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---------! A WEEK IN MISSIONARY…

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J THE S f| gg CHILDREN'S |j CORNER & I j ALPHABET NONSENSE. D's a very healthy letter. From all ailments he is free. If you ask me why, I answer, 'Cause he lives beside the C. D meanwhile resides in London, Though he's out of town, they sr y. There's a rumour lie's in Devon, Watching farmers making 'A. F is never in good spirits, So he's not like you and me. Then perhaps he's in the doldrums Altogether? No, not 'E. H and J—good G I'm skipping- On their sight may not rely, I must tell you that between them They have only got one I. K, L, M, N, 0, P often Take a walk the country .through When last heard of by the others They were on the road to Q. R and S are rather greedy But they're cheerful as can be; If they're far away from dinner, They are very near to T. Now then, for a chase get ready- Run. and run your hardest, do! V and W, X, Y, Z In a crowd are after U t -+- NAPOLEON'S SOLDIERS. A soldier once took a message to Napoleon ii such great haste that the horse he rode dropped dead before he delivered the paper. Napoleon dictated his answer and, handing it to the messenger, ordered him to mount his own horsfi and deliver it with all possible speed. The messenger looked at the magnificent animal, with its superb trappings, and said; Nay, general, but this is too gorgeous, too magnificent for a common soldier." Nap(l on said: "Nothing is too good or too magnificent for a common soldier." SOMETHING ABOUT A CHAMELEON. 'Tis green! 'tis green, sir, I assure ye." Green cried the other in a fury. Why, sir, d'ye think I've lost my eyes?" 'Twere no great loss," the friend replies, For if they always serve you thus, You'll find them but of little use." I wonder how many of you know those lines? Not so very long ago all kinds of children used to repeat the poem from which they are taken, bur I don't think the poem can be quite such a favourite as it used to be. Perhaps we are all getting to be such good naturalists that we know it is not quite true, for, though chameleons change their colours in a very wonderful way, they do not go red, white, and blue in the way which the poem makes out. I think I must tell you a little story about a chameleon, though some of you may perhaps have heard it before. An old lady once had a pet chameleon which she was very fond of, and which her manservant, John, used to look after, lie was very fond of the chameleon, too, and he used to amuse himself by putting it on to dif- ferent coloured things in his room and watching it change colour. Well, one day, the old lad.y had a friend to tea, and she thought she would live to show her the chameleon, so she rang foi John. "John," she said, "bring in the chameleon.' John looked very sorry for himself. Please ma'am," he said, I can't." "Can't?" said his mistress. "Why not?" John looked still more confused. Please ma'am." he said, he's gone." Why, how is that?" said the lady. Well, ma'am, I was playing with him, and I put him against my baize apron, and he turned green." Well?" And then I put him against the red tray, ma'am, and he turned red." Yes, yes! Of course he would." And then I put him against your tartan plaid, ma'am, and-and he just bust himself." I am afraid that that story is not altogether true either. ♦ THE TWO APPLE TREES. I have been looking at these two trees, boys," said Mr. Moore one bright Saturday morning, and as there seems to be about the same amount of apples on each one, I have decided that if you want to gather and market them foi yourselves you may do so." "And have the money for ourselves?" thej asked eagerly and in unison. Yes, and you may also take old Billy and the light wagon to draw them to town this after- noon." Before he had ceased speaking, John, the elder boy, had begun to climb one of the trees, and Mr. Moore, without further comment, walked away. The other boy also walked away, but in a different direction. John, meanwhile, having secured a good foot- hold in the centre of the tree, was giving it a vigorous shaking, which sent the apples to the ground in showers. Presently the brother returned carrying a ladder and a basket. Oh, oh," cried John, "you don't mean to say that you intend to pick those apples off the tree ? This is the way to do it," and he gave his tree another energetic shaking. Why, don't you know," he went on, if you stop to pick those apples off it will take you all day long ?" Can't help it," was the answer; that is the, way they are coming off, and the only way." But you'll not be ready to go with them tG town this afternoon." "Then I'll go some other afternoon." "But you can't stay out of school." I can be examined Monday at noon. Dcv I worry, I'll find some way to get my apples t'l market, and they'll bring me a good price wlw' they do get there." John continued his protestation, but 111" brother persisted in doing his work in his own way. Therefore, it was nearly sundown and John had been gone several hours when the brother took the last apple from the tree. When John returned from town soon after he jingled his coins in his hands merrily, and asked with a laugh- Don't you wish you had some ph "How much did you get a bushel?" asked his brother. Thirty-five cents," said John. A few moments later when they entered the barn together, where the brother's apples were carefully bestowed in baskets, John exclaimed- What m the world did you do to those apples? They look as if they had been polished?" Oh, just a cloth and a little rubbing did the job," was the answer. Who would believe that the trees which boie those apples and John's were exactly alike?" said Mr. Moore, coming into the barn at this moment. John looked grave. But what's the use of all that trouble ? They'll not bring you any more," he said scorn- fully. Wait and see," said the brother. On Monday evening, when the younger brother returned from the village he counted out I" money, and he had received just double the amount that John had been paid for his apples. I didn't know," said John, that taking a little trouble would make so great a difference about the very same thing." ♦ RIDDLES. How may book-keeping be taught in three words?—Never lend them.. Why would fashionable tailors meke good tavalry horses?—Because they are high chargers. Why is the Isle of Wight a fraud ?—Because it has Needles you cannot thread, Freshwater Sou cannot drink, Cowes you cannot milk, and fewport you cannot bottle."

-'--LONDON & NORTH WESTERN…

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