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RUSSIANS DEFEATED.

ANOTHER RUSSIAN DISASTER.

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ANOTHER RUSSIAN DISASTER. OVER 800 CASUALTIES. The Daily "llail correspondent atXiuchwang sends particulars of another Russian defeat: On the afternoon of June 11th there was a sharp encounter between Russian and Japanese forces to the south- cast of the Siungyo range. The Japanese appeared in the morning in considerable force before the entrenched Russian position, made a feint, and then retreated. The ruse was successful, and 5,000 troops pursued the Japanese to the Yaotung Pass, ere the Japanese re-formed, and, assisted by rein- cements that had remained hidden, attacked the jursuingiorce, which, after a loss of 8CO killed and wounded, retreated in disorder. some of the defeated Russians arrived I l IUchwang with 235 transport carts. They deenp«i *ar.os <?f terrible fatigue, and exhibited the faces ion. Many had bad cuts on their In tho an l-nuni^er o1 their horses bore wounds, covpr *ievpi"no a strong detachment was sent to insnp ? Prfitreatof the remainder, who, alter being entrJ j b* General Kondratovitch at Tashihchao, j„ ln°" to-day *r01n that place for Liao-yang. The I'n-inese.' *f' is stated, marched to Siungtai from thp (Port Adams), their object being to clear 7in;~uuStr\ct preparatory to an advance on this neighbourhood. ADMIRAL SKRYDLOFF AT WORK. The special correspondent of the Standard at St. etersburg says that a telegram has been received "om Admiral Skrydloff, stating that on Tuesday last he moved with the Vladivostok: Squadrou owards Port Arthur, and arrived within thirty nllles of that place. There he ran into a fog, and und several Japanese torpedo-boats and two battle- ips confronting him. The Japanese attacked him rcely and inflicted some damage. The Russians returned the fire, but as none of the Port Arthur fimps appeared, as Admiral Skrydloff had hoped and Expected, they returned to Vladivostock,which they reached at eight o'clock on Friday morning. JAPANESE ADVANCE BEGUN. The general advance of the Japahese First Army ■under General Kuroki, which has been resting at Feng-whang-cheng since its victory at the Yalu, appears now to ha.ve begun, and General Kuropatkin is said to be falling back before it on Liao-yang. Sainiatse to the north-east and Siu-yen on the south-east of the position have been occupied, and the Japanese front extends about eighty miles. Siu-yen is of great strategic importance. It is about forty miles from Kaiping and forty-five miles trom Haicheng, and absolutely controls the roads to those places. Sainiatse controls the road :to Liao-yang ani Mukden. By this road the Mo-tien-ling Mountains, ^hich are strongly fortified, and which constitute ■fcn almost impregnable Russian stronghold, will 08 oided by the Japanese on their advance north. ———— RUSSIANS TRYING TO ESCAPE. The Japanese at Shanghai report that the Russians are steadily trying to escape from Port Arthur oversea, owing to the paucity of provisions. The Japanese Fleet is fully occupied on various duties round the Liaotung Peninsula, including the destruction of mines, but there have been no casualties since the affair of the Koshino. It is reported that 3.000 Russians, with twenty -«<uns, have evacuated Yin-kow. THE BATTLE OF NAN-SHAN. The Russian losses in the battle of Nan-shan have now been ascertained at least approximately. totl* Japanese War Office that ine gendarmes bunerl « men round Nan-shan, boMde?Utf"P a"Cl 66, near their camps. C.^„Stin?,^hcr8 in{med portions as between killed and T'i IT"" V AAld glve the total Kussian losses V 2,000 nnd 4,000, or about the same THE BELEAGUERED TOWN. An interesting account of the condition of Port -Arthur is supplied by the special correspondent of the Standard at Chifu. It is from the testimony of a Mechanic who has been engaged in the Govern- ment docks at the Russian pori. He says that the 0 cs» the workshops, and the town itself have practically sustained no damage from the repeated ombardTtcnts. All the Russian men-of-war have nished their repairs, with the exception of the visan, the Czarevitch, and another vessel, tha name of which my informant did not know. These three are lying in the inner basin. The docks are not as present able to accommodate them, but ar9 oeing enlarged. The work, however, would take six months to complete. Several torpedo-boats are aiso undergoing repair., in the docks. Besides a. considerable number of torpedo-boats, the Russians beeu deep, 6urm'ountedUby h"avl entr.eachm™ts 15ft. The outlying districtsarIy^wV £ ima"y P,1:lce*- the Chinese wpn> nnt f ">• 11 thickly mined. As £ y f. famihar with the making of entrenchments, the whole of the work has had to b» done by the Russians themselves. A large number of Chinese are still left in Port Arthur. The Russian officials issued orders, on Monday, that all who wished to leave were free to do so'during the following three days, but that afterwards no departures would be permitted. The Chinese workmen in the docks are receiving 50 per cent. extra pay, and are allowed three pounds of rice daily. For the first two months of the war the ration was free, nut latterly they have had to pay for it. Food supplies are stated to be plentiful, but the coal supply is running short. All the junks conveying the Chinese refugees were searched by the Japanese off Wan-ching-tao and the Miau-tao group, where the torpedo-boats Were cruising. They were supplied with provisions in all cases where the stores were insufficient, and were allowed to proceed. RUSSIAN GENERAL WOUNDED. A telegram from St. Petersburg says that the Czar received news that a battle began at noon on .1\1t¡e 14th round a Russian position six kilometres *° the south of the station of Wafanhoon ( ? Wa- tang-kau), the enemy making repeated vigorous attempts to dislodge the Russian left llank. The attack was repelled, and the Russians claim to •have retained their position. The 1st Regiment, occupying the left flank of the Position, sustained severe losses. Its commander, Colonel Khvastunoff, and the adjutant, Sub-Lieu- tenant DragosIafINadochinsky. were killed. General ^erngross, b who commands the 1st. East Siberian brigade, was wounded, a shrapnel bullet shattering the right side of his lower jaw, but he remained on the Held. Talienwan Bay is not yet entirely clear of mines, and the work of removing them is proceeding tinder Admiral Katoara, who has a special fleet ot IIInall vessels for the purpose. Sixteen mines wera T>loded on the 9th and 10th without Three fast gw'ii'Oais have s<-nt. to t lie Scii|( ,s\vi--lJo's':• coast. t.i «?<»;> J:s i: Mi I'am 'rawlcis lulling v ilhin the iSwe-ir.iiv limit. 1;um fchure. At the T!runes 1 <• i.-e-eoiir* La/. irv.s (> vent it/, niiiicral v.an r us-ij*.i;t r-r, of 1^0, <rcial- ^ca* was lined £ 7 a;l «•< sts for .••< liing aeratrd ^~ters to which a f.;isc trii.de detciiption had li;eu affixed.

j GHASTLY TRAGEDY IN SPAIN,…

L MURDERER TRACED BY A DOG.

A SISTER'S SACRIFICE.

~ TINPLATE DISPUTE SETTLED.

RAID ON SUNDAY GAMBLERS.

ROYAL BRITISH BANK CASE.

DECAPITATED AND BURNT.

ENTERED UP WAGES FALSELY.

ITAMPERING WITH SIGNALS.

"RIPPER". CRIMES IN BERLIN.

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MAJOR SEELY A LIBERAL.I

CLERGYMAN FINED FOR ASSAULT.

OPERATION ON THE AMEER.

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