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Mr. William Jones, M.P., at…

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Mr. William Jones, M.P., at Conway. TIMELY ADDRESS TO YOUNG PEOPLE. A SANE VIEW OF NATIONAL PASTIMES. Mr. William Jones, M.P., presided on Wednesday last at the afternoon meeting of the Young People's Convention held at Conway, and delivered a magnificent ad- dress. The popular Member for Arfon, who spoke in Welsh, said that he had only just got to know the genesis of that Convention of young people. It appeared to be an offspring of the revival, when there was a Christian awakening throughout the country. Since the revival it was rightly thought that sufficient was not being done in the inter- ests of the young people to keep the good effects of the revival crystallised. Many of their weaker brethren had fallen after the full force of the revival had been spent. Others again, had kept the faith strongly and resolutely, and so as to perpetuate the govxf done by the revival young people's conven- tions were being held in North and South Wales. He could give instances of many who had kept the faith, even amongst prize- fighters and gamblers who had been con- verted. One man he knew who had been in jail off and on for eighteen years, and when he was let out of that place his only consideration was how he could get in again. That man was ultimately brought under the influence of jreal religion, and though he could not at one time read, he now was able to read his Bible, and had taught his wife and children to do the .same. He prospered in the worldly sense as well, and was able to purchase horses for his business, and there was almost sanc- tity surrounding the well-cared-for animal he used to drive. (Laughter.) They as Christians must widen the Kingdom of Christ. They must go out unto the people who were not within the fold. It was not sufficient to say, The Church is here and her doors are open." They must go and look after the people. The Vale of Conway young people could do a deal, both men and women—one could not do without the other. In his large travels in India, in Asia, and other countries, he found that Christians felt :they lmust go out to the people. In Delhi, in a mosque, he did not see a woman in the Temple; but he saw 15,000 men standing like an army of soldiers behind each other, worshipping Mahomet. The women were far behind this scene, and could only hear the echoes of that worship. Unlike such a faith as that, the faith of Jesus Christ was for everyone. Every church ought to have a society for the work of the church. The faith of JJSUS Christ had been said to be four-sqll .re against every wind that blows. The youig people of to-day could not live alone cn books and on singing praises. They mu"t have companionship. It was at 11Lh o- cieties as that which bi ought young peop together that he had made the best friends ifl ever had. The. speaker dwelt in his usual impassioned tones upon the beauties and glories of friendship. Unless one fr:end saw the best in the other there was no real friendship. They must not ex ract the bad, but the good, which was in friends It was the belief in Jesus Christ which had brought people into their pr-ver places snd positions. He remembered, when lie was a child in petticoats, his mother holding him up above the people at a meeting in Menai Bridge to see the divinely illumined face of Henry Rees, and he remembered the impression wrought upon him when he attended that divine's funeral. He (the speaker) was never afraid of people and riches but he confessed that it was the saints in Christ's Church who could see through them. The speaker paid a tribute to an old deacon who had worked on the good he saw in him. There was a spark of good in everyone, which only needed kindl- ing into a flame. Young people could help their ministers, and with the passion of youn-j people could illuminate Christ's re- ligion. And let them not forget the friend- ships which saw only the best in each other, and don't let them as young people make fnn of anything. Let them rather have such high principles of Christian duty that would work for the glory of Christianity. The speaker gave excellent advice as to looking after their bodies as well as their spiritual welfare. He would enjoin young people not to become cynics. Cynics were, he thought, likened to those once-upon-a- time volcanic mountains of France, which had ceased belching forth fire and gave mud instead. THE CYNIC was the human mud volcano. They lived in an age of great thought, and the days of cheap books, and no one nowadays was any good without ideas. Let the young people not forget to read the old books of Wales of a generation ago. Such books were writ- ten by Dr. Lewis Edwards, of Bala, for instance. He was the brightest intellect in Wales in the last generation. There may have been more brilliant writers; but for sanity of thought and genius and getting at the root of a thing, he (the speaker) knew of no one like him. He therefore strongly recommended the young people of Wales to read Dr. Lewis Edwards' works. Then there was Emrys ap Iwan, who had walked Europe, and was acknowledged, in his day, to be the best spiritual sheplherd of the Vale of Clwyd. Let the young people read their Welsh books, and whatever they did let them not lose their Welsh language. Let them not mind if there was a Welsh accent I on their English, and certainly let them not be ashamed of it. Just fancy Sir Walter Scott, Thomas Carlyle, and other famous Scotsmen being ashamed to speak English because of the Scotch accent. Let them speak as true, manly men, and noble, wo- manly women. Germany had organised her national intellect through treating matters properly, and sifting great problems. By this she had produced A NATION OF THINKERS. The great danger in Germany was that in its advancement in such manner she should forget her faith. There were noble scholars in Wales before the rise of the colleges, and the latter were the cause of the rising of the Welsh nation in education. He wished he had time to deal upon another question which was dear to his heart, and that was the need for a revival in their Sunday Schools. The Bible was a bigger Book in the world to-day than ever it was before, and he could prove it. The lay head of the Brahmins, who was not a lover of missioners, had the Ancient and Modern Hymn-book" upon his piano, and the Bible had also its place of honour in his home. Goethe, in the speaker's opinion, was the second great man to Shakespeare, and he had said regarding the Bible, Of all books this is the Book. It is the Book that reads us." The Bible appealed to the servant girl and the slave, and the rich people as well. There was no limit to its comprehensiveness. Shabby, cheap critics had dared to criticise it. Some had referred with scorn to David and his sin, but one great man, who had never declared himself a Christian, had said that this man was conscious of his sin and repented." Good people were good because they had seen their badness and had re- pented. He exhorted the young people to play games of FOOTBALL, GOLF AND HOCKEY in the true spirit. Games were helpful to the development of the body, and the value of plenty of fresh air and healthful recrea- tion could not be overestimated. The great Spurgeon had said when preaching in his London Tabernacle, Open the windows of the Tabernacle. The Gospel of Christ can- not escape through carbonic acid gas." (Laughter.) Christ was the healer of the body and mind long ages before we had our scientific hospitals. Therefore, make the body healthy and let them have sanity all round, for the only thing to save the whole man, body, soul, and spirit, was Christianity. Let them have times of play, and let them play with sense. When Princi- pal Thomas Charles Edwards was at Aber- ystwyth, he became president of the foot- ball -lub. He had said when it was urged that there was something wrong attending the game, I shall be the president." It was known that the Principal was blamed by the Monthly Meeting for his action. But Principal Edwards was right. It was by associating themselves with games which had doubtful concomitants that the minis- ters of our churches could eradicate the evils. The great Dr. Arnold had played the game of football, and his influence amongst the boys must have been in his mastership days such that boys would say We can't tell the Doctor a lie, for he trusts us." Luther did not put games down, but put them under the influence of the clergy. What would they think when he told them that even John Calvin played ball? Games properly played and in their proper season brought forth many good physical attributes and confidence. They should cultivate confidence, but be wary of cheek. Let them read the books of such sweet novelists as Jane Austen, George Meredith, and such writers as they. How beautiful was the sentence in one of Mer- edith's novels, The man who rises from his knees after praying feeling a better man has received an answer to his prayer." Great men and women did not deny the elemental facts about God. It was not sufficient for them to speak nicely about Christ and think that was sufficient for their religion. They must let the inward grip of reality possess their souls and lead lives of purity as they went through the battle of life. Let them think of the prin- ciples that actuated the minds of Charles of Bala, Williams of Pantycelyn, and other such divines and act upon them, then they would become worthy followers of their Lord and Saviour.

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