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--_._-_---Letters to the Editor.…

--+-The Incorporation of the…

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--+- The Incorporation of the Rhondda. To the Editor of the Rhondda Leader." Sir, --Accoi.-di i-i to the report of the meeting held at Richards' Hall last week to inaugurate a movement in favour of Incorporating the Rhondda, it seems to me that the realisation of such an object is in the remote future. The object has never been felt a necessity by the Rhon- dda ratepayers. It appears that no mem- ber of the Mid-Rhondda Chamber knew the least about the subject, especially those who favoured the idea. Councillor James Evans seemed to be the only gentleman who knew anything about the subject, and he wisely enough expressed himself against the movement. The ques- tion was so strange, complicated and mysterious that the Chamber was com- pelled to engage the services of the Simons and Isaacs of Merthyr to explain the advantages of Incorporation to them. Additional powers of local government should be felt a necessity by the Rhondda ratepayers before the Council should move in the matter. The question should be adequately discussed and a preponder- ance of opinion in its favour before the dreamland of local government should be fought for. The fact that Mertliyr has fought for. The fact that Mertliyr has obtained a Charter of Incorporation is not a sufficient reason for the Rhondda to be invested with the same powers. The Rhondda ratepayers should, firstly, be- come convinced that the large powers already possessed by the District Council are inadequate to meet the .special needs of the area which it already covers. Secondly, whether all the Special Acts of Parliament relative to health and educa- tion which have been adopted by the Dis- trict Council are administered with fair- ness and without prejudice in every por- tion of the district. Thirdly, whether a more efficient representation on the pre- sent Council, even with more limited powers of self-government, could make the Rhondda a much more pleasant place to live in" ? Fourthly, whether the larger powers which are invested in a Borough Council grants to the general rate^nvers better advantages to obtain improved cottage surroundings to the same extent as the present existing powers gives to the dwellings of the well- to-do and those of the Council represen- tatives. Fifthly, they should point out to the ratepayers the disadvantages of the Local Government Act to successfully cope with present-day requirements. Councillor Tom Evans complained very bitterly that the Council did not get sufficient work to do. His. desire was that secondary education should come under the wing of the Rhondda Coun- cil." Everyone who has paid the least attention to the education problem, is convinced of the necessity of an Educa- tion Board consisting of men better quali- fied in educational matters than mere dabblers in sewers and tar-spraying. The present Council contributes thousands of pounds freely towards the Intermediate Schools, but they cannot afford, or do not wish to make a decent footpath from the Dinas Bridge to Cemetery Road for the children of Dinas and Penygraig to walk dry-footed to such places. It seems, after all, that the power's they already possess are almost unlimited, and the ratepayers should be well advised to caution their representatives not to squander their money on the vagaries of a Charter. Another point which the ratepayers should be enlightened upon is the state- ment made by Mr. J. D. Williams, D.C., to the effect that the Council contributed yearly the sum of £ 19,882 to the County Council, and that they received in return towards the rates and local roads the sum of 99,882. Councillor Tom Evans stated that the Rhondda Council contributed the sum of E40,000 to the County Council, and received in return one-fifth of that amount." Where lies the truth? Mr. Williams also stated that the Council had considered the matter three years ago, but the Council's water supply was so poor that they failed to sustain a case for a Charter. It will not be altogether strange to the worthy Councillor to know that every department under the Coun- cil's supervision will be equally lacking when the opposition party to a Charter will have their tale to tell. It is to be hoped, on behalf of the already heavily rated Rhondda ratepayers, that before the Council will begin to embark on such a wild-goose chase that stronger arguments and facts, will be in store for the pro- moters. Is it possible for a Council who paid such a fabulous price for an old tumbled- down, second-hand Gas and Water Supply to be ever entrusted with greater powers? Parliament very recently refused to trust them with powers to manage a Tramway System. A preference was shown even to Jewish financiers, and this wonderful Council presented them freely with almost every inch of the highway from Hafod to Treherbert. It is to be hoped that when the wise men of Merthyr will again visit Tony- pandy on the same mission, they will bring with them the annual balance sheet of the Merthyr Council from the year 11897 to the year 1905. to give proofs that the Charter did only cost the Merthyr ratepayers the sum of £ 3,000, because there is a suspicion abroad that all the lawyers and barristers were not slumber- ing during those years. Again, to show the Rhondda ratepayers that a re- assessment of the Borough was not neces- sary in order to make the general rate appear as reduced to the amount stated by them.—Yours, &c., ANTI-HUMBUG.

--Utah Mormonism.

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--+--The Church Congress,

Sanitary Accommodation at…

-------------__---_-A Mother's…

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--Utah Mormonism.