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LONDON & NORTH WESTERN RAILWAY

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THE VALUE OF TIME.

I"C"'f"""""'.1IIf' REAL HELP

THE TOAST OF "WALES." !

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CtHURtC'B: AND cnAPEtL STATISIias…

. WELSH OR. LATIN.

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THE TOAST OF "WALES." !

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field, and bad gained renown throughout the world in that respect. The, combina- tion which had been so' successful on the football field could usefully be employed in other directions ajiso.—(He'ar, hear.) Welshmen had been working throughout the ages as individuals, but now' they were getting organised in all directions— through their elementary and secondary schools and university colleges. They were combining heart, mind, intellect and body, and he hoped they were going to produce great men and great women, to build an Empire on higher issues in order to produce, still finer results.—(Applause.) He hoped that the Welsh Society in Gloucester would assist in that great work. The members could help. They stood for the character of Wales in Glou- cestershire, and he horped and believed that they would ever do all in their power to maintain the best traditions and the highest ideals of the'ir beloved country. In asking the compajiy to drink to the toast of "Wales," he invited all Welshmen in the district to do their part in maintain- ing and elevating the name and character of the Prinotpality before the world.— (Loud applause.) At the conclusion of the speech, Mr James Herbert, referred to the intense pleasure which it had afforded to all present, and called for three hearty cheers for the eloquent! son of Wales who had proposed the toast. The invitation was responded to with great enthusiasm. The' Chairman, in the name of the com- pany, thanked Mr Jones for his eloquent and inspiring address, and on behalf of the Gloucester Welsh Society asked his acceptance of an illuminated copy (the work of Mr W. L. Meredith) of a favourite old Welsh air. Dr. Howell re- marked that, he had heard the toast of "Wales" proposed on many occasions, but never before had he felt himself stirred to such a. degree as he had been that evening whilst listening to Mr .Tünes' eloquent speech. He now could under- stand the feeling which actuated the en- thusiastic Welshmen of old who followed Owen Glyndwr to death and, as it, hap- pened, to glory also. He (Dr. Howell felt as he listened to' Mr Jones that he could follow him to death, even if it did not lead to glory, although he was sure that such a man icould not, lead his followers to anything else.—(Applause.) He thought, that in some respects Mr Jones resembled St. David, the patron saint of Wales, in whose honour they were assembled that evening. St. David was a militant saint, who was represented as carrying a Bible in one hand and a sword in the other. He (Dr. Howell) could picture Mir Jones with his Bfible or his list of ideals for the Welsh in li-s one hand and his sword in the other, and as a brother Welshman he felt he could follow him.—(Applause.) Mr Jones had confidently appealed to the members of the Welsh Society in Gloucester to assist in the promotion of the best Welsh ideals and traditions, and he (the Chairman) was sure that he had not done so in vain. The Society had already more' than justified its existence, and he hoped that' an increased member- ship would enable its sphere of usefulness to be still further 'extended. The formar- tion of the Society had enabled Welsh- men and women residing- in the districrb to spend many pleasant and profitable hours together, and he was anxious that those who were still outside the ranks of the Society should know something of the deHghts which membership of it afforded. t —(Applause.) Mr Jones, M.P.? accepted the ?i.ft' "with very much pleasure, and said he should treasure it not merely as a very fine work of art, but as a tangible expression of the goodwill which the members of the' Gloucester Welsh Society had shown to- wards him.—(Applause.) Tlhe hon. Mem- ber proceeded to mafke a few remarks on the subject of Welsh music, in the course of which he showed in a mosfi interesting' manner how certain musical terms and expressions had become intimately asso- ciated with the' thought, philosophy, and, indeed, t!he whole life of the nation.