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- OUR LONDON CORRESPONDENT.

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NEWS NOTES.

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NEWS NOTES. GREAT admiration has been generally dis- played with regard to the strong and dignified demeanour of Lord Roberts in his conduct of the campaign in South Africa, and especially in respect of the way in which the old Field Mar- shal has acted since he came to closa quarters with Commandant Cronje in the Orange Free State. He has been the soldier and the gentle- man, playing a confident part. all through, as opposed to a brave and irascible officer fighting for a falling cause. THE envelopment of Cronje, after his having been driven from strong positions, was fine strategic work; the repulse of his attempted reinforcements in detail, admirable. Buller's fierce fighting in the difficult country between Colonso and Ladysmith has helped Lord Roberts materially. He has kept the bulk of the Boers of Joubert's army away from ren- dering the Free Staters assistance, and he has heartened" White in Ladysmith much. Losses have been great on both our side and that of the enemy, because immense deter- mination has been conspicuously displayed, but the battling differs materially from what it was when the Boers chose all their positions, and had a fighting force in the field immensely preponderant to that which the British autho- rities considered sufficient to face them with. LORD ROBERTS'S business-like despatches, ignoring unnecessary detail and simply telling so much of the plain battle-tale as would in no way render aid to the enemy, have disappointed some at home athirst for news: but there can be no questioning the wisdom of the action of the Commander-in-Chief at the front. We must be patient and trustful, relying on the authori- ties to notify us of reliable particulars at the earliest point consistent with propriety. Matters have a rosier aspect than has before been apparent, and Time and right are on our side. We expect shortly to have good reason for abiding gratification. COMPLAINTS come again of the use of explo- sive and soft-nosed bullets on the Boer part, and of the enemy's having employed, moreover, bullets steeped in some corrosive or poisonous solution. This kind of thing greatly—and not unnaturally—enrages Tommy Atkins," and it will be the fault of the Boers themselves if they do not receive consideration at his hands in the storm and stress of battle. The Boers are brave enough, but their shiftiness and cunning rather outrages our ideals of what is correct in warfare. THE casualties to officers continue to be con- siderable. The wounding of General Mac- donald and General Knox was followed quickly by the wounding of General Wynne and, then, the death of gallant Captain de Montmorency, the splendid scout who won the coveted V.C. out in the Soudan eighteen months ago, is deeply deplored. We are losing some of the fine flower of the army out in Africa; but such things must be where fighting is. IT would indeed seem little less than a wonder that Kimberley should have been able to hold out so long and so gallantly against siege. There were not more than 600 regular soldiers in the garrison of the Diamond City, and towards the close of the weary and galling four months' investment the disease became rampant and supplies of every description ran shockingly short. No less than 217 of the in- habitants of Kimberley died a miserable death from scurvy alone during January and all the weakly little ones succumbed. Whe the full tale of this war and its consequences comes to be told it will make moving reading. WE are to have the Shah of Persia in Europe again shortly, and he will favour this country with a visit. It is to be hoped that the outcome of his Imperial Highness's enlarged knowledge of the West will be beneficial to his own country and to the trade of the nation he is in friendly relationship with. There is plenty of room for new commercial developments in the Land of the Lion and the Sun." A SPELL of milder weather has succeeded the snow and the storms which recently swept over the country, and already the aspect of Nature shows signs of change. With Marcfc the buds begin to swell, and the grass grows greener as the days lengthen. Should all go seasonably now we shall have some fine days soon and some pleasant foretaster of the Spring-tide that comes nearer. The song of the birds increases in volume, especially in the early tjaornings; and dreary old King Winter, though he may give us some blows before he gpes out, has got his power broken.

ARTISTIC COPYRIGHT.

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ENGLISH ACTORS IN SOUTH AFRICA.

NOTED CRIMINAL ESCAPES.

LAST YEAR'S TRADE PROSPERITY.

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AIT INTERESTING WILL SUIT.

THE LATE SIR JAMES PAGET.

MUSICAL BOX IN A RING.

THE AUXILIARY FORCES.

HOW TO MAKE VOLUNTEERS MORE…

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USEFUL ADVICE.

THE USES OF KNOWLEDGE.

CLOCK AND WATCH TRADE.

DEADLY SMASH OF SHELLS.

A HUMBLE NATURALIST.

A VISIT TO MENKLIIC. !

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----EPITOME OF NEWS.

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LAND AGENT SHOT DEAD.