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---------LLYS HELIG.

OCTOBER MAGAZINES.

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OCTOBER MAGAZINES. RACE-HORSE ROGUES. In his article, on "Rogues Among Race- horses," in the October ssue of "Fry's Magazine," Mr A. Sidney Galtrey un- doubtedly opens up a subject that is full of interest alike to the, sportsman and to the general public. It has always been an open -uestion whether many horses which have been branded as rogues were actually such, or whether some physical disability was not responsible for their bad form. The opinions of such eminent authorities as Mr Leopold de Rothschild, Lord Londonderry, Mr W. B. Purefoy, Mr John Porter, and Mr Sam, Darling are here given, and deserve the careful atten- o tion of all interested parties. Golfers are, as usual, well catered for; for in addition to another interesting article in the series on "Lies—Good and Bad," by A. C. Mi. Groome, there is also a thoughtful article by Bernard Darwin on "The Professionals at Work." "WIDE WORLD." There is something to, suit all tastes in the October number of the "Wide Wo,rld Magazine." It opens with an enthralling account of the, romantic career of the Spanish brigand, El Vivillo, whose boast it is that no prison can hold him. Then we have "A Walrus Hunt in the Arctic," a, striking article illustrated with what are claimed to be the only set of photographs ever taken of the walrus in a state of nature. "The Capture of Antonio Bar- racolo" forms a, remarkable sequel to an authoritative article which the magazine recently published exposing the terrible doings of the dreaded American Secret Society known as the "Black Hand." Half a score of other contributions, all full of human interest, complete an excellent number of this ever-welcome magazine. THE "STRAND." Sherlock Holmes is again the principal attraction in the "Strand" this month, and we are bound to admit that we have en- joyed this last story quite as well as any of its famous predecessors. Sir A. Conan Doyle has lost none of that marvel- lous skill which made the name and. fame of Sherlock Holmes world-wide; and in the present story he gives full play to his wonderful imagination and amazing powers of deduction, and it is indeed quite a truism to say that the reader is literally held spell-bound. Mr Winston Churchill, too, is especial- ly interesting this month, treating of the Murchison Falls, and we honestly ques- ton whether we have ever followed a series. of articles with so much real interest and pleasure as we have these brilliant arti- cles on his African Journey. In addition to all this there is also a delightful short story by Richard Marsh, entitled "The Girl in the, Light Blue Dress" interest- ing articles on "Bills of Birds," by E. H. Aitken; Mr S. H. Sime and his Work, with many examples of his art; "The Comic Side of Crime," which is both written and illustrated by Harry Furniss a beautifully illustrated article on "The Ideal of Child-Beauty of Different Nations," and several other fine stories and articles. It will thus easily be seen that the October "Strand Magazine" is a bumping six-pennyworth. » THE; "GRAND." With each issue of the "Grand Magazine of Fiction" one wonders less and less at the firm hold it has obtained on the affections of the more intelligent section of the reading public; and who does not aspire to be classed in this cate- gory? The "Grand" has struck a, dis- tinctly new note in Elnglish periodical publications. There is a distinct flavour about these stories which agreeably pleases and interests. From the very opening sentences one realises that the aiuthors are not first and foremost men and women who make their livelihood by reconstruct- ing ridiculous little fables on lines that have done duty thousands of times too often already—fables which, whatever the original model may have been, are quite preposterously untrue to the life of to- day, which they are supposed to describe. This distinguishing characteristic is, per- haps, even more marked in the October number of the "Grand" than in any of the issues that have preceded it; so, at any rate, it seems to us after a, rapid review of the contents. The names of some, of the jirincipal contributors are alone a guarantee of the interesting stories: Miss Macnaughton, G. A. Riddell, Ara,bella Kenealy, Count Tolstoi, Lady Helen Forbes, M'ay Edgin- ) ton, Carl Ewald. Two of the more serious I stories, "Thomas Browne's Son," by A. E. P Weigall, chief inspector of Egyptian Antiquities; and "Carriage No. 105," by John Philips, late director of the Con- fidential Inquiry Branch of the General Post Office., are certainly destined to pro- voke great interest

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