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- EASILY - SPOILT JEWELS.

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A NEW RUSSIAN SECT.

ANGLO-GERMAN RELATIONS.

THE ARMY ESTIMATES.

EDUCATION CONTROL.

THE NIGERIAN RISING.

IMPORTATION OF LIVE CATTLE.

HYPOCRITICAL BIGAMIST.'

EYE SPECIALIST'S PAMPHLETS.

ESCAPE FROM GIPSIES. E.

BABY DROWNED BY BABY,

MIDNIGHT rUNTING TRAGEDY.

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DEATH OF GENERAL GATACRE.

A STORY OF PARNELL.

BLACK AND WHITE IN AFRICA.

-= GRA YE CHARGE AGAINST A…

DEATH OF MR. F. J-. HORNIMAN.I

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THE KING IN TRANCE.

FIRE AT A BALL.

SHARING THE BOOTY.

EXPELLED UNDER THE ALIENS…

SWALLOWED A NAIL.

CHARGE AGAINST A SHIPOWNER.

A RAILWAY TRAGEDY.

INSANE MOTHER'S DEED.

"FOR LADIES ONLY."

HOSPITALS AND OUT-PATIENTS.

PARIS CANAL MYSTERY.

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FACTS AN& fancies.

AMERICAN HCMOUR. "

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AMERICAN HCMOUR. THE PRICE or FAME. f* Here. Togo: come here, -ir. ''Togo want a cracker?" U Hurrah! hurrah! Togo -.v;ns. Togo by A idock." '"Drat that Togo." Remarks like tho above are common, the first application to a dog, the second to a parrot, tho third to a winning, the fourth to a losing race- horse. When Admiral IVWOJ- won the battle of Manila Bay a million dogs and cats and horses were named after him-, and" Dewey. don't kiss me." or ¡ó Come, siti on my lap, Dt>wpy," or What beautiful thir,- legs Dewey has." wero sentences to be heard < crvwhere. But now many of these anil11;JJ are dead, and rhe re- mainder are too old to' get about. an-J thus Dewey. as an animalY no longer strikes the ear. Japan's famous victory is hound tc maka Admiral Togo's name popular among- animals. Pa>t of the price that the yellow seaman is to pav for his fame will be the echoing througti the world of phrases like '-lkar little Togo." and Come, drink your milk. Togo." and Did the bad, bad man kick Togo.'T — M Journal. SDITSEKMS. 5t's a loan that has nc -ret'tsming. The true-st picture of a woman is to be found in a composite of the descriptions of her lover 8on<1 her riva.i. Some people hare ability. V; iet' like goods fr: the piece;: they never maks- ii. 09 into anj- thiwg. A ^vornan tikes to. make a foe h of a man. but ehe doesn't iik." to have him a £-001 of him- seU:]JiJstr1'll V rn-n-^rr >q>t. THE BANKER AND THE"POET. "TT?sis minor poetry seems futile to me." th# banker said. Ait.,bo(l, can turn if oat. A lunatk can write minor peptty. It's only a question of rh-1ws, You sneer at rhyme?." interjected the fat and bald poet: "give me a rhyme for Lvunge. The banker thought for three mintlte.s}, but in vfti-i. lie was stumped. "Try me again." he said. "A Again the banker failed. "A rhyme for wasp.' Nothing doing," said, the banker, iifbr- a long pSuse. 'Gu]f,' month." 'pint." pm. ''By j:tigo! sa.id the banker. "I think of a rhyme for any of these words." The minor pout: tried him with. "huge." (If.pth. wolf, fugue," "lnulb: and bourne." "I'm srnek." confessed the banker "'Minor poetry is harder than 1 thought. Its a, winder to me you fellows a not paid more." We don't care anything about the pay. It's the glory. \Wo' are after." the poet answered; with dignity, But I have been tricking you. For the words that. I gave you there isn't a- rhyme in. the English; tongue.—Philadelphia Bwletin, HrXKS- OF HISTORY. Tonce de Leon had at last discovered that fountain' at eternal youth. "Are you sure that you'll live for -ever 2 earnestly inquired the populace. "Sure. 3Iike." declared Ponce de Lf'OR. Then we want you, to superintend the con- structioj]. of the Paijauif6 Canal."—Pittsburg Post. A FIFTY-CENT EXPERDIEXT, Once upon a time a Brooklyn tobacconist, after deliberating long on the question: "Aro Men Growing 3Iore Honest," stuck a 59-cent piece on the under side of the glass of h;j-show- case and prepared to. keep tab on his nailers. The experiment had been going on for 301 week when a man came in one day and said: Sir. I would smoke. Let me have two cigars for a ri Ickle." With pleasure, sir," was the reply, and the goods were produced. "I observe, sir." continued the customer: after he had got one of his cigars alight, "thai you. have a 50-cent, piece glued to the glasst over there? Just, so'?" What is the object?n "To experiment with mankind." "And what do- your statistics thus far shew?** Out of 200 persons who have come in hero since I set the trap, only ten have failed to ob- serve the- coin and made an attempt to get their paws on it. The number includes men in almost every walk of life. It is painful and yet it is comic to observe their discomfiture as they find the glass between- the coin and their desires." And no doubt you were watching me as 11 stood at. he showcase ? I mu.4 confess that I had an eye on T,!()\]." And y«>u were somewhat puzzled and disap- pointed I did not reach for the fifty? It. is be- cause I have a, better way-a little way of my, own. as follows: And he took from his pocket a stone, smashed the glass, grabbed the «-oin and was out- doors and around the corner L)t,for- the tobacco- nist oould get oven his surprise and raise a yell, RE3IARKS OF A FUNMAKER. For shaking hands with John D. Rockefeller a Tarrytown, N.Y-. street sweeper got Idol. At this rate John has still enough left for 9991,999,999 hanJshak, or thereabouts. A fifteen-dollar-a-week stenographer has been stealing 25dol. a day from her employer. Regards to the express clerk who swiped 10G,000dol., and the broker's clerk who buncoed a bank out of 360,000dol. Special oounsel for the Mutual Life says the insurance system is sick, but too many doctors are around its bedside. Dismiss 'em all, and get a good "family" doctor. It seems that Emperor William handed France an ultimatum with a string attached to it. The Carlisle Indian football player nauwd Kicked-on-rhe-Jaw certainly oug hjr t. be with the President in his plan to reform tHe gane.— Brooklyn Citizen. HE WAS PATERNAL. He was a man about fifty years old. wit-h a fatherly look about him, and as he sat down be- side a woman on a Fulton-street car, h'e said: 3Iy dear woman, I notice that you are carry. fng your purse in your hand. Take my advice and put it in your pocket." I think it is safe enough," she replied, after a. look at him. Bur. there are snatch thieves, my dear—meri who would grab your purse and run if given an opportunity. I myself have witnessed many cases of it." But I have carried my purse this way for vear- she gently protested. "That may be so. but a time will come when you wiil lose it. The way that women carry their purses is a great temptation to the poor cr vicious. I hope you won't think me a meddler, but I feel it my duty to speak to you. Here, aro fourteen passengers in this car." sir." Here am 1. an utter stranger to you. "Yes." Your purse is within reach of my 1-.and." It is." "Suppose I should grab it and run? The con- ductor could not stop me, and not a passenger would follow. By the time you regained your wits I would be on the sidewalk and lost among tho crowd. See?" o. sir. I don't see." replied the woman. The mati on the other side of me is my hus- band. When you came in lie whispered to mo thar you was a confidence man. and to look out for you. and at the first move you made V- would be on to you big-ger'n a house, and land j you on the floor of the car with a. broken neck. 2 think you had better keep very quiet, "ir:" The paternal man flushed up, hitched around uneasily, and then pulled a newspaper from his pocket and began to read .-P, roolzlyn Citizen. PUNISHED THE JUDGE. In the early days of Augusta, 3Iaine. when tho people rode about the country on horseback, a f certain aristocratic judge, riding into town one fi day on his smart horse, was overtaken bv a S neighbour, a poorly-dressed Irishman, riding a « rather rough-looking animal. 8 In the outskirts of the city the two jogged i along side by side, discussing the topics of tho ■ day: but as they neared the town, the proud | judge, thinking it beneath his dignity to be seen 1 in company with Patrick, requested the Irish- man to fall back a little. The quick-witted son of Erin, grasping tho situation. fell back a few paces, and awaited his 8 opportunity for revenge. As they were entering the principaT street, the Irishman called out ^from behind: "Judge am I far enough behind yen- honour?" The discomfited judge, sitting very erect, paid no heed to the Irishman. A little further on Patrick again called out. to the intense amusement of the bystanders: "Judge —— arn I far enough behind yor honour now. sir. So an along the way Patrick punished th& s nroud judge.—Tlofton Herald.

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- EASILY - SPOILT JEWELS.