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Welsh Topics.

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Welsh Topics. Notes and Jottings. Sunday School Work. Taihaearn. Ifano's popular lecture on Talhaearn, the father of the modern Welsh lyric, is in constant demand ever since he first delivered it some years ago before the Merthyr Cymreigyddion Society. Pos- sessing, as Ifano does, the true poetic spirit, he was able to_ set before the audi- ence at the Bethania Young People's Society last week the beauty of Taihacarn's style, his vivacity, and his sarcasm. Dealing as it did with an almost for- gotten genius, who was undoubtedly the first in Wales to set the lyric on firm soil as intensified and glorified in Ceiriog, Ifano is doing a great service in placing Talhaearn in the proder settii-ig he so rightly deserves in Welsh literature. The lecture on TaL," ample as it is in the delineation of that great person, is a lec- ture on growth, the nature, the history of the modern lyric. Ifano's mastery of the elocution and oratory adds to the effectiveness of the selections recited, while the criticism is fair, clear, and sound. Ifano has been invited to deliver the same lecture before the Liverpool Welsh Society. A New Welsh Drama. The latest Wel,sh drama is that of Richard Williams, of Manchester, pub- lished by the 'Educational Publishing Co. It depicts Welsh life sixty years ago, when the desire for knowledge was dawning in the land. It takes a little over two hours to perform, but as it is so simple and easy, and only needs five characters, it can be well adapted by amateurs and literary societies. It is written in the North Wales dialect, but it would be an easy matter for to set it to suit any dialect in Wales. The characters are Tomos; Jones," a hard-working farmer, and his wife, Mali Marian," who is in love with a young farmer, Emrys and Arthur," a brother of Marian, a bright, intelligent youth whose whole soul thirsts for knowledge. The workmanship is very praiseworthy; the drama is homely and forcible, and could easily be adapted by winter societies. Wales and the G.P.O. This is an age of decentralisation. The latest thing on the tapis is that in the decentralisation of the work of the General Post Office Wales is to be ignored. It is being understood that England and Wales is to be divided into five districts, each under the control of a surveyor-general, while Scotland and Ireland are to have one surveyor-general each. These officiaLsI are to possess very extensive powers in the administration of the work within their respective areas without any reference to headquarters. The Cardiff Cymrodorion are protest- ing against this, and claim that Wales, being a separate nation, should be recog- nised as such, as is done in the case of Scotland and Ireland. Already our country has been recognised as a separate nation in the administration of educa- tion when a Welsh Department was created, also in the creation of a Welsh, inspectorate under the Poor Law, also in the appointment of a Welsh Commissioner- ship under the Board of Agriculture, and a surveyorship in connection with the Labour Exchanges. It is only fitting that Wales should possess its own surveyor-general in just the same way as Scotland and Ireland are treated. I The London Eisteddfod. The National Eisteddfod of this year proved a financial success. The. last com- mittee to close the accounts was held last week. The receipts amounted to tS,934, and the expenses to C3,604, leaving a balance of some E330. Half of this goes by agreement to the National Eisteddfod Association; the other half was divided as follows — £ 80 to Eisteddfod Associa- tion, k50 towards forming an Eistedd- fodol Library, to be housed at the Welsh Club, £ 25 to the Eisteddfod Choral Society, and R10 towards the Welsh poor of London. Sunday School Work. I Ever since the visit of Mr. Hamilton Archibald, of the Bournville Training Institute, to Ton and Treorchy, Sunday School workers have been keenly discuss- ing his system, and the methods of Sun- day School teaching in general. His visit has been followed by one of his lady teachers, Miss Wallis, who is conducting a series of addresses on the method of carrying on the Primary Department of this system. The visits of these two have set many thinking, and particularly so as to how far can be applied to and extended in, the Welsh Sunday Schools. That Welsh Sunday Schools are passing through a crisis is an undeniable fact, and that there is need of reform is also a crying need; yet whatever system is adopted, it must first of all answer to our national needs. Ullike England, we have a complete and connected system of education. The progress of our secondary and higher education is making itself felt in the Sunday School. This reflex action has to be coped with in a manner which does not affect English Sunday Schools. Our pupils from the Intermediate Schools and from the University Colleges are being trained into methods of historical re- search, and are able to grapple with ques- tions of historical criticism and scientific research with a minuteness unknown per- haps to the stoical English mind. Again, our Sunday Schools have been the mental training ground of our youths they have been the channels along which our chil- dren have been trained into keen logicians; in short, the Sunday Schools have been the colleges of the. people. That we need new enthusiasm and fresh inspiration for the work goes with- out saying, but we maintain, and that in the strongest manner, that whatever changes take place, they must be on lines which are consonant with the spirit, the aspiration, and the ideal of the nation. No method will be satisfactory to us unless it secures for us a thorough teach- ing in, and the preservation of, the Welsh L

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Welsh Topics.