Union would be supplied in future with gas on the same terms as outsiders. Through the reduction in the price, gas would be supplied at 2s. lid. per thousand cubic feet. MISSING LETTERS STRANGE DISCOVERY. The Clerk said it had come to his knowledge that numerous letters addressed to the Institution had been missing for some time. Most of these unreceived letters had contained postal orders and stamps. The Master reported to him that this was the doing of a boy inmate of the house, whose duty it was to go to the Post Office with the letter bag. He (the clerk) had spoken to the boy, who admitted that for a considerable time past he had been putting his hand into the letter bag, taking letters, and opening those which he thought contained any stamps and muney orders, and taking these out. He (the clerk) bad learned that many letters sent to him and the Board had not been received.—Mr. Vernon: Have you found whether any one else is impli- cated in this matter ?—The Clerk: We suspect so, but it is hard to find out. I was told of this mat- ter, otherwise I had not the slightest suspicion. The Master (Mr. Turner) said that a postal order for 3s. 6d. sent to an inmate of the house was never received, and altogether the sum of 16s. 6d. had been missing in money orders, abstracted from the bag. He should think the practice had been going on for five or six weeks.—A member: What a fortunate thing it has been found out. The Master: I asked the boy where he got these orders changed. He said he took them to the branch office in Foregate-street, and there changed them. On one order for 3s. 6d. he had forged a signature. The Master then detailed other cases, where money sent to inmates of the house by post had been abstracted from the bag by the boy. The lad was called into the room and questioned. He admitted that he had com- mitted these actions entirely on his own sugges- tion. It was his own conception, and he had kept it a secret.—Mr. Wedgwood: I have heard that this boy has not been keeping the best of company.—The Clerk: I am afraid the only way to get at his feelings is by the use of the birch rod. (Hear, hear.) He thought the Board should not have allowed the lad to carry these letters. It was a difficult matter to deal with him.—The master said the idea of the birch rod was put aside on consideration of the boy's age (16). If they took him before the magistrates they would have a difficulty in gaining the case for want of witnesses.—The matter was held over till the next meeting, for the purpose of obtaining more information. THE FISHING CRISIS IN HANDBRIDGE. The Rev. H. Grantham said they had heard for some time of the intense destitution among the fishing population of Handbridge, but he did not think there was that great amount of starvation supposed to exist. He bad heard that applications had been made to the House for relief, but he might say that he had not been applied to for assistance. He did not think there was positive starvation among the fishing people. The Relieving Officer (Mr. Harrop) said there had been no unusual applications made to him for relief from that neighbourhood.

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EMPLOYMENT IN CHESHIRE AND…

ENGLISH V. DANISH MILK. 0

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BUCKLEY MAN CONDEMNED TO DEATH.

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THE NORTH WALES SLATE TRADE.…

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WHAT 'THE WORLD' SAYS. ol

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LANCASHIRE ENCROACHMENT.

WATER FINDING BY THE DIVINING…

A BREEZE ON THE BENCH. 0-

WEEKLY STATE OF THE CHESTER…

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Family Notices

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