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TRIPLE BOB MAJOR:

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WRECKED IN A SNOWSTORM.

GIGANTIC COAL FI RE.

TORQUAY'S LATEST VENTURE.

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REMARKABLE CHRISTMAS DAYS.…

PAID FOR.

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THE COLONEL'S FEELINGS.

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EPITOME OF NEWS. 0.

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YOUNG FOI.I{S' COLUMN. .-

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YOUNG FOI.I{S' COLUMN. ON GUARD. Yon have a little prisoner, He's nimble, sharp and ciever, He's sure to get away from you, Uiiless you Nyatcli iliva ever, And when he once gets out he makes More trouble in all hour Than you can stop in many a day, Working with all your power. He sets your playmates by the ears, lie says what isn't so, And uses many ugly words Not good for you to know. Quick, fasten tight the ivory gates, And chain him while he's young! For this same dangerous prisoner Is jubt—your little tongue. ANIMAL STORIES. I HEJtO. Hero is the name of a dog owned by a little girl I know, lie is her faithful companion, and accompanies her in all her walks. On her birth- day her father gave her a canary, but Hero did not seem well pleased at that, and for a few days sulked, and wotil(I not play with his little mistress. After a time, finding he came in for his usual share of attention, he became as lovable as lie nscd to be. One day whilst cleaning the canary's cage it new away, and Nellie was in great trouble suout; L Hero seemed to observe tlii. -iiid he too disappeared. Presently Nellie saw him under a tree in the garden with some- thing in his mouth, which ho brought carefully to his mistress. It turned out to be the lost canarv. and it had hurt its wing and so fallen by the tree where clever Hero found it. A KIND PONY. A gentleman owned a very fine pony which was very fond of him, and would come from the paddock at the sound of his voice, and follow him about like a dog. One day the pony became lame, and was kept in the stable. About this time a cat had a family of kittens on a ledge just above the pony's manger. She and the pony became great friends. One morning, while jumping up to her kittens, she rolled oif the lodge into the manger, injuring her foot so that she could scarcely crawl along to obtain her food at the house. lylien she came back she was unable to get up to her kit!ens, so she Jay donn at the pony's feet and mewed, and looked up piteously several times. At last the poriv, scorning to understand what she wanted, reached down, took the cat gently in teeth, and lifted her up to the ledge to iv- t kittens. This was repeated morning after ■vornins. The cat would roll off into the go and get her breakfast, come back4 and be lifted up to her family. "YES." sni,1 little Amy's aunt, "you shall come to the country and see me milk the cows." What's that, auuLie ? '• Why, that's how we get milk for our coffee i'or breakfast." .( Oh, said Amy l.lw,yi¡¡gly, we do it with a tin-opener!" Cm-EL IJSS NEWELL. Miss Sernphina Martha Newell A I Was thought by some to be quite cruel. And shall I tell you why ? On Saturdays she used to bake rhe pastry cakes, the tasty cake: And pastry known as pie. To watch her was a fearsome sight! She beat the eggs, both you; ai,.d white; She ichipprd the cream with all her might, And stoned the raisins with delight! That's why Miss Seraphina Newell Was thought by some to be quite cruel. SLEEPY GEORGE. George Brown was one of the brightest of blue-eyed curly-haired little boys. He lived in (he country and went to the village school. Of al the ¡,tLHlies he liked arithmet.ie the best, and ccutdrecite rule after rule with ease. One evening George went to the old school- room to a religious meeting with his two elder sisters. The rooiii was nearly full when they entered, and they were obliged to sit directly in front of the platfonn. Ruth and Eelen did not like to sit there for George was often very restless, which troubled his sisters very much; but for half an hour the little boy was so quiet, that his sisters quite forgot him. Then Ruth discovered that he was sound asleep. Her first thought was What if he should snore?'' for he sometimes did. So she made up her mind to quietly awaken him. By this time Helen found out that her brother was asleep, and so it happened, that as the minister finished speaking, in the hush that followed there was a ttig at both arms of the sleeping boy. Instead of quietly opening his eyes, George started, sat upright and called out in a clear voice, just as if he were reciting at school. Invert the divisor, and proceed as in multipli- cation." Of course, everyone laughed, and as for George, the sound of his own voice awoke him thoroughly. InATE Father: "I wonder what makes my razor so dull i Little Cyril: "Dull, papa? Why, it was beautiful and sharp when 1 made my boat with it yesterday." JOCKO. i When Jocko came from the tropics we were all as pleased as could be Uncle lial's a sailor, you know so he went into a forest and caught him, and brought him home as a present for me; But he (Jocko, not Uncle, of course) was very cold and siiivern, and tender, And though I put my own little chair by the fire- side for him, he would go and sit on the fender. So Nurse made him a nicr. warm coat, bright red, with a collar of blue; And soon lie was quite at home in the nursery, and wanted to copy eveiytlimg that lie saw us do, So 1 let him put Dolly to bed, and he tucked her up warm and t ight. '• A'sponsible nurse is such a coimort," Mamma savs; and 1 left h'un alone, feeling suie hs would watch her all right. I But I hadn't been gone live minutes before I heard a terrible din It was Jocko, sitting on tho library floor, play- j¡)<T Papa's most precious violin And my darling child was neglected, and the violin was spoiled, and the "grown-ups" were ever so vexed. It's not a bit of use depending on monkeys.for were ever so vexed. It's not a bit of use depending on monkeys, for you never can tel] what they'll do next!

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