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The Doming Elections.! -

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The Doming Elections. Some Lazy Thoughts. [BY TIRED Last week, I was only able to deal with the contested Wards in our district this week I propose to indulge in a, few reflec- tions on the men who have been allowed a walk-over in the five uncontested Wards. Before proceeding further, I wish to enter a protest against the manner in which your printer sought to enrich my limited vocabulary. I contess thnt my knowledge of the King's En0n i is by no means as extensive as it mi0 it be, but my failing was never hrought home to me with such force as when I attempted to extract my meaning out of the distorted words in my last week's effort. What on earth is meant by "gassomeriant" I have been unable to discover. I have searched all the dictionaries at niv command, but each preserves a Sphinx-like silence on this mysterious compound. Gassomeriant for" gossamerical" sounds a trifle funny, but, in the fitness of things, it might bear some relation to the notorious. Auditor's Report, and might constitute an un- witting commentary on the heavy gas wastage that document has disclosed. Again, pansity for 11 paucity is an- other variation which, is as much Greek to me as the characters on a Chinese wizard's parasol. I trust the gentleman who sets up these lines will have a little more regard for the original copy," and leave any revised versions to the lexicographers of the day. Having thus attempted to explain some of the mysterious passages in my last week's article, I proceed with my task. In these matters, it is generally wise to follow the course of the river, and thus I find myself dealing with the unopposed member in Ward 3—Councillor Edward Jones. If my memory serves me right, Mr. Jones has served the constituency as a. member for a period of nine years, and on three occasions he has been returned unopposed. This, in itself, bespeaks the quality of his representation. Though a man of few words—he is seldom heard in the Council Chamber—he, nevertheless, puts in a lot of hard, honest work. This year has been the crowning, year of his representation, for he has succeeded to the chair—a post which he has filled with distinction and credit. In Ward 4. where Dr. Thomas holds supreme sway, it is almost an accepted fact that to supplant him would be like trying to shift a mountain from its base. The thing is impossible. He is so much a part and parcel of the Council, that to try to conceive the Rhondda Parliament minus his presence is like trying to think of daylight without the sun. Whence cornea his popularity? There are two kinds of popularity. There is the popu- larity of the man who has no enemies, the man who links his arm in yours, and brings you into line with his own way of looking at things in spite of yourself. This is the popularity of Mr. Wm. Jones, M.P., and members of all parties in the House of Commons know the potentialities of that arm-grasp. There is also the other kind of popularity-the fascination which a fighter exercises over his followers. They admire his every move, applaud his every thrust, and grow tumultuous over his victories. This is the popularity of Mr. Lloyd George, and herein lies the popu- larity.of the medico-councillor for Ward 4. No sweet-minded man is he when roused to battle; he lulls you not with Eleasant words when he dons his armour; e seeks not your smiles when he is about t,) strike. He is a fighter of battles. Most pleasant of men when the world is on his side, he plants his feet firmly when his sword is crossed, and strikes with an energy that baffles his adversary. He delights in battle, he breathes its very spirit, the clash of arms is music to his ears. Those of us who have seen his prowess displayed cannot but admire his many qualities, and it is these which account for his popularity. Small wonder then that he was given a wide berth on this, as on pa«t occasions! Long before the day of nominations arrived there were rumours giving round the district that his position was going to be challenged. Reso- lutions were passed and notices of motion were tabled declaring war upon the citadel, but when the fateful day arrived, there were none to dispute his supremacy. It is well that this should be so. There is not a man in the Rhondda Council who devotes more time to public work than does he. As a medical man. his wide knowledge of the principles of sanitation and hygiene have always been at the dis- posal of that bodii., whilst his value as an educationist is known far beyond the confines of his adopted heath. He has been the Chairman of the Education Committee since the Council took over the schools under the Education Act of 1902, and present indications point to a still longer tenure of that onerous posi- tion. What the future may bring in its train we do not know, but a Rhondda :0 Education Committee without Dr. Thomas at its head—well, he will very possibly have qualified for his Old Age Pension by then. Last week, I touched upon Councillor R. S. Griffiths' unopposed return for Ward 5. I do not propose to go over the same ground again but merely to remark that the sentiments I then expressed have found a hearty lodgment in the hearts of many of his constituents. I know Mr. Griffiths quite well, and have had, per- haps, far more opportunities to judge of his capabilities than most people, and I say that I do not wish to withdraw or modify any expression that I used last week. He is a man eminently qualified to fill his position—a fact which I have no doubt Clydach Vale electors' have appreciated long ago. Councillor L. P. Griffiths, in Ward 7, is another member who has a long record of useful public service at his back. Mr. Griffiths, perhaps, does not play the same important part in the deliberations of the Council as the two last members I have mentioned, but his work—oftentimes un- ostentatious and concealed from public gaze-bears., the stamp of conscien- tiousness and efficiency. I was more than pained on reading the report of the last Council meeting, when certain irrespon- sible persons sought to cast an aspersion upon his manner of voting, as I happen to know Mr. Griffiths to be one of the most conscientious men on the Council. He has always voted straight, without being subject to outside influence and wire- pullinø, and such aspersions can only be characterised a,s: despicable efforts to damage him in the eyes of the electorate. Fortunately for _Mr. Griffiths, his timely protest- allayed—if indeed there were any- suspicions, and the fact that he has been once more returned unopposed, after a record of public life covering fifteen years, is proof abundant that the confidence of the electors in his integrity remained practically unshaken. Councillor W. T. Davies has also been secured an unopposed return through the withdrawal of Mr. John Hughes (check- weigher). Mr. Davies has just com- delied his apprenticeship as a District Councillor—having: served the Ward for only three years. During these three years he has, no doubt, done useful work in a quiet way, and perhaps the nexit three years will see him loom larger in the public eye. Except for rare pccasions, when the interests of Forth were imme-

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The Doming Elections.! -