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Rydal Mount School, Colwyn…

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Rydal Mount School, Colwyn Bay. ANNUAL DISTRIBUTION OF PRIZES. The annual distribution of prizes in connection with Rydal Mount took place on Friday evening. The event is one which is eagerly looked forward to by the pupils and friends, preceeding as it does the Christmas holidays. Notwithstanding the very inclement weather, there was a large attendance in the handsome hall of the noble pile of buildings. Amongst those who accepted invitation to be present were Mr and Mrs Barlow, Mr and Mrs Turner, Mr Cowpe, Mr Bracewell, Mrs Wood, Mr and Mrs Newton, Mr and Mrs Robertson, M. and Mrs J. A. Harrop, Mrs Westbrook, Mr Lancaster, Mr and Mrs Webster Dean, Mr and Mrs Shelly, Mr. and Mrs. J, M. Porter, Mr. and Mrs. Mouls- dale, Rev, J, and Mrs. Briggs, Mrs, Gunton, Mr. and Mrs. Bartlett, Mrs. Hill, Mrs. J. L. Barker, Mr. J. V. Early, Witney Mr. A. E. Sutcliffe, Rev. J. Hornabrook, Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Lewis, Rev. J. Sewell Haworth, Mr. F. G. Simpson, Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Mitchell, Rev. H. and Mrs. Waterworth, Dr. and Mrs. Lord, Mr. and Mrs. Hammond, Miss Hovey, Miss E. Hovey, Rev. T. E. and Mrs Freeman, Mr. and Mrs. Heenan, Mr. and Mrs. Bevan, Mr. and Mrs. E. Douglas, Mrs. and Miss Rhodes, Mr. and Mrs. Plews, Mr. and Mrs. Oldham, Rev. H. and Mrs. Elderkin, the Mis-es Elderkin, Miss I. Tonkin, Mrs. and Miss Pryce-Jones, Mr. W. Pryce-Jones, Mrs. and Miss Harrop, Mr. and Mrs Guest, Rev. J. and Miss Robinson, Rev. T. and Mrs. Lloyd, Mr. and Mrs. Linekar, Mr. and Mrs. Lowe, Mrs. Nuttall, Mr. Glover, Mr. and Mrs. Bradburn, Mr., Mrs., and Miss Chettle, Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Jones, Mr and Mrs. Dicken, Mrs. Little, Miss Clayton, Miss Johns, Mr. and Mrs. Kettlewell, Mr. N. Kettle- well, The Misses Smith, Miss Sowerbutts, Mr. and Miss Barlow, Mrs. and Miss Bell. Mr. J. L. Barker of Bowdon, occupied the chair, and he was supported by the Headmaster, Mr. T. G. Osborn, M.A., J.P., the Rev. F. J. Briggs, and Mr. J. V. Early, of Witney. After the proceedings had been opened with prayer by the Rev. F. J. Briggs, boys capital choir rendered Mendelssohn's part-songs (a) "The Woods," and (b) Early Spring," in a manner which was very much appreciated by the audience. THE HEADMASTER'S REPORT. The Headmaster, on rising to present his report, was received with loud applause. He said that his report would be less formal than in pre- vious years. They did not generally make the matter too formal. He would make a few remarks to the friends who had come on such a disagree- able night to the event, and to them he extended a hearty welcome. The occasion was a peculiar one, and they had not gone far to get a stranger in the chair. It was, therefore, more in the nature of a quiet family gathering. He was glad to see Mr. Barker in the chair, and also to see "old" boys who had done them the honour of being present on the occasion, and some of whom he was glad to say were governors themselves, but were too modest to come on the platform. (Laughter and applause,) They had had a happy year's work, and had got on well together. There had been little difficulties, and a little for- getfulness, but nothing to break the pleasantness of the year. The health ot the school was good, although they had had one or two scares. One boy was taken ill, and they tried to prevent more cases. They did not succeed in preventing that altogether, but they put the pupil at home, and if they did not break up the school they would have had a hospital there. The year had been a year of progress, with special achievements. It was the first time they had been admitted to the Oxford and Cambridge examinations which placed them on a level with the highest school in the Kingdom. They had not taken the highest position, but they had got on well for the first time, and more than half of the successful candi- dates were new, and that was a thing not to be ashamed of. They had got a large proportion through in their examinations. Examinations were one of the most important things in educa- tion. It would not do to undervalue examinations and substitute various devices in their places. Being a master himself he might not be an im- partial judge, but unless some better substitute be found than those suggested it would be bad for children unless they had examinations. In- spection meant taking boys by the class, and unless there was individual culture and work they were not going towards success. Amongst the other substitutes was notification, which was introduced in America, and which had been very successful there, and he could quite believe it. (Laughter). The headmaster could say at the end of the term, such and such has done well, and then he will be sent to the University and have a scholarship. It saved the trouble of examining. It would be very popular amongst his young friends, if they only got the right side of him, and he could assure them it was a very easy matter. (Laughter.) Notification was coming; he could see it coming. He remembered the days when most scholarships at the colleges were not

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