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Notes and News. THE holiday season has evidently upset even the linotype. Here is an extract from the report of a marriage in the last issue of an Aberystwyth paper :— The gifts of the bridegroom to the Mount Zion, drove in brakes to Aber- porth, and had a most delightful picnic." OUR South Wales correspondent hears on good authority' that Sir W. Crossman, the newly knighted Lord Mayor of Cardiff, will be a probable Labour candidate for the representation of Cardiff at the next general election. ONE of the most conservative little towns in Wales is New Quay. With a little expense this pretty place could be greatly improved, but there does not appear to be a progressive man in the locality, with the consequence that New Quay is 100 years behind the times. ANOTHER little town sadly out of date is Aberayron. Here, again, at a comparatively moderate expenditure the place could be made a very interesting resort, but the san- itary arrangements remind one of life in the sixteenth century, and the majority of the inhabitants are sadly lacking in enterprise and modern ideas. SOME caustic letters have appeared in recent issues of the Western Mail in regard to the anglicizing influences of Lampeter College. Of course there has been a denial of the charges, but anyone who has any knowledge at all of Lampeter College knows full well that the establishment is practically pledged to kill Welsh nationality. English professors, English services, and English environment generally, completely deaden the few-very few-Welsh services that are allowed by the courtesy of the authorities. AT Aberystwyth a few days ago there was a Garden Party and Fete in aid of the funds of women's work in connection with the local branch of the Society for the Pro- pagation of the Gospel." The "attractions," we notice, included cocoanut shying," Japanese Trick," and Aunt Sally." A curious method of getting money for the propagation of the Gospel" was it not ? CARDIFF contains 16 Nonconformist chapels where the services are entirely in Welsh, and the Anglicans only one church where the ser- vices are in Welsh. Is there any more eloquent proof of the fact that it is Noncon- formity that keeps the Welsh language alive ? N.B.—This interesting item was Dot, of course, mentioned at the Church Commis- sion sittings. IN Aberystwyth, again, whereas there is only one Anglican church entirely devoted to Welsh services, there are seven Noncon- formist chapels where the services are entirely in Welsh. Facts are stubborn things. THE visit of the Channel Fleet to Aberyst- wyth was a great success. The Jack Tars made an excellent impression, their general conduct being exceptionally good. Moreover they spent money freely in the town, and this fact, after all, is the one that makes the greatest impression upon the Aberystwyth tradesman. It is curious how rare are the visits of war vessels to the Welsh coast. Beyond one or two small second-class cruisers, no British war vessel has visited Cardiff or Swansea ports for the last 50 years! Considering that practically 90 per cent. of the coal used in the British Navy is shipped at Cardi docks it is curious that British war vessels do not visit those ports more often. A PRETTY and commendable compliment was paid by the New Forest (Hampshire) Liberals to Mr. Lloyd-George and Wales at the recent public meeting addressed there by the member for Carnarvon. Fronting the platform was the word Croesaw," in Welsh, and when Mr. Lloyd-George appeared for the purpose of making his speech, the local band played the Welsh National Anthem. This incident shows that many English Liberals are fully alive to the fact that Wales has a living language of its own as well as a national anthem. CARMARTHEN seems to have developed quite a big Eisteddfod all at once. The one held in the ancient Borough on Bank Holi- day was a remarkable success, so well organised was it; and it is now evident that the Carmarthen August Bank Holiday will, in the future, become as important as the Mountain Ash Easter Eisteddfod. We heartily congratulate the Carmarthen friends upon the success of their Eisteddfodic efforts, and shall watch the future development of their annual gathering with great interest.