Hide Articles List

18 articles on this Page

Family Notices

Cymmep Miners and Agents.

News
Cite
Share

Cymmep Miners and Agents. Hoisy iijeeting at Porth. Vote of Censure Still Remains. Watts-Morgan described as 11 blucher." Another meeting of the Cymmer work- was held on Saturday evening at their Library and Institute, to afford an Opportunity to the miners' agents (Messrs. D. Watts Morgan and Tom Evans.) of explaining away the charges made against them at the Palace meeting on the pre- Vious Sunday. w These charges, as mentioned in our last peek's issue^ were made by Mr. John "lughes (checkweigher), Mr. Cyril Thomas ^treasurer of the lodge), and Mr. Ben Wheeler (secretary of the lodge), and corroborated by various other persons. Mr. John Hughes presided over a very |arg« attendance. The circumstances heading up to the vote of censure were Retailed, and the reasons formulated by the chairman and lodge committee for doing were —(1) That the agents had Remanded and coerced the men at Mrmmer to accept the Trehafod price list for the new seam at the Cymmer Colliery Against the men's will by misleading them with.regard to certain matters; (2) That Promises had been made to the men who ^ere in the new seam that their wages •Should be made up in case the men and the management failed to agree upon allowances--that the men should continue work, and that means would be found Wake up their wages to the same rate -05 was contained in the proposed mini- mum wage clause regarding abnormal places put forward by the Executive ^ouncil; and (3) Mr. D. Watts Morgan was charged with stating to a deputation the Cymmer workmen who had been sent to wait upon him with regard to the men who had left Cymmer at the determination of the notices, that he had sympathy whatever with any men out Mr. D. Watts Morgan, in the course a strong and lengthy speech, said that he had to say was that these state- ments were absolutely untrue; that they no foundation in (substance or in fact. ? proof of the untruthfulness of these charges, he had only to refer them to *he meeting on January 30;th. They (the ^gents) were armed with powers to state -to the men whichever course they adopted \Vould have the full protection and autho- t'ty of the South Wales Miners' Federa- tion. If they as workmen elected to act upon the notices given by the company, and ceased work, he had been authorised to tell them in that case they would be entitled to receive strike pay. On the other hand, if they accepted Mr. Griffiths' only, condition upon which work could be continued, then they had the support of • ? District behind them to protect indi- c™es ° grievances in respect of ^an§ rftr.Z?+e^imen* he said, were clearly January +T?°ld at tlie meetinS 011 advising which the. refPon^blht? °{ absnln+?i« -.n c°urse to take remained The with the general body of men. Grfffi+i courses were: First, Mr. Thos. s }v"0 was representing the in- rlpr-io i Insoles Company—had im+i! emPhaticall,y that work coujld continued unless the workmen of +-> ?e'}m ,would undertake to give tr6 Price a provisional trial. (Mr. Morgan) had been instrumental Prevailing upon Mr. Griffiths not to compel them to sign the list until the question of a clause for a minimum wage +?r abnormal places had been settled in coalfield. On no other terms could Griffiths agree to withdraw the Notices. This was done by him (Mr. Morgan) so that the workmen's light to be-open the question of price list could reserved to some opportune time in .he future and to secure that no pre- judice would be caused by any signatures 11, the list. The other course was that, ..should the workmen fail to see their way .clear to go on working on the foregoing Conditions, the Rhondda District repre- Bentatives had secured the passing of a ehSOlution on the 29th day of January— |he day previous to ,this meeting at the Jralace—providing an allowance for strike pay during the continuance of the dis- pute. In the face of these facts, there- fore, no body of men coulld say that they •had been misled or influenced. With Regard to the course taken by them, he thought it beyond the understanding of ;ny intelligent man. With regard to the second charge made Against him-that of promising to make Up the wages—Mr. Morgan said it was -quite true to say a promise had been tnade to protect those men who would .fall to secure sufficient allowance to make jP their wages; jbut it should be clearly that the promise made was +-L intended to make good any wages ought to be paid: by the Colliery ompany. This idea had never entered ,or grossed his mind during the whole t( y (Interruptions, and shouts of •a* y°u did," &c.). The promise, such was, was made at the very end of ne meeting, juist when the resolution to „l/UrTl to work had been carried by the "Unanimous vote of 2,000 men, and v- that the promise contained ^collection of it was quite distinct— ° the men failing to get sufficient allow- that steps had been taken to get tr>6+i..suPpl ementary money in addition their strike pay, to make them equal

Advertising

District Council Elections.

Death of Mr. J. G. Morgan,…

Visit of Dr. Campbell Morgan…

Coursing at Sully.

.Treorchy.

Ystrad.

Advertising

Musings.

Advertising

AMERICAN HUMOUR.

Tylorstown.

Trealaw.1

Advertising

Cymmep Miners and Agents.

Trealaw.1