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FACTS THAT SPEAK.

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FACTS THAT SPEAK. By universal consent 1908 is one of the bad years in the story of the world's work. Business is slack. Money is not, earning a profit. There is a sadly high rate of unemployment. National recelipts show a woeful falling off. Workless men are standing idle in all the market places. The back street feel the pinch of hunger; Charitable Agencies are pressed beyond measure to meet the calls upon them. Every large city has this year a larger area of poverty and nakedness and under- feeding to attend to. One is glad to think that Rescues Agencies are so many as they are and that they are resolutely up and doing during these times of depression to save England from the scandal of the neglected little one. For it is the chil- dren who are the sorest sufferers. Among these Agencies Dr. Barnardo's Homes stand, as for 42 years they have stood, in the very front rank. The inspiration of their Founder who died three years ago is still potent in the Institutions which he left behind him, and to-day the Homes are doing a larger work than they have ever done. Their statistics are striking to the last degree. One reach of a, rescued Family which always numbers over 8,000 boys and girls. There were 2,804 admissions last year and the total admissions to date number 67,417. There are 137 separate Branches daily in active operation for different classes of the stranded and the destitute; 1,439 babies below five years of age under the care of the Homes and 1,075 who are in some way or other afflicted. This year they have emigrated to Canada 4 batches of trained young people -630 boys and 313 girls—bringing up their grand total to 20,670. The demand for these young people far exceeds the the supply: Canada warmly welcomes such additions to her community (although during the present, depression adult emi- gration is being discouraged) and her pub- lic officials testify that 98 per cent. of them are successes. Many of the boys and girls sent forth from the Homes in earlier years have now attained to positions of re- sponsibility in commercial, oivic and re- ligious life. 4,520 of the Eighth Thousand little peo- ple of the Homes are boarded-out in rural cottages—sent "back to the land" to reap all the benefits which the country has in store for a growing youngster. 1,100 young people are under Industrial Train- ing. Over a dozen trades are busily going, and the young workers are being; well fitted to earn their bread as the world's skilled workmen. There is a Creche for the little children of "mean streets" in the East End. There is a Castle for Babies; there are Hospitals for the suffering: there are training Shops and Schools and Laundries and Embroidery Rooms. Above all, there is Christian influence and Gospel teaching. Besides the teaching and clothing of these 8,000 destitute Little Ones, there is the feeding of them: -2.240 is required every day in this direction alone. The Homes are dependent entirely upon volun- tary contributions for their support. There is no State aid, and their invest- ments are. not sufficient to pay their Food Bill for two days. Mr William Baker, M.A., LL.B., the Honorary Director of the Homes, sits daily at, the receipt of custom at the Head Offices, 18 to 26, Step- ney Causeway, London, E., and we are sure he will be delighted, especially at the Christmas Season, to hear from any of our readers who sympathise to the extent of a cheque or postal order! of a ,cheque or postal order!

NOT RIGHT IN HIS MIND.

[No title]

FOOTBALL NOTES. I

THE; MAN AND THE NET.

SERIOUS CHANCES ARE TAKEN…

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