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Carmarthen Magistrates and…

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TERRIBLE SORES AND ECZEMA."

CAKMARTHEIS UiVDEli THEI SEARCHLIGHT.…

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CAKMARTHEIS UiVDEli THE SEARCHLIGHT. I £ »>n.o e vne. and sit yon down yon shall not bulge stall not go, till I set you up a glass, Wttere you may see the inmost part of you." —————— SHAKESPEARE. The District Council at Saturday's meet- ing had before them the claim of a mill: r who wanted £1 10s because the building of a brdge had interfered with his busings for three days. Several members professed astcnishment at the amount of the claim, and ultimately they agreed to offer the miller JEI The District Council is not sufficiently wide- awake. T'hc-y should have paid the full amount claimed, and then enquired into the rateable value of the mill. Verb sap. suff. • ft# The condition, of the Carmarthen market is now beyond description. All the approaches to it a.r,t knee deep in mud, so that visitors require little imagination to fancy themselves in the trenches. The lane besides the Bi teller's Arms particularly is almost impassable in wet. weather. The inte-ior of the market itself is in a regular higgledy piggledy conidtion duirng the weekly swine markets. Here you; have men busily engaged laying down slabs of concrete, and there yo>u have three yards off, men wrestling with squealing pigs which object to be placed in the iron pens. If you den't be very careful hens you will fall (}Ver some of the contractor's paraphernalia, and while you are getting clear of those entangle- ments, you bear a warning shout, and on y escape being run down by a cart load of piggies by stepping into a filthy mud pucldle. At present, the place is not much of a success as a market, but it is a. splendid plaicei to go seeking adventures. Mr Jonathan Phillips has pointed out to the Guardians that it would be a good thing for them to go in for keeping pigs. Amongst its othier advantages, this scheme would give the Guardians a splendid opportunity of saving their bacon. Mr Bircham, the Local Government Board Inspector has called the attention of the Guardians to the need of having a qualified cook in the workhouse. The matter has been referred to the Visiting Committee. Possibly, a good many people will point out that such an official has never been hitherto appointed in the workhouse. Quite- true. And I am told that there was a time when thie whole police duty of Carmarthen was done by one man. A good many other things of the same sort might be quoted. We have got however to take- the world as it is, nnl in no department of public life are things progressing so rapidly as in the administ i a- tion of poor law. The time was when the workhouse was not a place where pcop f were expe-eted to live; it was a. place where the-y came to die. Even when the old spirit gradually died out, the old i-leas of the amount of staff required still clings. A few people might suffice to staff an immense establishment when the requirements were not very high; but it will not do nowadays. With the new dietary regulations (to quote merely one item) the work is immensely in- creased. As a matter of fact, the Guardians are' doing with one official less than they used to have. There is no porter on the strength." It may sound a bit, big to have a cook for the workhou-ie, but in an estab- lishment which houses about 100 persons. such an official would not be at all super- fluous. Of course, no doubt, in practice, the lack of proper people to do the household work means that the matron has to see about it. This is a very bad policy. A lady who has to look after an establishment of that size has quite enough to do in the way of general supervision, without having her hands tied by minor duties which ought to be relegated to subordinates. But there is too much of the spirib of Bumble abroad yet, to allow some people to see matters in that light. On Saturday. Mr E. A. Owen exhibited in his winodiv in Nott Square, a mushroom which nearly covered a dinner plate. It was picked by Mr Owen himself as the previous Wednesday (Nov 19th). near St. Clears. A loud voiced hawker was selling almanacs in the street the other evening, and in order to encourage the tardy customers., he at length yelled in stentorian tones "Almanac newydd almanac y miloedd haner gwir, a hanner oelwydd." which being interpreted is "a, new almanac, almanac for the million half true and half, lies." This kind cf im- promptu poetry is quite comma namcngst local hawkers. People get quit(e enthusiastic over the Spanish peasant who can improvise poetry; but we ha,ve hawkers in Carmarthen who can clear out the fag end of the stock 5n their barrow by the improvisation of a few choice penillicm sung in a robust, baritone voice. The sooner the better the Town Council makes bye-laws regulating the use of the reservoir. In the first place, is it or is it not to be used as a trout pond? There are; self- evident objections to anything which will makf such a sheet of water a resort, for crowds: of people. It is a, bit doubtful all the sa.me whether the reservoir would ever becom^a popular fishing riesort. The Cor- poration would not, stock it, except they meant to make something out of it. Then the anglers would have to pay the Fishery Board for the license first, and the Car- marthen Corporation for the fishing after- wards Anglers are hardly likely to do that so long as salmon peel can be had so easily. —m As for people bathing in the water, it is too awful to think of it. If human beings are going to be allowed to do that, I don't see why the reservoir should not 00 used for washing clothes in; and the farmers might find it useful for washing their sheep in. There are many uses which can be found for such a sheet, of water but if these are too much exploited, people may entertain a pre- judice against using it for its legitimate purpose. At the present time, Carmarthen people are prejudiced enough against, water as a bove.rag". without, anything more being done to confirm them in their views. *«• The Carmarthen Borough magistrates have decided that they will not grant a. licence to a. single young woman 22 years of age. As the Bench has before now granted licenses to single vcung women it would be interest- ing to know where they draw the line. There ought to bo some kind of a rule in the matter so that it shall not be left to the individual magistrates to decide in each indi- vidual cac.e—rather an unpleasant duty. Tho simplest. way out of the difficulty would be to fix a.n age' limit--say 30 years of age. That. would finally bar all younger candidates, for likely to come forward and claim to be over no single woman innder 30 years old is ever that age. The last visit of the Rev Hugh Price Hughes to Carmarthen was a couple of years ago, when he preached in Water street chapel in connection with the opening of the Welsh Wesleyan Chapel at, Ebenezer. A report of the sermon appeared in tae Reporter the following week-and in no other paper. This is such a. common cvent, in connection with many meetings that it possesse.1* no special significance. It is facts of this kind which explain the w'ld fury of people who are interested in certain print- ing companies. Political animosity, yect.arian rancour, racial hatred have their seasons; but. commercial hatred is as eternal as the pole star. Whenever you notice anybody particularly anxiou-s to run down the butter made at the farms, always make, a, po;nt of enquiring at Somerset House whether he has shares in a, Butter Factory. This, is impor- tant—literally and metaphorically. Whatever else, the co-operators do, it is hardly likely that they will build a factory at Carmarthen. There is too good a market 'I at Carmarthen, for all farm produce as it is. Milk is sold at the doors and butter, eggs, and poultry fetch about as good prices here as they do in London. It is a matter worth enquiring into why farm produce should in some cases be actually cheaper in Cardiff than in Carmarthen. These thing.- are worth investigation. With regard to' this, can. anybody explain why milk is scarce in country places in Car- marthenshire ? You read in this county of children living in remote rural districts being fed on Swiss condensed m:lk. Now there is something radically wrong when tinned milk is brought all the way from Switzerland to a place where dairy farming is the chief in- dustry. But things of this sort, have ceased to surprise me. I could name more than one house of public entertainment in this county where youi can have tea if you like, but there is always a difficulty about the miik. Ycu can have Ceylon tea, and West Indian sugar, and Scotch marmalade—but they can't get milk, although the whole, landscape is dotted with cows. They're always just out of it when you call. The country people don't seem to mind this; they take their black tea quite con- tentedly. But if you happen to be city bred you have a prejudice in favour of milk in your tea. Often you might as well a.sk for Chartreuse. There is a. big consultation, and after sending messengers round to scour every place within half a. mile, they tell you that they are very sorry but that, they ha ven't. got any milk. In towns it is all right but don't ever go and ask for tea HI a country place without giving them three days notice, and intimating that you have a prejudice in favour of milk. That will give them a chance to get some down from London We are now in the season when the talk is all of dances—the tennis dance, the hockey dance, the football danoe, the cricket dance, fhe ping-pong dance, the croquet dance, the golf dance-dances for tradesmen, dances for snobs, and dances for the rag tag and bob-tail. To anyone who holds old fashioned notions, it seems as if the whole town were waltzing along the primrose path that leads to the everlasting bonfire. But after all, it is quite possible that many of the people who •Lakei life merrily are quite, as good Christians as are the folks who sit at home grumping and prophesying woe to a, genera- tion that has outgrown their gloomy ideas. • There was a debate on t-he, subject of Tobacco at one of the local chapels this week and one lady declared that she approved of smoking, because men who smoked were much nicer than those who didn't. This ii. quite a common observation. Just watch those people who are strict teetotallers, rabid anti-tobacconists, bigoted aganist the reading of entertaining literature, and [prejudiced against any music but the Dead March." Study them in the, mass, and consider what kind of a. world it. would be, which these would have. They haven't any little vices, of course but in nine cases- out of ten, they go through life like so many bears with sore heads. How often do you hear them prising anybody; how often do you hear of them doing something to promote happines.s and joy amongst" their fellowmen how often do you hear of them doing something to benefit their fellowmen ? We have not at all got rid of the people who try" to merit heaven by making earth a hell." ec. As a matter cf fact this is no merit on their part at, all. All such people from St. Anthony right down to the 20th century apostlrs of gloom are really enjoying them- selves in their own peculiar way. There are people who never are happy, except they are miserable. It would be a real torture to them to go to a theatre, or to see people laughing. They pass through life like people who arei worried by some internal disease. With regard to the matter of smoking, there is only one thing to be, guarded against—it must not become a nuisance to others. There are people who use tobacco to such an extent that they carry an atmosphere like a whiff of tu, i bottomless pit with them wherever they go. If they come into a room for five minutes, you have to keep the windows open for the next, week. People like that have no more business to go abroad than if they had been rolling in a manure heap. Plenty- of refined people from King Edward down- wards do smoke, but they don't carry about with them an arema that would tiffie a billy goat. Anybody found walking about the street in that, condition should bo arretted, and conveyed to the police stai on, where they should be detained until they an" com- pletely disinfected and deordorised. It is no use turning up our noses at, bad drains, so long as we tolerate this kind of thing. There was a concert at the Assembly Rooms on Sunday evening. The meeting was packed. As is usual in such cases, there was a silver collection." This, of course, is the usual thing at Sunday concerts but why not face the fact boldly and charge for -idm,i.ion. If it, is right to hold concerts on Sunday, admission by silver collection, it is right to charge for admission as on any other day. The whole thing is a. p:ecü of pretence which is so characteristic of the Briti-.h character. Now in Paris or Berl;n they d have a concert, and charge for it without any pretence; but here we have the fact, but we try to cloak it even to our- selves. A Boer says We must make these black beasts work for us; we'll have slavery." A Briton says "Dearly beloved brethren, can't we devise some method of teaching our benighted coloured brethren tfye dignity of labour ?"—and he makes laws to compel them to work in the mines. We're a wonderful nation. There is a Carmarthen man who has been a good deal worried because somebody has crTeaa a report that he is in the" last stage of consumption." He has been annoyed in consequence in various ways—particularly by death hunters" who want to injure his J life. Tè: best of the story is tha) he isn't in the last st^ge1 of consumption so the ghoui'ch speculators* are liklcy to lose their mCille'J if they risk it. Something is missing in Spilman street. Just when people had -got used to a wrecked steam roller there, it was removed. On Thursday last week it was mended suffi- ciently to admit of its removal. After a good deal of persuasion it, was gob home, although it. seemed determined first to go into the gaol, and afterwards to try con- clusions with the kerbstones on Castle Hill. If this sort of thing is to continue, the steam roller should only be taken out during certain recognised hours, so as to enable the public to take cover "—as they say in warfare. *«* It n said that a private syndicate will be formed in the Spring to promote sports in the Park. On this subject We" s.ays- I Much as we should prefer a thoroughly representative committee of purely voluntary workers giving their services; for the good of the old town, seeing that, such a thing is apparently impossible in Carmarthen, a syndicate or private speculator prepared to p-y the just demands of the Corporation is the next best, thing." No doubt. But this is a. terrible come down from the, wild trumpetings with which I the circus began. The confession that the thing is apparently impossible" is an awful, climb down. Why can't Mr E. A. Rogers, Mr Gowe-r, and ''We" do it them- selves P I am sure that they have a fair field. Is the thing really impossible P Are there not. even three just, men who will work voluntarily for tho" good of the old town." What a beautiful mouth-filling phrase. Doesn't it, sound quite grand. It reads almost like a tract. The number of people who will do any- thing for the good of the old town except in so far as it. is for their own good is very limited it would seem. Much as we should prefer" etc., etc. It may work in Paradise perhaps; but. even these large hearted people with so much of the milk of human kindness, regard it as impossible. What are, the just demands" of the Carmarthen Cor- poration. The price of anything is the amount, it will fetch in an open market. Let the Carmarthen Corporation issue an advertisement of the following character. CARMARTHEN RECREATION GROUND. The Carmarthen Corporation are. prepared to receive tenders for the exclusive right to the Recreation Ground for the three follow- ing days in 1903: Easter Monday, Whit Monday, a.nd August Bank Holiday. The lesee o- lesees will be entitled to all gate money, rents, etc., for the use of the ground on the three days mentioned; they will be required to make good any damage donoe to the Park; and the Corporation will render no assistance except by providing police to keep order. The highest, or any tender not necessarily accepted. Applicants will be re quired to provide security to the satisfaction of the Corporation. Tenders marked "Park" to bo sent etc., etc." Let us have such an advertisement. It is very easy for anybody to say that the Park is worth R120 for one day, or that R21 is too much, or that it ought to be one-third of the gate money. This is too much like the medicine which isi worth a guinea, a box. Throw the thing open to the world, and accept the best offer. That will settle the question very easily. ALETHETA, <>

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