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OUR LONDON OOHKESPONDEHX.

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OUR LONDON OOHKESPONDEHX. The weather has continued to divide public attention with the war; and, while there has teen much in each topic that was striking, there has been not a little that could be called depressing. The severity of the snowstorm which closed the week in London was such as to put tens of thousands to inconvenience, and aot a few to actual pain Up to the present month, the very decided advance in the price <§ £ coals had not had all the accustomed hard effect of such a measure, because the winter, taken as a whole, had been in the metropolis lairly mild. But when the snow is descending, with heavy frosts to follow, the need of artificial warmth begins forcibly to assert itself, and it is then that the price of fuel proves an absorbing Stem to the careful householder. Not only to him, of course, but in especial to those who have very little margin in their expenditure to eepe with an increased cost for necessaries; and the number of such has lately been much swollen because of the struggle in South Africa. That is a consideration which will weigh with all &ose of generous instincts, for, although very large sums have already been rawed to cope with the various phases of distress that may mault from this conflict, it is already evident that they will be fully required. It is even 80re evident, however, that the public will be aager to supply all that is needed when fully staisfied that the funds are well administered. Among the many indirect effects of the war, one that has struck every habitue of Westmin- ster has been the added zest it has given to the proceedings of Parliament, as far as the attendance of strangers is concerned. There have not been such crowded galleries in the House of Commons for years as during the first three weeks of the present Session; and those innocent folk who imagined that they could stroll down to the House at any moment, catch sight of a friendly member, and at once secure a comfortable seat have been wofully disappointed. That is a kind of thing that can be done in dull sessions, but not in one like the present; and it may be of some use to any Who are contemplating a visit to Westminster liD be told what is the process that has to be undergone at many times. The practice of the Speaker is to issue tickets for the strangers' gilleries six days in advance; and, while 5n ordinary circumstances, there will be some left Sor the very sitting itself, they can all be depended upon to be exhausted in exciting periods within a few hours of the opening of the Speaker's office six days in advance. Those do come to the House of Commons on the aight of an important debate, upon the off- chance of getting a seat are doomed, there- fore, to disappointment, seeing that for such occasions more tickets are always issued in advance than the galleries can quite hold. The caution herein indicated applies almost more emphatically to the case of ladies who Wish to hear a debate. Theii are many fewer seats in the Ladies' Gallery than in the various galleries for their male friends; and the com- petition for them is always so keen that they are ballotted for by members in advance. It is no uncommon thing for a member to ballot who has no particular intention of bringing ladies on that particular sitting, even if he succeeds but, if he does happen to win, he knows there are always other members who much desire the seats, and who will be willing to promise him tickets for a future night which he may require if he will only exchange. This innocent kind of trafficking goes on continu- 8IIy, and ladies, therefore, ought to be some- what patient if they cannot always get into the gallery as readily as they would wish. They can console themselves, in any case, by the reflection that the river terrace is always open to them, and that tea on the terrace remains a pleasant occupation on a summer afternoon. These are matters affecting what may be called the outside. of the House of Commons, but one has just occurred affecting the inside, the full significance of which not even the _gni cance accustomed instructors of the public seern able fully to realise. To our own familiar friend, -the man in the street," there may appear nothing of particular significance in the fact that Sir Reginald Palgrave lias' resigned the position of Clerk of the House, which he had IaeId for fourteen years, and that he has been succeeded by Mr. Archibald Milman, who throughout that period had acted as Clerk- Assistant but to those who know the assembly thoroughly it will be seen that a change of this kind is of moment. The new Clerk of the House may not prove as distinguished a Parlia- mentary jurist as either of his two immediate predecessors, Sir Erskine May and Sir Reginald JPalgrave; but he has, it is confidently stated, assiduously kept a diary for many years, and this should be full of material of piquant inte- rest as well as solid information to the. future fustorian. March 1 should prove an interesting date to all dairy farmers, because it is then that the Milk and Cream Standards' Committee will commence taking evidence. This body, it is to be explained, has been appointed by the president of the Board'of Agriculture for the purpose of inquiring as to what regulations may advantageously be made for determining what deficiency in any of the normal consti- tuents of genuine milk or cream, or what addi- tion of extraneous matter or proportion of water in any sample of milk, including con- densed milk or cream, shall raise a presump- tion that the milk or cream is not genuine. It will sit in London throughout, as at pre- sent arranged, and it intends to call evidence representative of the views of the various inte- torests concerned, including dairy farmers, milk dealers, and public analysts. The question is an important one all round; and those who sell as well as those who buy are keenly inte- rested in the result of the investigation. One of the most approved modern methods of testifying admiration to a great author is to found a society in his honour; and, accordingly, to the Shakspere Society, the Shelley Society, and the Browning Soeiety that we know, ve are now to have added a Ruskin Union. The study of the great critic's works Wtll naturally be the first aim of such a body and it gives some promise of success that it does not set out with absolute adulation, but while regarding his books as the outcome of a genius at once profound, sympathetic, and generous, and nobly used for the benefit of aiankind, the promoters of the new union declare that they view them without indiscriminate approval. This is the attitude most calculated to attract and impress the general public, for tiothing has done more to render such societies ridiculous than their iulsome eulogy of the author they sought to honour. Ruskin is a some which of a surety is not likely to lack honour among his countrymen for long to come; and, although his influence can never be as great again as once it was, it so far makes for good that its fragrance ought to be pre- served. It will be with a natural sense of disappoint- went, but, presumably, with no great surprise, lhat cyclists will learn that the railway gsanagers ara not prepared to yield to their desires, as inljjpiated in a recent deputation to the Railway Clearing House from the National Cyclists' Union and the Cycle Manufacturers' aweiation. The railway reply shows that the companies are not prepared to recom- ownd either a reduction in their charges or an alteration in their present posi- tion of responsibility, while there is 8D be no uniform rule in the matter of cloak room accommodation. Thia attitude of non possumus is not quite preserved in regard to the conveyance of cycles, for it is officially stated that the companies have tried, and are trying, experiments for their safer con- Vayance, and that some are building vana with patent fittings solely for the purpose, from which it is hoped good results will arise. Every Cjrclist will share in this hope but we all know what even in the lighter matters of life is the consequence of hope deferred. R.

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NEWS NOTES.

"POISON BY POST" TRIAL.

1BRITISH SURVEY PARTY! ATTACKED.…

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MARGARINE OR BUTTER?

THE JELUNGA SCANDAL.

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LONDON UNIVERSITY ELECTION,

MR. REDMOND'S MANIFESTO. -

WINTER WEATHER.

MR. COURTNEY AND SIR EDWARD…

FROM CAPE TOWN TO KHARTOUM.

ICAPTURED AND ESCAPED. ;

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ADVENTUROUS SCOUT.

TREATS AT THE MEDICAL CAMP.

AN ALARMING "ALARM."

FADS IN FLONVERS.

THE POPE ON BRITISH GRIT.

A GERMAN OFFICER ON ARTILLERY,…

A BIT OF LOOKING-GLASS. !

CLASSIFICATION OF WOUNDED.

A DIVIDED HOUSE.

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EPITOME OF NEWS. i -j

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