Hide Articles List

12 articles on this Page

Advertising

ILONDON GOSSIP.

Advertising

LUNG TROUBLES.

[No title]

THE LONELY KAISER.

JOYS OF THE CHRISTMAS DINNER.

Advertising

FOOTBALL, AND THE CHURCHES.

[No title]

Advertising

ILONDON GOSSIP.

News
Cite
Share

semi-transparent fabric. Thel neck of the up-to-date tea gown is now very generally cut square, and filled in with lace, or tuck- ed net, the sleeves to maltch being of the fashionable tightly fitting persuasion and reaching to the wrists. THE "ALMSBAG" POCKET. Bands of fur decorate many of the smartest indoor gowns, especially those built of voile, crepe de chine, and similar fabrics. And the latest idea is to supply with such gowns huge "almsbag" pockets, which are fashioned of fur to match, and slung from the waist by means of narrow fur bands. The effect is quaint of course, but sometimes it is just a little heavy, and the bag itself made of the same fabric as the gown, much gathered and rucked, and simply tfrimmed and slung! with the fur bands, is perhaps a happier arrangement. [ BLUE SiEThG Ei AGAIN. Blue serge is having an immense vogue, but not simply cut and neatly braided as in days gone by. It is fashioned upon much more extravagant Lines, one blue serge toilette which found a place in a recent trousseau being trimmed with black satin, several bands of this material ap- pearing upon the skirt, and also being utilised for the large pointed revers, and long-tucked sleeves. 'The notion of hav- ing sleeves built of similar fabric to thait which trims the gown is a happy one for the renovator as the somewhat rapid change from the loose "bag" to the tightly- fitt,ing rucked, gathered, or pleated sleeve, ,is placing many of us in grave difficulties. Mill, MARION CRAWFORD'S TRILOGY Readers and admirers of Mr Marion Crawford will greatly appreciate the beautiful special presentation edition of his trilogy. "Soprano," "The Prima- donna," "The Diva's Ruby"—in limp crimson leather, which Messrs Macmillan have sent out for Christmastide. Those of us who have followed Margaret Donne's career through "Soprano" and "The Primadonna" will be even still more charmed and fascinated with "The Diva's Ruby" in which Mr Crawford takes us from T'artary to London, thence to Bay- reuth, and later to the yacht, where the adventures of the prima donna culminate. 41111œ'mrI'IIS-