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-""""-----------FAREWELL TO…

A NIGHT OF HORRORS.

SEASON FOR WAITING.

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HORRIBLE DISCOVERY.

A SNAKE IN IA COWS EAR.

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A MW YEAR'S ERROR.

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LITER All Y EXTRACTS. .I

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LITER All Y EXTRACTS. I To him who knowingly does me wrong will ] return the protection of my ungrudging love; the more evil comes from him, the more good shall go from me. Hatred does not cease by hatred at any time, hatred ceases only by love. How TO BE HAPPY.—There are two ways of being happy--N-ve may may either diminish our wants or augment onr means. Either will do—the result is the same and it is for each man to decide for himself, and do that which happens to be the easiest. If you are idle, or sick, or poor, however hard it may be to diminish your wants, it will be harder to augment your means. If you are active and prosperous, or young, or in good health, it may be easier for you to augment your means than to diminish your wants. But if you are wise you will do both at the same time—young or old, rich or poor, sick or well and, if you are very wise, you will do both in such a way as to augment the general happines of society.—FRANKLIN. AN OBNOXIOUS LABEL.—English merchants are having a hard time in Constantinople, owing to the campaign caaried on by the Turkish cen- sor against trademarks and advertisements entering the country. A firm had the advertisement and directions that accom- padied their goods-a special brand of soap— translated into Arabic. The translation was done in London, and in the phrase which in English read "Soapniikers to her Majesty the Queen" appeared a title which in Turkey is only applied to the Sultan. The censor offered the importer the alternative of returning the soap to England or removing the obnoxious label. In the meantime, British merchants are warned against sending any goods to Turkey bearing trademarks, or circulars which could by any stretch of the imagination be in any way connected with Islamism or the Sultan. NOT EASILY OPENED.—"I bought this um- brella in Germany," said the lawyer, and no- body can open it except myself. Do you notice that little keyhole in the slide ? Hre's the key on the other end of my watch-chain, and until it is inserted and turned the thing is absolutely immovable. Anybody else would and it harder to raise than a Kansas mortgage. On at least a dozen different occasions the umbrella has been stolen, or taken by accident, if you prefer the term, but it always found its way home. You see, my name is cut on the handle, and the umbrella itself is well known to all the attaches of the building. When they see a stranger struggling with it in the doorway on a rainy day they promptly confiscate the property and bring it back. It is such a good scheme I'm sur- prised the idea hasn't been generally adopted in this country.Aiiiericait, Paptr. EMERALDS IN RUSSIA.-Emeralds, some of which are very fine, are found in the district of Ekaterinburg, along the banks of the Tokova River, about fifty-two miles from the capital of the district. Mining for this precious stone be- gan in 1841, and at the beginning gave very good results. The first emerald was found by a peasant named Maxim Kojevnikow, in 1839, while he was examining the roots of a tree which had been uprooted by a storm. It is pretty cer- tain, however, that discoveries of the. same kind had already been made in 1669. It is even possible that finds had been made prior to them, as the Czar Boris Godounow presented the Venetian engraver, Francis Ascenti, with a sable fur and one hundred ducats for having cut a large emerald for a ring. The finest emeralds were found when these stones were being mined for the account of the Government. During this period, that is, up to 1862, fifty-six thousand pounds were extracted. The Gov- j ernment afterward framed out the mines to I private parties, who were not successful. The emeralds of superior quality have been found near the surface of the soil, while those found in deep ground were of inferior quality. GIVES OFF LIGHT.-In a recent lecture before the Royal Society Lord Kelvin vindicated, the correctness of Volta's early theories in relation to contact electricity. He showed that when a zinc plate and copper plate are brought into contact with each other and then separated, one was charged with positive electricity and the other with negative. He further demonstrated that this was not due to oxidation by air or the moisture of the atmosphere, as it stated in the text- books of the dav. Lord Kelvin exhibited other experiments illustrating electrification produced by means of dissimilar metals, and showed some furious properties possessed by uranium. If a plate of this metal was connected with an electrometer and touched by a plate of aluminium positive electrification was produced, gradually changing past zero to negative. He also demonstrated that the rays given off by uranium in a dark room are a constant property of the substance and not a slow radiation of previously absorbed light, as has been claimed, but he could offer no solution of the mysterious action of this metal. BREAKFAST WITH MACAULAY.—Once I had the honour, when I was still very young, of going +- Kro,.irfowf with him in the Albanv. and verv much I enjoyed wandering about the room and hearing his remarks on some old ballads and a collection of newspaper cuttings which he had looked out for our a musement. I cannot now recollect what these cuttings were, but I have an idea that they were critiques on his writings, and that he laughed very merrily over them as he proved them to be as valueless as reviews too often are. After breakfast a huge old fashioned green chariot came to the door, and Miss E. and I drove with him to the Houses of Parliament, where he made himself our showman. I re- member very distinctly that as we passed White- hall he bent forward in the carriage, leaning on his umbrella, and said to me, Outside that window"—indicating the window from which Charles I. was led to the scaffold—" a nice little piece of business was done two hundred years ago and he followed up the remark by one of his animated discussions on the character and history cf the king.-From "People I have Known," in the Cornhill Magazine. THE CHAINS OF HABIT.—Down from the dark ages comes the story-if memory is true to its charge—of an expert blacksmith, who was such a master of his trade, and withal so proud of his skill, that he often boasted no man could break a chain made by him. In time the blacksmith himself was imprisoned and manacled. With the hope that he might made his escape, he examined the chain to see if it was possible to break it, when, to his horror, he discovered that the chain was one made by his own hands, which no living man could break, himself included. The chain forged by his own hands made the blacksmith a helpless, hopeless prisoner in that vile dungeon. Is it not the same with us ? Each of us are forging a chain we cannot break. Every bad habit be- comes a link in the chain, which will bind, in hopeless slavery, the soul that makes it. Acts form habits. Let your acts be beautiful and Christ-like, and your habits will be likewise.- PAUL S. BIGGS SHIPLEY. THE PICTURESQUENESS OF SPANISH LIFE.— Yes, the real charm of Spain is the picturesque- ( ness of its life. Even commerce here is picturesque. Would that my greengrocer at home kept shop under a, deep archway festooned with hanging clusters of crimson pimientos and pale young onions! A graceful water-jar beside him, of a chestnut colour, and maybe not far off him another jar suggestive of old Majolica. Or that she stood among the kerchiefed market-woinen, behind that im- mensely long narrow board in the plaza, which is as it, were a repeating scale of colour, a scale of softest browns and greys—I know not what nuts and curious dried fruits and herbs -periodically broken into, dominated by the vivid tones of orange and lemon. You smile superior. A cauliflower off an ordinary shop counter must, of course, eat better than one out of so miserably picturesque a place! Not at all. Spanish vegetables are excellent. The garbanzo, or chick-pea, is one which we should blush to be without.—From "Pastels from Spain," in the Carnhill Magazine. 1

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TIT - B I T S,

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