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."MELIDENr

THE QUEEN'S PALACE.

OPENING OF THE NEW ENGLISH…

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BANK HOLIDAY AT RHYL.

A GWESPYR MAN AND HIS MOTHER.

GWAENY SGOR.

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J PRESTATYX." -

DENBIGHSHIRE AZD FLINTSHIRE…

[No title]

---..-.. TOWN AND COUNTRY…

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even a pendulum does not swing of its own accord. It is the anger with which the country regards the Education Bill that has set the pendulum in motion, just as it was the Bread Tax which produced a similar result at Bury. This Government tricked iuself into power in October, 1900, by posing as an indispensible national institu- tion engaged in a great national undertaking. It has proved itself to be nothing more than the creature of a sect, inspired by the narrowest denominational ideals. The natural reaction has followed It is im- possib'e that any but the slaunchest of partisans should support a Government which has committed itself to a sectarian crusade. With the examples of Bury and North Leeds before him, Mr. Balfour can be under no illusions. Whatever majorities the Whips may be able to give him in the House, whatever temporary triumphs" the closure may secure, he is legislating against the will of the country. Democracy be- comes a sham when statesmen can ignore a lesson so plain. One would have thought that the Leeds election would have suggested to Mr. Balfoui the wisdom of some compromise on the Education question. He may, if he pleases, perserve. but at the present rate he is saving the way for a reaction which will probably endanger the interests he has at heart much more seriously than any politic yielding on his part might do at the present moment. An Education Bill which was not grossly unfair might survive a general election. A settlement on Mr. Balfour's Dresent lines can be only temporary. But the fair moment for compromise has now passed. It arrived with an amendment proposed by Mr. Dillon. As the Irish members have supported the Government in this Bill there would have been no humiliation involved in a surrender to an ally. The Irish proposal, moreover, was eminently leasonable. It was that in the :3,000 paiishes where the Church School is the only school, the board of management should consist of two members elected by the trustees, two by the Parish Council, and two by the parents of the children actually attending the school. Mr. Balfour, however, stuck to his point that four members should be appointed by the Church and only two by the iocality. He would, he said,'consent to nothing which might destroy the denominational char- acter" of these schools. It is useful to have this simple statement of principle. It would be fair enough but for one circum- stance-that Mr. Balfour's own Biil has already destroyed the denominational character of these schools by providing for their maintenance out of the rates. From the moment that the Church ceases to be responsible for the cost of the education given in these schools, ceases even to find .the teachers' salaries, it has no further right to treat them as denominational pre- serves. Moreover, Mr. Balfour seems to assume that the four managers to be chosen by the parish in Mr. Dillon's scheme would all be Nonconformists. Many of them, perhaps most of them, would be Church- men—but not bigots. That is why the extreme Anglican party object to public control.