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Carmarthenshire Assizes.

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Carmarthenshire Assizes. Mr Justice A. T. Lawrence arrived at Carmarthen on Firday evening from Lam- peter. He was 'met 'by the usual escort, which accompanied him to his lodgings at Ueheldir. He opened the Assizes at the Guildhall tat 11.15 a.m., on Saturday. His Lordship wa,; accompanied on the Bench by Mr Protboroo-Beymil, of Trewern (the High Sheriff cif Carmarthenshire); Mr A. E. H. Harries, solicitor (Under Sheriff) Mr J. N. W.llliaarjs, Penman (High Sheriff or the County 1 11 of the Borough of Ca'-rimariheii); Mr John L'ew is (Ma\->r of Carmarthen). COUNTY GRAND JURY. The following sii-1ci-ii. on the County Grard Jury: Lieut.-Gen. Sir James Hflls- Johres, V.C., G.C.B., Doliaucothi (foreman) Dr H. J. Lawrence, Naa'herth .Mr A. H. Jones, Pent a'i t Mr J. V. Carbery Pryse- Rice, Llwynybrain; Mr J. W. Gwyiuie- 'Hugflies, Trcgeyb; Mr C. H. Lloyd Fitz- Williaims, Cilgwyjn; Mr W. Lewes Philipps, Clyngwynne; Mr L. A. L. Evans, Panty- cendy Capt. E. C. J en tilings. Gellideg the Rev T. Lewis, Lampeter Velfrey; Mr Joshua Powell, i\1r H. P. Wardle, Mr W. Lewis, and Mr' iL. B. Blake. The Judge in his charge said: I understand that I have to congratulate you on the fact that 'there' are no íhills to he presented to you. I feel that it Imnst. he a matter of eongratu- lat ion to you as much as to me. It is a testimony I think, not to the law- abiding spirit of the inhabitants of this county, but also to the a.clilil,rajb!e manner i,n whidh the justice 'must ,be administered in the co-unity at the various petty sessions. I conigra.tulate you and t,liaiik you for the sacrifice you have miade in attending here to-day. BOROUGH GRAND JURY. The folio-,ring gentlemen were sworn on the Grand Jury if or the. Count v Borough of Carmarthen: Air E. S. Ailem, The Gramma r School foreman); Mr CU. H. Edwards, The Avenue T. D. Lewis, Picton terrace Mr W. S. Mouris, Bridge street Mr W. M-offf^.n Evans, "Srren, Ctjioti". iMr J. Howard Morgan, Architect; Mr James Thomas, Lammas street; Ma* D. Himcls, Own-in; Mr Daniel Lewis, Kinlg; street; Mr D. Williams, Old Curiosity Shnp; Mr D. Maurice Jones. Kerri House Mr A-lIf red Thomas, Maesy prior; -.Ir B. A. Lewis, Moirfa House; Mr D. R. Morgan, Blue street; Mr John Giriffiths, and D. Hush M. Jones. The Judge said: Gentlemen, I have much pleasure in meeting you to-day. I regret very .mÜcJ1 that the airranigeiments do not seem to have been made with any very great forethought for your accomimcdatioai -when you are called into the box. I trust that on a future occasion the officers of the Court will provide a more dignified pla -e for your assembly. Certainly, the Grand Jury should met the hustled im the way that you have been o.n being called into the 'box. Tihere -does not seem to Ibe. amy suitable (place for your accom- modation. I trust that- by next assize arrangements will be made which will enable yon to come to some pant of the court where you can conveniently sit. Gentlemen, I have mot .much to bring before you to-day. There is only one case to come bpfore you, and that is one which give you any difficulty in dealing with;. It is a charge of embezzlement, which, as you ate acquainted with .business yourself, you will readily dis- pose of. The prisoner was employed as a traveller or commission laigent -by the "Welsh- man" .Newspaper and Steam Printing Com- pany, which apparently carries on a printing and a stationery business as wall as a. newspaper. Ho was paid by com- mission, and his expellee were provided for travel li:nig. Unfortunately, after having been in their service for two or three years, it was found that many .accounts which were sent out were already paid. On investiga- tion, it was foiind that they had been paid to the prisoner, and that he had given, the receipts for them and had failed to account to the imairoager of the; company for moneys thus received. On this- 'being brought to his attention he seems to have made some excuse ,and then to have left the town. There are the facts they are very simple; they a re certainly such as should he sent for tri.al by you for the petty jury to see whether the pri-oner can set up any adequate defence for 'Iris conduct. These are the main facts of tlh-e case tehoixv ,is jiotihiiDg in. it which n.^ecl troulble you. If you will retire and consider the case and let roe have the. bill at your convenience I shall be obliged. CIVIL COURT. After the conclusiiom of the crminfal. charge retpOll-lteid elsewhei^ in this issue the Judge proceeded at 3 p.m., to the trial oa a civil owsle This was an action in which the plaintiff was Miss Frances Rees, whilst the defendant was Dr Alfred Thomlafe Evanis Lllamdyssul. Mr J. Lloyd Morgan, K.C., M.P., and Mr W. Llewelyn Williams, M.P., instructed by Mr D. Roy Evans, Newcastle Emlyn, were for the plaintiff, and Mr Ivor Bowen and Mr Bow-en Davies {1insltrulClted by Messrs Evans and Thomas, Lliandyssul, for the defendant. Damages were laid at £500. Mr Llovd Morgan, in hiis opening state- ment, saifd that this Was an action in which the plaintiff claimed damages from the defendant for breach of promise of marriage. The plaintiff at present i,eisitded in France, where she, had held a good position, as govern ess for the last two years, hut at the time in which the jury would be concerned she lived at Llandyssul with her fatner, who was a licensed victualler living at the Union Inn. Defendant was a doctor practising at Llan- dyssul, and both part-ies had practically lived in that, place all their lives, and had known one another for a number of years. They had beeai. on very friendly terms for a number of years., and on January 1st, 1899, defen- danlt made a proposal of marriage to the plaintiff for the first time. This she accepted It was arranged about that time that the marriage should take place in October of the same year. After this they walked put to- gether, he took her for drives, they went to danloes, and they were generally regarded as as an n,gaged couple. In September, 1900, while she was at Cardigan, defendant wrote her a letter from Lliandyssul. The, defendant addressed her iii some of his letters as My Dear Honey Little Kidie" (laughter)—and on (the 20th September he addressed her as "Dear Old Kiddie.—I was glad to hear from you this evening, lainid delighted to find that you have been unable to hto-ld out until Swnday before, wrilting to me." Detfendlaillit continued :— "Next iSaturdiay week will be: the 29th of Seiptemiber, and Seoptellnlbe.r has only 30 days (LangTiit-er) so I don't see why you and I should not have a drive to Fishguard or else where on the 30th. I am dropping coach- huikler a p.c. by same post to say the gig tt ibe complete by the 29th. That is 'right asn it P 1 .enpliotse letter and samples of cloth for cushions and padding (laughter). I do ailot like blue cloith it's far too common-, Everybody seems to have. it. I don't care for leather. It will veny soon get shabbily. Of all I prefer the cloth tiicketted according ly. I know yon will like it, too. Please in form him to pa-int the spriaiigis, eac., a dank green with yellow lines (Iiau.gŒlIter).. I don't want lit to be flashy, but good and in decent taste. I chuckled over the idea of your see- ing coachlbuilder about it. Did he call you missus? (la-nghter). And does he guess how the land lies by this time? (more laughter). I am glad you have fallen: in, love with the gig. I am lookin gforward as anxiously as I can possiMy expeotinig to seeing it. Of course, I don't wlant you to see it. Oh, no." Counsel said there wasi a P.S., I have not anything very poetic to say this evening.' (ilanghter). Mr Ivor Bowen said it must be "Very par- tiouliar" not "poetic." Mr Lloyd Morgan.: Anyliow, he concludes the letter with "Fondly yours, Toim," (laugli ter.) Counsel conrtinuiing, said that defendant on visiting the house was introduced as her future husband, aind was so treated, and on. a Sunday they wont for a drive to some sea- side place in the neighbourhood of Cardigan, On the if:ollowingday defendant returned to Llandyssul, and there was nothing to which attenttion inieed be called until December of that year, When defendant became very ill. Plaintiff returned home, and defendant sent for her. His note, in pencil, to her was as follows:— "Mind come down to-nilghlt. I'm very ill. -ai,ra typhoid, Ibut still very ill. Do come. My sister knows I'm writing you. Come down aibout six, and Davies will show you up to my -rooms straight.—'jLom." There was another pencil letter sent to the Pi,in!tiff "It liisn't typhoid, my dear Fanny. I donH want lettei-s. They hurt mv head, which is awful at Ibest. Come to see me tfi-uight. My sister wiW ibe out from 7 to 9.3f --T'.E." Counsel, rr^uminig, stiated that at first the plaintiff di d not go .to see the defendianit, be- cause cllie thought it was not a right thing to do. hut (later on she went and tooik a lady friend with her. He had a very bad illness —it was typhoid. In Janniaty pVnitlff re- turned to Cardigan, They drove over to- gether and the friendly relations between plaintiff and defendant went on until Jan- oary, 1903, when the plaintiff brcame serious ly ill, and the defendant took her to see a specialist at Swansea, aicoompained by plain- tiff's sister. It was in July of 1903, that i't was arranged that the marriage should take place, and the plaintiff went to Carmarthen -p,, in order to see -a imi-llrincr about her wcddiaiig attire, aind to give ints-tnictioinis to" get every- thing ready for the wedding. On one of these occasion,s defendant went with her and he was- present when the material! for the M ed ding dress was selected at the dressmaker's shop, a.nd he made reference there a'bout his a.ppr-iaehing marriage. However, when the time came, he iba.cked out of it, and did not cany cut his promise. This distressed plaintiff very much and it gave rise to some rather painful scenes. Then the defendant said he would many her after his return from Scot- land, where he was going in order to pursue some course of study at Endinburgh, and he said that withim three weeks after his return from Edinlburgh the marriage Was definitely bo take place, rainifl al.1 preparations were made for the marriage. Defendant even- tually went to S:ooltl/a'nd, and on leaving Llandyssul statiotn. some of his friends saw him off. Tlie plaintiff was present. She ac- comipainied him in. the train as far as Pen- cade-r, and there on parting he kissed her. "jWIhen (he igot to Scotland he wrote her on Sept'emheir G'th frorn his lod/girgs, 47, Forest- road, Edinburgh:— "Now, tell me whiat do you say to coming up and seeing Edin(bu-rgh the same time as I ? I have considerable leisure to show you round the city. We can take an occa- sional steamboat by the Forth, aind see Fortli Bridge, Queen's Ferry, StirH-ing, if you like, and may perhaps take a flying visit to Glas- go down O'yde perhaps even a fly ing trip to the Highlands: I fhanit priess the question, but if you care to come I can get off easily. T s-Itaill be delighted. You may stay a week, or even four weeks. Yoti can get a return tourist ticket at Carmarthen for 30s. You are quite fit to travel alone, and I will meet you there (Oaledonian Station.). There are some lovely things going on at the theatre next, weeik :—'Ran Tov. ,:1,111f1 also Forbes Robertson's "Tlie Light that Faiiled" and Mrs Patrick Campbell iin "The Second Iti-s,. Tanqueray' and 'Joy of Living.' It will be a grand cluance for you to see Scotlland and the theatrical worild. Of course, should you come you must knuckle under to Llandyssul public opinion, and give out Carmarthen, Cardigan, or Dowlais, or London, as your destination. Come wlien- you like. Wire me as follows:—'Evans, care Black, 47, Forest- road, Edinburgh.—Going Dowla's to -day. Writing soon.—Rees.' I shall take that to mean that you shall ibe coming there 5 o'clock that day, and shall meet you here next morn i,ng. Bring your very best clothes as Edin- burgh girls are very swagger." The letter concluded with "lots of love, F., only your sweetheia rt, Toii-n. Counsel said he did not think it was neces- sary at that ctae to make any comments. Defendant wiiote her other letters from Edin burgh, aiii-d returned home a.bont the end of the month.. HaiVimg put off the marriage, which was to have taken place ill Juily, he returned to Wales to fulfil the promise, but hacking once more out of it, there was again a very ipainful scene. In January, 1904, defendant went for a rt-ip to Spain, and dur ing the sea voya-ge wrote:— "It is no earthly good for anybody to think of parting us, dear. We have had too much outside interference to stomach already, and a little iiiore or less is neither here nor there Counsel said that tll jury would quite un- dersLand that rtheplJ,aiin:tiff's friends and those who were inifcoiiestod in her welfare be- gain to pee: that defendant was a man who- was tiriflriing with th girl. It obvious he did not intend to aid the paa-t of an honour- able niaiii, and her relatives got her to go to Cardigan, and' that was what defpm,dan,t meant hv the above letter when he spoke of "panting." He wrote when he was on a ves-vel in the Mediterranean :— "I could not resume my writing as I in- tended to. The captain came and interfered At eight I went to -bed feeling very sleepy, but could not gt off 'thinking of you. So here I ami, 1 amnp lighted and writing to you lying undressed in my bunk. This is the second night (the night before last) that yon have kept 'me awake for hours ,ruft.ør turning in. What is it, dearie? (laughter). Are you in trouble or pain. I hope not, old girl. Now for a description of our crew." He ended th letter with a "GoodAkve, dearie, and lots of kisses (laughter) your old sweetheart, Tom." Them he sa.id, "To ii-iii-d up, dearie, mind go up to Llandyssul before I return. I am wound up to 35 consecutive hugs already breathless atod sweet (laud laughter) and before I return that numlber will be probably increased to hundreds. So, imii-nd, don't miss a treat. I am 'now concentrating my thoughts of sweet- ness Oairght-er) for the 20th of February. I want to 'be home sevc-trall clays before you do come up for the week end, which, of course, you must do that date. Good night, dearie. I stretch out my arms for you (loud laughter) and I dreafm of you every night. Don't you feel it, dearie? Good night and lots of k'saes.. I believe you can safely arrange to visit home on the 13th February 11 that's if you are anxious to get your statuette and yonr views. I am ea-geily losking forward to seeing you .a.nd to feeling your dear iliittle arms around me once again. Don't put off yowir visit home, but do try to meet roe there as soon as possible after I rrive." Counsel stated that in February defendant returned to Llamdyssul, wtere he saw pisin tiff .again. She then went to stay at gan, and on March 6th he wrote her 111 these terms after both had paid a vis4 t-uth? Car mar then llllJilllinelr to select some things for the Aredding. She had dhosen a oertain, pattern for a blouse, and he another, and, in deference to his wishes she gave way to his I cho:ce. To this he referred "If ycni .aire very keen on it, I don't mind buying it. I am very sorry that I over- ruled your wishes in regard to the blue spot- ted stuff at Cannartihien I have 'been think ing since that, you might have taken a keen liking to it and hove been too modest to urge the point. Write Mies Jones and teill her to make it for you. I daresay you won't be overwhelmed with new blouses (laughter). They dom't seem such a big lot, oespecil3.1ily when you have nothing very striking in hand Besides, they'll be useful during the honey- moon." (laughter). Couneell said this Was the third prepara- tion for the marriage, and he refused even- tually once more to ea rry out his promise. The plaintiff got into very distressed oon- ditioin .cnvin.g to defendant's cruelty. On March 9th aefendaialt wrote k' 11^0^ on' cian we do for a house, frlr ™ i t 1 il0l>e 3'ou are not going back ,-i ? i cannot bear your being behind termP I had been "V, ™ 111 to seeing you at Cardigan ■mistress ot al'l you survey." Counsel sarid that after this the letters that; passed between thereaftei- were very few Plaiintiiff refused to bo influenced by anyone! ,aii, (I in August, 1904, in. eonsequence of a letter defendant seint her, she met him by appointment at Cardigan near the garden of the place where she was staying, and the plain tiff would detail the meeting There was a suggestion that sine should run taway with ,him and get. married, and another that she shouM go ia/way for a couple of yeats and he would marry her on her return That latter suggestion she accepted, and later on she went to France. On her way to Llandyssul from Cardigani preparatory to going away she passed through Ceinattih and there saw defendant with a lady and the defendant's sister When he saw plaintiff he ran into a pnblac house simply to hide himself. Plain- tiff went on to, Lllandyssul, and sent a mess- age round to derfendamit aiskiing to call, and to the messenger defendaait said, 'Good God, ,is she, Fanny Rees, come. back?" The mes- senger applied in the affirmative, and the

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Carmarthenshire Assizes.

Carmarthenshire Assizes.