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Hockey.

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TIDE TABLE FOR THE NORTH WALES…

A FIGHT FOR LIBERTY.

PERSONAL AND SOCIAl

SYAINGS OF THE JVEEK.

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WEEK BY WEEK.

JOTTINGS FROJf NATURE.

Abergele Sparks.

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Abergele Sparks. What a rollicking time of it the Wesleyans of Abergele must have had in the good old days gone by. Wesleyan Methodism was introduced into Abergele immediately after the formation of the Welsh Mission in 1800. In the September of that year the two missioners, the Revs. Owen Davies and John Hughes, visited the town. Mr. Oven Davies preached in English on the street, and had a peaceable hearing save for the disturbance of two clergymen who tried to distract the congregation. Mr. John Hughes soon afterwards preached in Welsh in the parlour of the Union Hotel. Fancy preaching in a pub It was in 1802, however, that the attempt was made to es- tablish regular preaching in the town. Messrs. John Bryan and Edward Jones, Bathafarn, had now entered the ministry, and on Whit-Monday, 1802 (a general holi- day), they started their campaign in Aber- gele. Strange as it may now seem, Meth- odism is ind-ebted to the public house for a shelter in its early days in many a neigh- bourhood. So it happened at Abergele. The daughter of the Cellar Inn had some time previously married Mr. Richard Griffiths, of Denbigh, who with his parents were already Wesleyan Methodists in that town. Mr. and Mrs. Griffiths were the parents of t lwydfardd, the elsji Arch- druid. Through their influence the Cellar Inn yard was secured for the service, and a large number of friends from St. Asaph and Denbigh accompanied them to Abergele to support the evangelists. The Sunday even- ing following Edward Jones, Bathafarn, rode into the town from Conway, and though hundreds had gathered to listen to him in the vicinity of the Cellar Inn yard he was forbidden by a magistrate and the vicar to preach. But they sill persisted, and afterwards, till June 26th, 1804, tkey preached first at the Fron and then at the George Inn. What would the Abergele preachers of to- day say if thev were asked to preach a ser- mon in the Old George and Dragon? But the Salvation Army lasses in England do this kind of work almost every night of their lives. There is a lot of good work waiting to be performed by preachers even in public houses and barbers' shops! So let them be up and doing. From the 1st January next the County Court of Flintshire will be held at Rhyl only, and not at St. Asaph and Rhyl as it has been in the past. Well, there are plenty of people living in this district who would not grumble one little bit if the County Coutt of Flintshire was held alternately in Jerusalem and Jericho. County Courts are not conducive to a life of contentedness. They are only good for the judges, registrars, and bailiffs. SEARCHLIGHT.

Llandudno Field Club. r T

! Educational Handwork.

Colwyn Bay Liberal Association.

Poultry.

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