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WISE AND OTHERWISE.

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LIBERAL DEMONSTRATION AT LLANDUDNO.

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LIBERAL DEMONSTRATION AT LLANDUDNO. MR. WILLIAM: JONES, M.P. AND THE: PARTY PROGRAMME. The visit of Mr William Jones,, M.P., to Llandudno attracted .a, large audience to the Town Hall on Friday evening, Mr Henry Wooldall presiding over a, most enthusiastic gathering. There was a strong gathering on the platform, including the Revs. John Raymond, and J. Wesley Whitmore, Messrs. J. J. Mlarks, T. W. Griffith, O1. W. Roberts, Robert Roberts, Spinther James, ■— Peacock, Wm. Thomas (Wihite House), etc., etc,. Mr Henry Woodall, in opening the meeting, said there was no single in- dividual present who did not feel that the passing of Sir H. Campbell-Bannerman from the scene of his labours was a cause for national lamentation, for he wa,s one of the most ardent and sympathetic lead- ers that ever held the reins of Govern- ment or guided, the fortunes of a party. (Applause.) They would all hope that, having cast aside the cares of office, he might be spared through many years to rejoice in the growth of the reforms which he had done so much to foster.—(Ap- plause.) A resolution moved by the President and seconded by Mr J. AliciMaster, was passed congratulating Mir Asquith upon his appointment to the Premiership,, and pledgng the meeting to give its loyal sup- port to the Licensing and other policies of the Government. Mr M'Master urged Mr William Jones to bring in a bill closing public-houses on all election days. It, was time, he said, to prevent the "Trade" from bamboozling, dragooning, and drugging the people into voting as they had done in recent elections. Mr William Jones, who followed and was very heartily received, said that though the Liberal party had lost their stalwart and beloved leader, whom every section respected for his honesty, sincerity, humanity, geniality, and con- summate conciliatory p,ower-(apiplau,se)- the captaincy had fallen into the hands of one of the most powerful intellects in the political world and one of the most cap- able administrators of modern times.- (Appla.use.) When 'Mr Asquith was Minister of Home Affairs he appointed for the first time women inspectors of factories, and Wales would always re- member him as the Minister who intro- duced the great measure for securing re- ligious equality in the, Principality.- (Applause.) As Chancellor of the Ex- chequer he had greatly improved the finances of the country, and there was a surplus this year of nearly five millions. —(Applause.. Mr Jones also eulogised the work and the extraordinary abilities of Mr Lloyd George, who was expected to succeed Mr Asquith as Chancellor of the Exchequer. He went on to detail the programme of the new Liberal Administration, which would be solidly supportedl, he said, by the great progressive majority of the House of Commons. The programme in- cluded the maintenance of Free Trade, the reform of the Poor Law, the fairer valua- tion of land, and licensing reform. The Licensing Bill was explained at length, and in paticular Mr William Jones de- fended the fourteen years' limit. The licenses," even undier Mr Balfour's Act, were not freehold, he said. Even now any licence might be refused renewal if its holder was convicted, but, added Mir Jones, should the time limit not be suffi- cient it might, be increased. Referring to land reform, the speaker said that with the SmallHoldings Act, a fair Valuation Act, and co-operative associations, he hoped that the country wouild, by and by be populated by producers of butter, bacon, and eggs such as prosperous Free Trade Denmark produced so successfully.—(Ap- plause.) M,r O. W. Roberts, in pro-posing a. vote of confidence in Mr Wm. Jones, said that he would: like to see him oftener at Llan- dudno. His visits were very much appre- ciated and productive of much good to the cause.—(Applause.) He looked for-. ward with great interest. and expectation to the promised measure of Poor1 Law re- form which would follow the report of the Royal Commission, and hoped for one thing provision would be made for en- abling all children now condemned to the workhouse to be brought up in cottaige homes.-(Applau,se.) He also hoped that not work, although able-bodied, would although able-bodied, not work, would be drastically dealt with.—(Applause.) Mr James Marks seconded the votel, which was most enthusiastically carried. Mir Jones, in reply, said he believed in going round the villages as much as possible.—(Hear, hear.) That was one reason he had left, Llandudno to the last, but another was that he had a. promise from Mr Birrell to visit the town.— (Applause.) Just at present, however, that minister had found! it impossible to come, but the promise still held good, and he hoped that on his next visit Mr Birrell would accompany him.(Applause.) Two questions were then handed to Mr Jones, the first of which asked his reason for voting in the majority against the- un- employment bill introduced on behalf of the Labour party. In reply Mr Jones saidi that he was not going to be a party to the turning out of the Government. The Bill contained some very useful clauses, but the. third was altogether too drastic. This statement .was received with cries of "No, no" from the back of the hall, but Mr Jones maintained that it was too drastic and that the Government by means of re-afforestation, reclaiming the fore- shore, etc., would, when the Royal Com- missioners had completed their work, deal with the problem in a, variety of ways which would, considerably reduce the number of unemployed. A vote of thanks to the Chairman, pro- posed by Mr Jones, and seconded by Mr T. W. Griffith, terminated the meeting.

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