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Notes and News. New York is evidently enjoying summer weather, but London is still under a Polar spell. The House of Lords is very anxious to secure a religious census. It evidently has not lost its faith in the people. Although the final passing of the Budget has been postponed till November, it is admitted on all hands that it will suffer but little opposition from either the Irish or the Tories. The dangers of aviation was terribly demonstrated last Tuesday, when the Hon. C. S. Rolls met with such a disaster that proved fatal in a few seconds. The conquest of the air is yet a far-off thing. The Hon. C. S. Rolls was the third son of the first Baron Llangattock, and his mother, Lady Llangattock, is a daughter of Sir Charles Fitzroy Maclean, chief of the clan of Maclean. The family residence is in Mon- mouthshire. Choirs from Cardiff and Mountain Ash secured second prizes at the Crystal Palace last Saturday in the great Temperance Choral contest. The holiday season has commenced in earnest. There has been a big incursion of holiday makers into the Welsh health resorts these last few days. The weather has also undergone a change for the better. Many Celt readers are undoubtedly familiar with the well-known hymn, Father, I know that all my Life is portioned out for me." The authoress, Miss Anna Letitia Waring, of Clifton, Bristol, who died on the 10th of May last, at the age of 86 years, has left estate of the gross value of £ 15,461 2a. lOd. The whole of the Newport reservoirs at Ynys-y-Fro and Pant-yr-Eos have now been fitted with mechanical filters at a cost of about 113,000, and in addition to a pure supply, Newport is in the fortunate position of having an adequate supply of water. Mr. W. George, brother of Mr. D. Lloyd George, will be married on Saturday, July 23rd, to Miss Anita Williams, only daughter of the Jate Captain Williams and Mrs. Williams, Cefn y dre, Fishguard. The interesting ceremony is to take place at Hermon Baptist Church. Mr. Lloyd George will be the best man. Needless to state, the happy event is creating a great amount of interest in Pembrokeshire. Instruction in First Aid appears to be deservedly popular in the Welsh Colliery districts. There are, it is reported, in the Rhondda valleys alone 3,000 men who hold the certificate of the St. John Ambulance Association, and a third station for this district belonging to the Association is about to be erected at Porth, the cost of which, about 15,000, is to be borne by the colliery proprietors. There is talk also of a station being established at Swansea for the western colliery district and one at Tondu for Garw, Ogmore, and Llynvi valleys. Public Health Laboratories have proved of considerable utility in many busy com- mercial centres in the examination of sewage, of public water-supplies, and of samples of food, such as milk, meat, &c. The Cardiff Public Health Laboratory was instituted in 1899, and there is now a movement on foot to establish one in Swansea, where it is thought that it will be of distinct additional benefit in the investigation of industrial diseases incident to the district, such as plumbism, nickel poisoning, and affections connected with the manufacture of patent fuel. It will be remembered that we gave publicity recently to a strongly-worded pro- test sent by the Gaelic League of Dublin to the Senate of the National University of Ireland because the Senate had declined to make the Irish language an essential sub- ject in Matriculation examinations. Since that time a recommendation in favour of the object so dear to the hearts of the Gaelic League has been laid before the Chancellor and Senate of the University by a deputa- tion of the General Council of the County Councils, which offered special scholarships if the recommendation were adopted. The upshot of all this has been that the Senate has given way, and so the Irish language becomes a compulsory subject at Matricula- tion examinations. There has nevertheless been much opposition to this course, the opponents to its adoption urging that it will prevent many students from entering for the examinations of the National University of Ireland.