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- EASILY - SPOILT JEWELS.

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A NEW RUSSIAN SECT.

ANGLO-GERMAN RELATIONS.

THE ARMY ESTIMATES.

EDUCATION CONTROL.

THE NIGERIAN RISING.

IMPORTATION OF LIVE CATTLE.

HYPOCRITICAL BIGAMIST.'

EYE SPECIALIST'S PAMPHLETS.

ESCAPE FROM GIPSIES. E.

BABY DROWNED BY BABY,

MIDNIGHT rUNTING TRAGEDY.

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DEATH OF GENERAL GATACRE.

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DEATH OF GENERAL GATACRE. A BRAVE BUT UNLUCKY SOLDIER. The death is announced at Gambela, in too Upper Soudan, of Major-General Sir William Gat acre, at the age of .sixty-three. The first years of General Gatacre's service in the Army were uneventful, and he was forty years old before he attracted the notice of Lord' Roberts, who took the Colonel of the 2nd Middlesex with him to' Simla as Deputy- Quartermaster-General. In India, says a T ¡mes correspondent, his restless energy was almost proverbial, one of his walking feats in particular, a march of between forty and fifty miles among the hills, passing later into a local tradition. In the Chitral ex- pedition of 1895 his indomitable energy and per- sonal example were invaluable in overcoming obstacles, but he was thought to subject his brigade, just as he afterwards did the British division in the S0udan, to an unnecessary strain by continual surprise visits. lie distinguished himself by saving a man from drowning in tho Panjkora Rfvor. Two years later he was in the Soudan, and his personal courage was agin dis- played at the battle of the Atbara, where lie was the first man to get through the dervishes' zareba. With his men. therefore, he was very popular, even though lie made them sleep in their boots, and generally went on the principle of hardening them till they were fit for any- thing. In all their hardships he took a part. In the Boer War the force of circumstances and bad luck hardly gave him a chance. A large part of his command was reft from him to save the situation in Natal, and he. was left with a very inferior force to face the Boers in their strongholds. His attempted night sur- prise of the Boer position at Stonnberg (Decem- ber 9th and 10th), was a perfectly justifiable scheme, and only failed owing to a miscalcula- tion cf the distance and an error on the part of his guide. He simply fared as White fared in the first sortie from Ladysmith (October 30th), and retired with a loss of 616 men taken prisoners and two guns. His other casualties were twenty-four killed and sixty-seven wounded. Another stroke of bad luck befell him on April 3rd, next year, when the Reddersburg disaster took place, and as this misfortune caused Lord Roberts to deprive him of his command, both sides of the affair may be given. General De Wet writes in his book I have never been able to understand why the great force stationed at Reddcrsburg made no at- tempt to come to the aid of the unfortunate victims at Mostertshoek. Their conduct seems to me to have been even more blameworthy than the similar negligence which occurred at Sauna's Post. They were not more than five miles of! and could watch the whole engagement—and yet they never stirred a foot to come and help their comrades. And it was fortunate for us that it was so, for we should have stood no chance at all against a largo force." The actual facts were as follows: There was not a single British soldier at Reddersburg dur- ing the attack on the detachment, at Mostert- shoek. The nearest troops were at BethanTe, on the railway, sixteen miles from Mostertshoek. The force there on the evening of April 3rd con- sisted of three batteries of Royal Field Artillery and one company Derby Regiment. Early next morning the Cameron Highlanders arrived from Bloemfontein. and three companies of mounted infantry from Edenberg. Sir W. Gal-acre also arrived and started at 8 a.m. with 300 mounted infantry. 600 infantry (Camerons). and two bat- teries. This force reached some hilis one and a- half mile west of Reddersburg at 10.30 a.m.. and there learnt that Captain McWhinney's detach- ment had surrendered two hours previously at Mostertshoek. five miles east of Reddersburg. On his return home General Gatacre was given the command of the Eastern District, but even in peace his bad luck did not desert him. When riding to hounds he was thrown from his horse, broke his collar-bone, and received internal in- juries. from which. however, he recovered. He retired in March, 1904.

A STORY OF PARNELL.

BLACK AND WHITE IN AFRICA.

-= GRA YE CHARGE AGAINST A…

DEATH OF MR. F. J-. HORNIMAN.I

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THE KING IN TRANCE.

FIRE AT A BALL.

SHARING THE BOOTY.

EXPELLED UNDER THE ALIENS…

SWALLOWED A NAIL.

CHARGE AGAINST A SHIPOWNER.

A RAILWAY TRAGEDY.

INSANE MOTHER'S DEED.

"FOR LADIES ONLY."

HOSPITALS AND OUT-PATIENTS.

PARIS CANAL MYSTERY.

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FACTS AN& fancies.

AMERICAN HCMOUR. "

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- EASILY - SPOILT JEWELS.