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ILONDON GOSSIP.

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I LONDON GOSSIP. CHRISTMAS IN SWITZERLAND. Egypt and the Riviera remain the chosen winter playgrounds of a great portion of the fashionable world, but, of late years, Switzerland has become a very popular re- sort for leisured people. The season lasts I from about the middle of December to the beginning of February, and there is a never ceasing round of all kinds of winter sports. These are already in full swing at Sit. Moritz, and Grindelwald, where the hotels are, by no means expensive. Skat- ing, ski-ing, curling hockey on the ice, tobogganing, bob-sleighing, and picnics occupy the day-time, whilst at night the, choice lies between masked balls, private theatricals, and moonlight excursions. The air is cold, but dry, crisp, and ex- hilarating, whilst the, sun shines for eight or nine hours dalily. The Duchess of Marlborough has recently taken her younger son, Lord Ivor Spencer Churchill, to St. Moritz, in the hope that, he will benefit from the bracing climate, and Mr Hall Caine is amongst the many well- known people who will spend Christmas in Switzerland. In the ordinary way the usual winter costumes of tweed or serge such as ar worn at home, are all that are wanted, beyond an extra short skirt or two for a sporting holiday of this kind. I THIEl BOUGHT1 PLUM PUDDING. There is an old, but not yet superan- nuated maxim-if you want, a thing well done do it yourself—and this certainly applies to the making of the C'hriistmas pudding. The growing fashion of buying ready-made puddings at the storekeepers- like one buys jams or confectionery—is one more sign of the fading1 away of the romance of Ohristmas but as a rule, the bought plum-pudding' is a poor substitute for what, the good housewife can produce, and it lacks the sentiment that attaches to the family pudding, in which is hidden the nimble sixpence, the silver thimble, the wedding ring, and the unobtrusive button. In the old days, the kitchen was the heart of the Kingdom at this time of year, but the modern tendency to spend Christmas away from home has weakened the traditions of the festival in this re- spect, in not a few families, to the disappearance of the home-made pudding and its time-honored associations. THE SCOTTISH WOMEN APPEAL. The House of Lords has decided that the Scottish women graduates are not entitled to vote for the University Mem- bers of Parliament. The names of the women graduates of each Slcotitish Uni- versity are on the Parliamentary Voting Register, and in the Act enfranchising Scottish graduates the word "person" is used, not "man." It was therefore con- tended that the word "person" included women, and that according to the statutory law they were entitled to the vote. The 'Court of Session twice decided against this view, and the House of Lords has upheld this decision, on the ground that when the Act of 1868 was passed, women were not, admitted to the Univer- sities, and the Legislature did not there- fore contemplate the possibility of the word "person," including women. That undoubtedly was the case, but when Miss Macmillan was arguing the point in the House of Lords, was told by Lord Loreburn that, she could not discuss the intentions of Parliament, but must confine herself to the law and facts as they were. That may be good law, but the judgment of the House of Lords is based entirely upon what Parliament meant, not what Parlia- ment did, and in the face of this ruling, it does not seem very logical, at least from the way women look at things. WOMEN AND MOTOR OARS,. As time goes on, more and more women are found driving their own cars, and it is said for them; that they are the most careful drivers, never losing their heads when facing a traffic problem, or dis- covered responsible for an accident. More- over the woman who drives her car is usually particularly keen on thoroughly understanding all the workings of it, and exceedingly interested in improvements either in the chassis, or the engines. The idea, of women becoming drivers of motor omnibuses, or cabs, is of course ahsurd, the work would be far too heavy and dirty for them, but as tutors at motor schools, or chaffeurs, at country houses, where a man is available to overhaul and keep the car clean, there would seem to be yet, other openings for women. LUXURIOUS TRAVELLING. With regard to the coloring of cars this winter, there is a decided tendency to indulge in startling hues, such as cherry- red, and bright blue-stripes too are much seen, azure and black, light and dark yellow, green and blue, being the choice of many a wealthy woman, who sees to it that the inside fittings of her covered automobile leave nothing1 further to be desired. The lining, whether of cloth, brocade, or leather, is chosen with a view to setting off the owner's toilettes and complexion, and there are little hanging cushions for comfort on a long run. Pouches for letters and papers are fixed within comfortable reach, also folding' writing slab;, replete with escritoire materials. A fitted tea basket is tucked away beneath the seat, also a fitted dress- ing case, a triny book case, and a first aid case, and in the roof and sides are placed sunken electric lights. Truly the wealthy have theiir "Sittings" made very easy and comfortable for them nowadays. < » ABOUT TEA GOWNS. The one fabric tea gown is rarely seen, all. the best among such creations relying upon at least one underdress to complete a color scheme. For instance, particu- lar happy combinations much in evi- < dE nee, are mole tones worn over soft, pink, pale green, heliotropes, or primrose. The » underdress is usually of the softest silk I 01* satin, the gown itself beiing1 of some

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LUNG TROUBLES.

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THE LONELY KAISER.

JOYS OF THE CHRISTMAS DINNER.

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FOOTBALL, AND THE CHURCHES.

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ILONDON GOSSIP.