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WRECK OF THE ROYAL CHARTER.

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DANCING CLASSES IN WALES.

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WRECK OF THE ROYAL CHARTER.

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r since she first started from Liverpool. Hie was appointed as fourfLh officer the voyage previous to the last. At the Z7, time of the, appointment he had not- served out his ime, but he was a very clever draughtsman, which talent he in- herited from his father, who is a mechanical draughtsman to the firm of Penn and Son, the ce,l,ebrated marine engine-boilermakers, of London. He was a mere youth in years, but. a man possessed of sterling nautical qualities. "The purser, Mr John Lewis, com- menced his sea. life on board the. steam- ship 'Great Western.' In her he made several trips- across the Atlantic. He afterwards- -entered on board the 'City of Pittsburgh' steamer, belonging- to an American company; she- was burnt, to the water's edge, and he lost his all, and suffered much privation, both bodily and mentally. He afterwards, entered on board the steamship 'Great Britain,' and in her was; promoted to the post of chief steward, which he filled without com- plaint all the time he was in her, more especially while she was in the transport service, when he came more, especially under my notice. 'On her being paid off by the, government, he was transferred to the Royal Charter as purser, which situation he has well and truly filled to the satisfaction of all—owners, passengers and crew. He was allowed to. he, the best purser that, ever sailed on the, sea; he weill knew how to make the most of every- thing on board. He was most gentle- manly -in his manner; he was very engaging and most, pleasant in his con- versation, and many—very many—pas- sengers will remember the pleasant hours spent .in his cabin, after the business of the day was over. He belonged to Bristol. and has left a widow and two children. "I üome now to a person whose talents and edurat.inn were of a different kind— poor John Rogers, the chief engineer. He wa,s the second engineer on the 'Great Britain' whiLel in the transport, service, and for some time previous, I believe. He had made altogether six trips to Australia, and this unfortunate one was the seventh. On the Rioyal Charter being ready for sea, he was promotedl chief in her, which situation he has filled ever since. He was a, good practical engineer, Z, and one who was complete master of every part, of his. trade. He was very fond of. his- violin, and, when not steaming, many a pleasant hour have I spent, in listening to the beautiful Scottish alirs he used to play; but his, little engines were, his chief deCight; he used to called them his chil- .diren, and often, in the midst of our amuse- ment, would he say—'Come and see, how my children look.' He was a Scotch- man, born in Edinburgh, but, for many years his family have been residing in Liverpool. He has left a widow and six children to mourn their loss. "The second engineer's name I cannot recollect, but his..christian name was 'Frank.' "The third engineer was named Hos- kins, son of the, Captain Hoskins, who was in command of the 'Great Britain' when she was wrecked in Dundrum Bay. He played very well on the cornopean, and, when the ship was lying in Port, Phillip Bay, used to enliven the tedium with the strains of his music. He was a very gentlemanly young man, and atten- tive to. its duty. "The; fourth, a bioilermaker, whose name was Wilson, I did not, know much of, only that, he was a Scotchman, and could 'spin a good yarn.' "The principal .storekeeper, Robert. Clu-cas, will long be remembered by the many passengers ,and others who were, 'acquainted with him. He always gave satisfaction to every person, and when the toils of thei day were over, the many invitations he had to the passengers' concerts and parties, told how he was be- loved. He could sing a, good song, and tell a good story. He belonged to the Isle of Man, and had a brother living in Liverpool. "The barkeeper was Edward Lewis, brother to the purser. He had been at, sea many years. I think he told me that he had been shipwrecked on the coast of South America,. His situation was a, diffi- cult one to fill, more especially on board a passenger vessel, and to give satisfac- tion to all was a most;, difficult, ta.sk; but, yet, he managed to. please every one, and to carry .out the regulations to the. best of his ability. He was also married, and had a son in Australia, and a wife and several children in BristojL "And now for one solitary middy on board, whose name was Frederick Foster, an orphan. He, was fonder of his bunk than the deck. He never would have made a good sailor, but now all his troubles are over. "The chief steward, Mr Emery, I did not know much of. He was of a reserved dispoisi'tiion, but always paid pairticular attention to his duties, as the excellent table that, used toO be spread in the Charter could testify. He belonged to Liverpool, and was married. "The chief steward of the second-class saloon was Mr Allen; he had been first, steward to. the, officers' mess-room. On being promoted) to the saloon the officers presented him with a purse, in remem- ,lbrance of his kindness and attention to' them. He was afterwards promoted to the situation of chief of the second-class, which situation he ably filled during several voyages. He was one of the smartest stewards thai ever were on board a ship, and the many presents he received fully testified as to how he did his duty. He has left a widow and family, who re- side on the Cheshire side of the Mersey. "The stewardess, was Miss Wareing" whose father has been in Mr B-nght's employ very many years. She was a very good modes, young woman. She had made two, trips in the ship, and was uni- versally 'liked, by all the lady passengers in the saloon; but her services and at- tention were very often given to the second-class a,s well; and often have I seen her in the very bows of the, ship visiting some poor third-class passenger who was sick;—indeed;, even to the com-