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Liberalism in North Wales.

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Liberalism in North Wales. Colwyn Bay Association and the action of the Lords Mr. R. Thomson, J. P,, on the Budget. Mr. E. R. Davies sounds a Warning Note. On Friday evening the Lecture Hall at Col- wyn Bay was well filled, when Mr. R. Thomson., J.P., delivered an address on Liberal and Tory Finance Contrasted." The meeting was held under the auspices of the Colwyn Bay and District Liberal Associa- tion, and but for the unfavourable weather it is certain that the attendance would have reached even larger proportions. It is evident, however, that local interest in Liberal politics is rapidly increasing, and :t was pleasing to hear Mr E. R. Davies, of Pwllheli, congratulate the Association upon being really alive." THE GREAT CRISIS. Mr T. R. Lewis was in. the chair, and in the course of his remarks said they had met that night at a tremendous constitutional crisis such as the country had not experienced for over two centuries. It had been brought about by the action of the House of Lords in throwing out the Budget. This was quite an unconstitutional I act, but the speaker did not think that they as Liberals were sorry it had been done. (Hear, hear.) Although but a young man, he remem- bered the crisis brought about by the action of the Peers in rejecting the Franchse Bill of '83. Tremendous feeling, was aroused throughout the country, and as a result the House of Lords gave the franchise to the people. But at the present time a still more serious crisis had risen, and he was pleased to think that had been brought about by the demagogue from Wales." (Cheers.) The speaker was sure that the peers would be brought to book, and he hoped before the matter was ended they would be abolished —(hear, hear),—though there might be need of a Second Chamber. Dealing with the claim of the peers that they were the natural leaders of the people, Mr Lewis said that might have been true in feudal times, and perhaps even in the days of the pocket boroughs, but it was no longer true to-dlay. Comtinumng. he said the aim and policy of the Liberal party had always been I towards economy. The last Tory Govemmuini but one indulged in a war that cost the nation two hundred and fifty millions, whereas the pre- sent Government gave Home Rule to South Africa when they had been in power but three years. That was economy. With regard to the controversy of Free Trade and Tariff Reform, Free Trade spelt economy. (Applause.) THE BUDGET AND THE WORKING CLASSES. THE BUDGET AND THE WORKING CLASSES. Mr. R. Thomson, J.P., was received in a most cordial manner and carried the audience with him from beginnling to end of his stirring and interesting speech. We are living, said the speaker, in stirring times. Wd are in the midst of a crisis such as our country has not experienced since the days of Cromwell. We a.re at the threshold of a most momentous political struggle. Our political liberty is at stake. (Hear, hear.) Our self-gov- ernment as a people is in danger. The inde- pendent character of the People's House, the tlcHuse of Commons, is assailed. (" Shame.") The issue is Who shall rule, the Hereditary House of Lords or the free elected representa- tives of the people, who shall have the financial control in the realm, and. with the financial con- trol, the making and unmaking of governments. (Cheers.) This is the tremendous issue. We are going to make history. (Hear, hear.) We are, I hope, going to make perfectly clear to those lordly usurpers that never again—(cheers) —shall they with impunity encroach upon our rights, or try to filch from us our liberties, or rights, or try to filch from us our liberties, or paralyse Liberal Governments in a Liberal House of Commons. (Renewed cheers.) MR. LLOYD GEORGE AS A "KNIGHT ERRANT." National finance is the tragic theme of the, day. The Chancellor of the Exchequer—(hear, hear),—-the little Welshman from the Welsh bills—'(laughter and ch,eer;&),-tie best abused man in EniglaTid-(renew-ed laughter)—is our knight errant in this great fight. (Applause.) Not a wandering knight as of yore, but a bold, gallant k-night-(hear, hear),—who shall pro- claim combat to all who shall dare to encroach on the people's do-mains. (Applause.) When I engaged to speak tonight on. Liberal and Tory finance, I had no idea that I should be dealing with a subject of such tragic importance, and, notwithstanding the electrical nature of the poli- tical atmosphere, I shall still pursue the path I had marked out for myself several months ago. Ordinarily one cannot call upon the heroics in dealing with finance. Figures always seem pro- saic. In the past, only a Gladstone among us men—(hear, hear),—was able to make them live and become interesting, and only a Lloyd George has succeeded in making them glow with humanity and pulsate with life. (Applause.) But, after all, I consider it our duty as Liberals to make ourselves acquainted with our national finances, because, in a large measure, the pro- gress, the well-being, and the nrosperity of oiut people depend upon a wise handling of our national income and expenditure. ('Hear, hear.) A wise and far-seeing national policy lies at the very root of national expenditure. A COMPARISON. In the past, the Liberal policy abroad has been peace amongst the nations, friendship to- wards other people, and our national expendi- ture has reflected that spirit, and has in conse- quence been of a moderate character. (Hear, hear.) At home, retrenchment and reform has been and still is the Liberal watchword. (Ap- plause.) The Tory policy abroad, on the other hand, has been of the Jingo type-(laughrer),- cleverly characterised by the late Lord Carnar- von as England strutting down the High-street

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Liberalism in North Wales.