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A SPLENDID WORKER FOR PEACE.

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A SPLENDID WORKER FOR PEACE. Sir Randal Cremer's work in the cause of peace found proper recognition in the award to him of the Nobel Prize in the year 1903, but the Hague Conferencee were the true crown of his life's work. In Sir Randal Cremer: Hie Life and Work," by Howard Evans (Fisher Unwin), a remarkable story is told of the beginnings of this man, and of his work, whose career was a good modern exemplification of the force of self- help. In the House of Commons, during a de- bate on a tax on corn, he once drew a graphic picture of the pitiful struggle of his early days: He said that when his mother, who kept a dame school, had only five or six shillings a week on which to keep herself, him, and his two sisters, a two-pound loaf cost eightpence. For breakfast the children had three thin slices of bread with a very thin scraping of butter, and a cup of tea without milk or sugar. Dinner consisted of boiled duff-flour and water stirred together and boiled like a pudding-with pota- toes, and perhaps once a week an ounce or two of meat. The tea was like the breakfast, and usually the children had to go to bed without supper, hungry as wolves. Naturally the boy grew wan and pinched, and the old grandmother used to say, Ah, Harriet, I am afraid you will never save that poor boy." A kindly gift of flannel shirts from the parson, as Cremer be- lieved, really saved the boy's life. At the age of twelve he began to work, as pitch-boy in a shipyard, earning two shillings a week. The hours were from six to six during six days. It was a rough-and-tumble life, but it was in the open air and his health began to mend. A few years later he was apprenticed to an uncle in the building trade. He says: One evening there was a lecture on "Peace," probably given by a lecturer of the original Peace Society. The speaker advocated the settle- ment of international disputes by peaceful means instead of war. I listened with rapt attention, and next day I discussed the matter with two or three ehopmates who had been present. They pooh-poohed the idea, and declared that the world had always settled its disputes by force and would continue to do so. That lecture sowed the seed of International Arbitration in my mind, though the word arbitration" had hardly been heard.

FROUDE IN THREE SENTENCES.

ANTHONY TROLLOPE AT HOME.

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Maesteg.

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RANDOM READINGS.t

A DEALER IN DISILLUSION.

SPIRIT-DRAWINGS.

CONCERNING BOASTING.

-----TWO POINTS OF VIEW.

THE FRUITS OF THE EARTH.

IN REAL LIFE.I

Opening; of New Empire, Tonypandy.…

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BITS FROM BOOKS.

JUSTICE TO SLOWCOMBE.

Rhondda Student's Success.

The Extra Hour Test Case.

----Fatality at Trehavod Pit.

ANTHONY TROLLOPE AT HOME.