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Our Short Serial. The Doctor's Diagnosis. CHAPTER IV. "Un going out to the verandah next morning, Jack was met by the doctor. "Good morning, Woodcourt; how's the arm? "Good morning, doctor; much easier, thanks. How is Mr. Maritz? As well as can be expected. Recovered consciousness soon after you retired. Quiet is essential. Though hale, he is old. Take some time to recover. I have a piece of good news for you," he went on. Your horse was found at daybreak grazing on tile river bank, and is now safe in a shed at the back. Though wet, your instruments are undamaged. And now for breakfast. Come along, I have a tiger's appetite." While they were speaking, Jack kept looking about him and paid little atten- tion to the doctor's talk, answering abstractedly. He seated himself opposite the doctor at the table, and gazed through the doorway into the hall. The doctor noticed this. We shall have to help ourselves Woodcourt," he said. I have just ordered Miss Louise to her room to rest. She was quite done up with anxiety." Jack's face immediately expressed the disappointment he felt at hearing; that he was not likely to see her before he left. It was for some signs of her he had been looking so intently about him. He was moody at breakfast and could not drive her from his thoughts, and listened desultorily to the doctor's lively conver- sation. After breakfast he went to see the horses. He found that several had ♦been sightly but-nedi by the falling thatch. Having procured some of the necessary remedies from the stable, he directed a native how to aoply them, and stood by, constantly glancing towards the house. Presently, the doctor came strolling up. When Jack heard his footsteps, he glanced quickly round with an expectant look on his face, but when he saw it was the doctor, resumed his former gloomy ex- pression. He lingered and chatted about the horses, continually looking towards the house, and postponed his departure as long as possible. At length, however, when he had treated all the horses and had no further excuse for remaining, he ordered his horse, and with a Good morning, doctor," and a final long stare at the house, rode away. The doctor, wondered what made Jack so glum, and after a stroll around the outhouses, returned to the house. He stepped on to the verandah, where he saw Louise sitting in a. low basket-chair. He took a chair opposite to her and remarked that Jack had just gone home. Mr. Woodcourt gone! "Yes; did you wish to see him? '• No-that is—yes," she answered, con- fusedly. I—wanted to thank him. Is his arm better'? I am sure he must be feeling the effects of last night's painful experiences." "Not a bit of it, my dear girl. He is quite fit, I assure you. Take a lot of buffeting to knock up Jack Woodcourt." Right down good fellow, too," lie added; and rambled on about Jack. She listened with interest. Evidently, her curiosity was aroused in his good-looking, manly friend, thought the doctor. Keen Inan of the world as he was, the doctor observed this, and! kept her curiosity alive by only hinting at those points of Jack's history on which he thought her curiosity most desired gratification. He rambled on for some time, noting her interested attitude, then all at once irrelevantly changed the subject. The girl's attention as suddenly ceased, and after a few desultory remarks, went thoughtfully into the house. This did not escape the wily, doctor, and he chuckled. 11 unl! Let me see," he murmured. Handsome, courteous str'anger drops from clouds. Shows pluck and resource. Suffers pain in silence for father. Curiosity aroused—interest displayed. Youthful imagination makes him hero. Decided first symptoms! Jack moody. Lingers over horses. Desultory in con- densation. Expectant face on hearing footsteps. Disappointed. More first symptoms! Um! I see. Symptoms plentiful. Might result in a case—for the parson! Fine match, too." Thus he summed up the symptoms of embryonic love displayed by Louise and Jack, and diagnosed them as he would Oil examining a patient down with a fever. • Still smiling, he walked in, and after in looking at old Jan, took his depar- ture. He had mounted and was about to ride away, when Louise called, and came running out. Will you carry a message for me, doctor?" Certainly, Miss Louise." Please ask Mr. Woodcourt if he will continue to look after the horses for us. My father will be anxious about them." "Oh, but I forgot," she added. "His arm! "It will do Woodcourt's arm no injury to ride out here. and the boys can do the work as he directs them. But have ypu no friends who would attend to them? What about Willem Morkel? Oh, 110," she said, hastily. E'r—I thought—Mr. Woodcourt is so clever. *sn't he? "Ah! Is he?" said the tantalising doctor. Very well, I'll tell him. Good ■H'ning," and he rode away. When he was some distance from the touse he laughed heartily. More symptoms. Temperature rises," Said he, amusingly continuing his simile. W oodcourt." said the doctor to Jack \vhen he called to deliver Louise's mes- ^ge, Miss Maritz wants to know if you continue to look after the horses." I Certainly, I will," said Jack, with Alacrity. I'll go up to-to-morrow." Thought so. Nearly said to-day.' Confirmatory symptoms. Heart disease, Without doubt. Hope old Maritz won't fdminister paternal shock. Might prove atal. See what I can do." Jack rode out to the farm every day, ?ften accompanied by the (joctor, who tUS had every opportunity of observing e symptoms develop." And they developed rapidly. Jack Y yer lost an opportunity of being in i Rise's company, and his betrayed Louise, on her part, while the f„.c-jtor attended to her father, never slip out of the house to the

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Our Short Serial.