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TRIPLE BOB MAJOR:

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WRECKED IN A SNOWSTORM.

GIGANTIC COAL FI RE.

TORQUAY'S LATEST VENTURE.

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REMARKABLE CHRISTMAS DAYS.…

PAID FOR.

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THE COLONEL'S FEELINGS.

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THE COLONEL'S FEELINGS. It was about a week before Christmas whor Colonel Smith was wandering homewarc upon the main thoroughfare of the city O) his adoption. The colonel was as full of thf spirit of the merry season as was the very air itself. He thought of the presents he was about to make and of those which he ex- pected to receive as he cast his eyes about him and saw the shop windows full of the latest novelties in toys. When he was lost in such a pleasant Christmas reverie as he hadn't had since he was a small boy, lie happened to pass along in front of a great marble hotel. At the time he was passing a painter was engaged in the act of retoning some of the inside blinds at an open window. It is not likely that it will ever be known just how it hap- pened, but the painter, while probably pre- occupied with dreams of the approaching holiday, toppled the pot of paint off the win- dow sill, from which point it whirled through the chilly ashen air and deposited about three-quarters of its contents upon the colonel. The latter was as red with rage as he was with paint when he new into and through z, the main entrance of that hotel and pre- sented himself at the office. "Sir!" exclaimed the colonel in a tower- ing rage. "What kind of treatment do you call this, sir?" "Pretty rough," replied the clerk, not knowing exactly what to say, because lie was ignorant of the accident that had just happened. "I am glad," roared the colonel, with beautiful irony, that you are at least kind enough to assume an attitude of sympathy, 'but I am here, sir, to demand satisfaction for damages. As I was passing, sir, one of your painters, sir, upset a pot of red paint upon me, sir 1 Here the colonel paused for breath, and the clerk, learning the cause of his trouble, became very profuse in his apologies. I am sorry it happened, sir, very sorry. But you should not be so unreasonable as to PRETTY ROUGH TREATMEXT. blame the establishment for what was the fault of a painter employed by it." You should employ only painters who understand their business, sir!" roared the colonel in a fine frenzy, and I will teach you that paint cannot be poured upon me with impunity, sir "We are said the clerk, "to do what is right in the matter. We will pay for having your clothing cleaned, or we will buy you a new suit if necessary." You cannot get out of it on any such basis as that, sir. I am going to make an example of you, sir, and inside of 24 hours, too sir! And having made this threat the colonel bustled out of the building and up the street. Upon the following day the colonel sent his legal representative to talk the matter over and see if it could not be adjusted to his satisfaction without the worry and ex- pense of a legal contest. It happened tliat the hotel's attorney was Ipresent when the colonel's legal friend ar- rived, and the former said We are perfectly willing to do the fair thing by Colonel Smith. We admit that the colonel's clothing was ruined through the negligence of one of our employees, and we are willing to pay for it. We will give him a sufficient sum to purchase himself a new suit of clothes. How does £ 5 strike you ?" "Such a proposition would not strike the colonel at all," replied the friend of the ex-warrior. It is not the amount of money involved in this thing that is making him miserable." "Then what is it?" asked the hotel's at- torn ev. "It's his feelings." replied the other lawyer, "his feelings. You know lie be- longs to one of the oldest and proudest of our aristocratic families, and he is as haughty and hypersensitive as any other OX CHRISTMAS MORNING. bearer of his name. His feelings have been deeply wounded, and tiiey can never be healed by the price of a suit. 01 clothes." -'It is pretty hard to ask us to pay for his feelings," said the hotel's attorney, with a smile, because I do not see how we can ap- praise them in order to reach an intelligent idea of their monetary value." "And then," broke in the other lawyer, "he is living with 3, maiden aunt who is also a very dignified and proud spirited person. And when she saw the colonel enter the house bedaubed with red paint and heard that he had been gibed at by boys as lie passed along the street she was com- pletely undone and has since been confined to her bed. Her feelings have got to be paid for too. The colonel is really more dis- tressed over his aunt's feelings than any- thing else connected with this unfortunate air.iir, pnd lie proposes to fight it out on the basis of their feedings and wounded pride." "See here," said the hotel's attorney. I'll tell you what we'll do. We'll settle the thing for £7 10s. and not a cent more. If this doesn't meet your views of a fair com- promise, you must seek your remedy in the law, and then yois-will find what your client's feelings are worth." Is that the best vou will do?" It is," replied the hotel's attorney. On Christmas morning, when the bells were ringing merrily in the frosty air, Colonel Smith appeared in a new suit of clothes to celebrate the occasion, for he has accepted the hotel s terms of £ .( 10s. P-7 for his ruined clothing and 10/- for his feel- ings and those of his dear old aunty.

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