Hide Articles List

11 articles on this Page

Advertising

------------REVIEWS.

[No title]

COLWYN BAY PETTY SESSIONS.

News
Cite
Share

COLWYN BAY PETTY SESSIONS. crOLWIYN BAY JUSTICES AND THE police;. AN HOTEL LICENCE, TRANSFER. í Mr E. A. Grabbe, applied to the magis- trates at Colwyn Bay Petty Sessions on Saturday for temporary authority for Mrs Amy Meier to conduct the business of the Rhos Abbey Hotel, Rhos-on-Sea, until the next transfer day, when, he said, he would apply for the licence to be trans- ferred from Mr F. C. Meier, her husband, to herself. Mir Mieier was leaving the neighbourhood, and the business belonged to his wife. He (Mr Crabbe) acted for all parties, and in due course would serve the proper notices. He had also given notice of the present application to the police. Inspector T'ippitt said he had no objec- tion to the application. FEMALE' LICENSEES. Mr T. G. Osborn, one of the magis- trates, said there was a good many female licensees in the district, and there seem- ed to be a tendency to take licences from men, who were able to look after the licensed places, to women, who had not the same powers of control. He was not sure that was satisfactory. Mr Crabbe replied that Mrs Meier had been brought up in the business; her parents were in the business at. the present time, and she was thoroughly capable of conducting a first-class hotel of the nature of the Rhos Abbey. The Chairman (Mr Kneeshaw): Mr Osborn's remarks were general, and did not apply particularly to this case. I myself thing it is undesirable that ladies should go into businesses that should have men at the head of them. UNHAPPY DOMESTIC RELATIONS. The Chairman, after a, consultation with other magistrates, further suggested to Mr Ctraibbe that the original licence, under the circumstances^ should have been in Mrs Mfeier's name. Mr Crahbe: I agree. The Chairman: We shall be glad of some information as to why the husband is leaving. Mr Crabbe I would rather explain to the licensing, justices at the next transfer day. The reason is perfectly legitimate, and I am only applying, for a, temporary authority now. The Chairman We think it is due to us that. we should know the circumstances under which the husband is leaving his wife. He has been residing at the hotel, and she is now asking for the licence, which might have been granted to her long ago. Mr Crabbe To put it plainly, domestic differences have arisen between them, and the present licensee is leaving the country in a day or two. I may assure you that you are doing no one any injury by transferring the licence. There will hel no attempt to. defeat the creditors, or anything of that sort. The Chairman That, does not. concern us at present. The case, is different from what it might have been if the transfer had been to some other person than the wife of the licensee. Mr Crabbe replied that he might, put in certain documents, but they would be dis- closed on the transfer day. THE! POLICE QUESTIONED. The, Chairman (addressing Inspector Tippitt): I have a, question to put to you, whether you know any reason why this licence should be transferred. Inspector Tippitt: I know nothing at all. The Bench then consulted together for some minutes) and the. Chairman after- wards informed Mr Crabibe that the magistrates were reluctant to grant the application upon the statement he had made. Could Mr Crabbe supplement the sta,tement, in any way? Mr Crabbe: I, can supplement, it by stating that at the present moment Mrs Meier is the absolute owner of the busi- ness, and that, the lease is in her name. The Chairman That only deepens the matter. Mr Crabbe: But only recently since the fresh arrangements have been made, between the husband and wife. The Chairman What is the, matter with the husband? Mr C'rabbe I will put it in writing, if you like. The Chairman Why not state, it public- ly? Mr Crabbe You think it ought to be made public? Well, the cause of the domestic, trouble has arisen from the drunken habits of the husband. He has been imperilling the licence and the busi- ness of the hotel. The Chairman How about his mental capacity ? Mr Crabbe: Well, if a man has been continually in a. state of drunkenness, his mental capacity cannot be very great. The Chairman It its not so bad that he is really mentally incapacitated 1 Mr C'rabbe No, sir; I cannot say that. THE! POLICE! CRITICISED. Mtr- J. W. Lumley (one, of the ma,gis- trates): Now I should like to ask the police how it is they don't know about. this case,? Inspector Tippitt: I heard nothing about the application until I came into court this morning. The Chairman You have control of the police, and this gentleman has been in the state you have heard about. How is it that the police know nothhig about it? Mr Crabbe: I can supplement that by saying that there are two classes of drunk- ards-the open drinker and the, sly drinker, the one who gets into a, room and muddles himself w':t,h drink there. This man has not been drinking in a. way that would author: se the police to sav '.hat he was a. drunkard. He drank in secret, privately. The Chairman That would account for

Advertising

FATTENING THE! HAY CROP. -I

SEND FOR A FREE BOX of the…

[No title]

_IU;;--"'--""""'S.u:.a.-:",.£.;::-",,::;.-_.-__.-.__.-----LONDON…

Advertising

COLWYN BAY PETTY SESSIONS.