Hide Articles List

11 articles on this Page

[No title]

RESULTS AT A GLANCE.

WELSH AMATEUR CUP.

News
Cite
Share

WELSH AMATEUR CUP. THE FINAL AT COLWYN BAY. CARNARVON UNITED v. OAK ALYN ROVERS. THE CANARIES WIN A POPULAR VICTORY. (BY "VIGILANT.") The caprices of April showers were never mcKre evident than on Saturday. They were truily xwrhkind to the combatants too- the securing of the We;1sh Amateur Cup—which, to give it its old and more popular name, the Welsh Junior CUip-amd the goodly niuimfoei of people that de- sired to see the struggle. The downfall was pitiless, and the heiavens were weeping copious- ly, to the great disappointment of those who had anticipated a good match. If for a time the showers ceased they renewed themselves so frequently that a large number of spectafors who had come unprepared must have been, drenched to the skin. And the showers were just the fac- tor to make the Colwyn Bay enclosure assume its ugliest mood. It is clayey, and so wretched- ly drained that no, match in wet weather is hardLy worth, seeing thereon. Heartfelt sym- pathy went out to. the respective goalkeepers, who were planted in a sea of mud, and never, T should think, would they feel more glad than when the go minJThtes were up. One cannot help refraining here from refer- ring to the most inexplicable action of the Welsh Football Association in their handling of this final. The historical protest of Aberystwyth will for a long while remain. a. mystery to those not in the know. I sympathise very much with the Canaries, who were put to such expense as to take several witnesses to Shrewsbury, forsooth! to have the protest re-heard. We on the North Wales Coast have very little Knowledge of the doings Wrexham way, and this fact alone is a strong argument for more representation on, the Welsh Council for Coast football. However, the thing is now over, and the cup has been worn by the good old Canaries after much vex- atious worry. Another fact is that although the gate under such distressing circumstances was, I understood, over £15, one wonders what it would have been the Saturday previous at Llan- dudno, when people were full of excitement abouft the match. The match was under the control of Mr. Alf. Slater, of Llandudno, who commanded the esteeim of all by his firm and judicious ruling. He was assisted by Mr- Tom Jones, of Holy- well, and Ma-. Meir, of Colwyn Bay, as lines- men, and there were several members of the Welsh Football Association present, amongst whom was My. Nunnerley, who represented the President of the parent Association, and pre- sented the cup on his behalf at the close of the match. A novel feature on the ground was the placing of an omnibus on the west end of the ground, which proved a blessing to. several who would otherwise have been drenched by the rain. The following were the sides: — Carnarvon United G. H. Jones, goal; Evan Hughes and Albert Griffiths, backs; Johnny Griffiths, Mick Herbert, and J. Williams, halves; R. H. Roberts (captain), Tommy Ro- berts, Walter Jones, Hug-hie Roberts, and E. R. Jones, forwards. Oak Alyn Rovers: R. J. Roberts, goal (cap- tain) S. Davies and E. Davies, backs Ivor Jones, Emlyn Jones, and James Martin, halves Oswald Lewis, E. Jones, Morris Rowlands, George Baugh, and T. Green, forwards. < < It will be observed that Johnnie Jones was massing from his accustomed place of outside left for the Canaries, through iniuries, and an excellent deputy was found in E. R. Jones, who- is a very promising and skilful player. Morris Rowlands, the pivot for the Oaks, had played in that position in several matches for Beau- maris this season. ti There were hardly anv Oak supporters on the ground, whilst the Canaries had a very con- siderable following, and who made tham^elvtw known by encouraging shouts for the yellow ones. Carnarvon', carried the horse-shoe mascot with them that they secured from the Llandudno Amateurs-' ground, and they have become semi- superstitious as to. the luck attached t0' it. Whether they were in any sexiousness or not to be attached to such things, the fact remains that the Canaries have done well since they obtained it. A conspicuous thing upon, the upper side of the ground was an open sunshade of blue and white sections with the Oak Alyn name thereon, and this emblem of encouragement after the match was sported with much relish by juvenile street newsvendors. Theie was a touch of pathos in that reminiscent of the flight of the enemy who had left the trophy behind. The Canaries were donned in their pretty jerseys of claret and. blue, whilst the Oak Alyn boys, a very fine and sturdy lot, looked very neat in white jerseys and delicate pale blue knickers. The Oaks won the toss, and decided to play down the slope towards Penrhos College. Walter Jones kicked off, and excitement com- menced. Few knew anything about the calibre of the Oaks, and their opening movements were watched with more than ordinary interest. I ought to say that under such wretched condi- tions, where pools of water were in the centre of the field, and the ball dropping dead therein, and the water splashing up to the players' faces, the game was either sides. The correct game— however alever both sides might be'—was im- passible. And so after some give and take play Morris Rowlands went through and tried his luck with a long pot shot that flew over the bar. This seemed to stimulate the Canaries, who, by excellent footwork, which was really clever Iqpvm. such a ground, worked themselves up the field and looked dangerous. By luck they were cleared out, and two fouls against the yellow ones saw the Oaks have a spell of advantage. But their work was disappointing. We all seemed to expect what never was seen, i.e., foot- work worthy of showing that the Oaks were good finalists. On the other hand, the play of Carnarvon was persistent and go-ahead. E. R. Jones, securing, diddled an Oak defender, and centred beautifully, and although, the Davieses were defending as best they could one of them had the mortification of seeing the ball glide like lightning from his body into the net. This greatly cheered the Canaries and their sup- porters, and. there were loud cheers. It seemed just the tonic necessary for Carnarvon, for whilst Oak Alyn made attempts to equalise they never seemed likely to do it up to this .point, and the yellow ones forced the game with vigour and persistency. Walter Jones sent from almost midfielid a high dropping shot into goal. Ro- berts came out to meet it. The ball bounced in front of him, and went over his head into the net. Evidently Carnarvon had studied the fact that on such a day that was the most likely way to win, and it was. To be two goals in arrear comparatively early in the match was a bitter pill for the OaSkis, and the reverse for the time being seemed to, nonplus them. Having some- what revived later on. from the shock, the Oaks pressed awhile, and a fine attempt hit the right post and rebounded into play, and desperate efforts were made to net the ball; but the fates were against the Oaks, and a narrow squeak of the downfall of G. H. Jones's charge was seen. The Canaries, however, breathed again when the ball was got out of danger. » Now the Canaries show us some fine combina- tion a la the match at Bangor when they beat the cityites in this same competition. It was pleasing to behold it. It was clean, clever, and bewildering to the other side, who could onily make spasmodic rushes until, catching the de- fence of the Canaries in. a weak moment, Morris Rowlands made a break through the defence, and with a fast skidding grounder beat G. H. Jones to the world. And after many incidents of an exciting nature half time arrived with the score Carnarvon, 2 Oak Alyn, 1. The Canaries, in the second half, having the advantage of the slope, were expected to add to their score. Others thought it might be possible that the Oaks would show their true form—for a gentleman that had seen the Oaks play pre- viously said they were not doing so—in this half. But they did not. Far from it, save to- wards the close for a few minutes. It was not very long before the Canaries had added a third to their number, and this success seemed to settle the question in the minds of many who were seen to leave the field. Still the battle was waged in another pitiless downpour, and Mr. Slater, who was bareheaded., as is his- wont in., sunshine, snow, or rai-n-N,a,s seen to have, like the players, miniature brooks running down their faces and necks. Talk about your heroes. Are not these the heroes of sport? Call them what you like, and I am one of them, the cuilt of football enthusiasm has virtues of its own.

Advertising

[No title]

COAST SENIOR LEAGUE.

BEAUMARIS v. COLWYN BAY.

Football Chips.

Advertising

Advertising

Football Chips.