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THE CLAIMS OF WALES.I

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THE CLAIMS OF WALES. I FROM A RHOS-AMERICAN CORRESPONENT. j Writing from Cambridge Mass, Mr T T Jones, says. There must have been hot times in the old town during the bye- election. Tories seem to be as scarce in Rhos now, as they were when I was a boy The name of Sir Foster Cunliffe took me back to the time when I was a young shaver, and Sir Robert Cunliffe was the Liberal candidate for the Denbigh Bor- roughs. I derived a great deal of plea- sure from reading the plain words of Mr Clement Edwards M. P. I agree with him entirely. Being a Rhosite, it almost goes without saying that in British politics I am a Liberal, but I am first of all a Welsh- man and if the Liberal party is trim- j ing the Welsh party, the plain duty of the latter is to trim the former. The claims of Wales are the first consideration of all true Welshmen. The fact—and I have no doubt that, it is a fact-that that clog in the wheel of British progress, the House of Lords, will defeat reformatory measures, is no excuse for the represent- ative body. The American way of deal- ing with the hereditary body would be to send the measures up to the Upper House so that the people could not help realizing that the obnoxious body is worse than useless-that it is a menace to progress and good Government. Then the coun- try would be willing to return to power any party pledged to reform or abolish an institution composed of men whose claims to a place in the council's of the nation is that that they are the sons of their fathers If Great Britain wants to continue to grow in power and influence, it will have to deal vigorously with the House of Lords and take some steps along the line of pen- sions to those whom the government is supporting in affluence, because of noble service rendered by some ancestor hun- dreds of years ago. For instance I under- stand that the Duke of Marlborough draws a pension because of what General John Churchill did some three centuries ago These are but a few of the causes of the white man's burden," in the United. Kingdom, and are more vital in their issues than the hysterical agitation about the laying down of powerful battle ships. THOS. T. JONES.

Welsh Disestablishment Bill.

[No title]

RHOS.

PONKEY CLAIMS.j .-'IS"

[No title]

Cambridge Welshmen.

,RHOS TOWN TALK.

Welsh Territorials Prosecuted

[No title]

RUABON POLICE COURT.

A Fire at Coedpoeth.

Lloyd George, Junior.

--....--._-_-CRICKET,