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Family Notices

I" I GOOD WICK.

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I" I GOOD WICK. ¡ from the Jettv.We understand t objections have been lodged with the W.R. Company to bathing from the boat ."ttv at Goodwick. Since the warm weather set in the number of bathers have grown to "enormous proportions. Most, if not all, are of the sterner sex and who naturally take advantage of the splendid convenience the concrete steps and parapet afford for enjoy- ing full benefits of open bathing. But to the objection raised. A year ago the popu- lation was less than half its present number, bathers of the regular daily kind totalled per- haps a baker's dozen. No one ever heard of anyone taking a header from the concrete steps unless suitably attired. Things have changed somewhat since then. The only house then commanding a close and clear view of the jetty was the Penrhyn, which was for some months vacant. This year it is fully occupied by Air W L Gray (station and quay superintendant) and Mrs Gray and family. Higher up, almost in a line with Penrhyn, is a spacious semi-detached villa, whose upper rooms are in the possession of the manageress (Miss Morgan) and staff of assistants at the Harbour Refreshment Rooms. In addition hotel guests are to find accom- modation at the fine villa should the Bay Hotel become over-crowded. Possibly not one of those referred to would raise any I serious objection to bathers making use of I the jetty at proper times only that many of them actually undress and dive into the water with absolutely nodingson." Having heard that complaints have reached the head office of the G.W.R. Company regular I habitues, who always don full length bath- ing suits, are anxious that, rather than risk the prohibition of bathing from the jetty urge that bathers shall wear proper costume and disrobe close to the wall of the slip-wav. Some may argue that the public have a right of way to the jetty. True, but that very fact in itself involves the stricture that users shall not do anything which may become a nuisance in the eyes of the public. The latter includes persons of both sexes and bathers, in the nude, necessarily exclude the gentler half making use of the jetty as a promenade whenever bathing is going on. Of course, no one would object to bathing, decently indulged in, during early morning when few of the fairer half are about. It is, therefore, to be hoped that bathers will do nothing likely to cause the authorities to deprive those making legitimate, that is, decent, use of the jetty for the healthful dip in the briny.—Everyone will admit that for youths in their teens proper bathing apparel is indispensable under present conditions. A few years' ago scarcely a building overlooked the jetty. Now, however, houses are inhabit- ed that command a clear and uninterrupted view. Last year, it is true, a mixed company of coal diggers, their wives and sweathearts, were observed gamboling —bobbing up and down—in rather i £ scanty rig in the rippling waves on the beach, but they were visitors for the day. Yet, that could not be tolerated to any extent at the present time, and proper regulations would have to be enforced were the practice to become more frequent. Some Fair Opinions.—One who guards somewhat zealously the boon of bathing from the jetty took the trouble to ascertain the opinions of several fair" whose boudoir windows gaze directly on the animated scene referred to above. One said, smiling, I should not dream of inviting any but my closest lady friends to my sitting-room whilst bathing as carried on now is indulged in from the jetty.—"No, we don't make use of binoculars. t Far from being entertaining it is most objectionable." Yes, there are al- ways some of the assistants in the rooms." Another said, We would not object to them bathing if all wore bathing costumes."— Another gave the reason for protesting, Be- cause I cannot admire the view on the Fish- guard side. The lovely scenery, of course." I'm not offended in the least" remarked another, but they ought to wear proper costumes and not dance about the parapet in the way they do now."—Generally, it will be noted, that the objections are in no sense captious or unreasonable. There is not the least intention to deprive bathers of their health-giving recreation, and everyone with the slightest pretention to modesty will readily acquiese and see to it that they are in future clothed, in a becoming garment during the time they are indulging in one of the most invigorating exercises the summer season and the sea afford.—It might be here suggested that if an awning were fixed by the wall near the railway embankment, a capital dessing-room" would then be im- provised at small cost.—Anything rather than total prohibtion. Killaloe Trips.—Advantage is being taken of the excellent and cheap Killaloe trips arranged by the G.W.R. Company. Any person desirious of enjoying seven days tour- ing in Ireland may do so at the modest sum of This includes lailway, steamboat and coach fares, hotel expenses and guide. There were numerous bookings last week by this inexpensive route. The much advertised tours on the Continent are. not more economi- cal whilst the scenery by the route is un- equalled anywhere. Dog and Troosair."—Last week a cyclist had a rather alarming experience. Seeing a fellow cyclist a head going in the same di- rection he hailed him to stop. The first cyclist accordingly slackened space, but un- fortunately the second misjudged the pace and the distance and cannon'd into the other. Result, among other minor details, a badly ripped troosair belonging to the second cyclist, a Fishguardian, by the way. So out- rageously torn was the troosair that the first wheelman had to return home and search his wardrobe for a pair to lend his companion. The garment was donned and the damaged pantaloons discarded. But the first cyclist had a dog and, as might natur- ally have been expected, the faithful tyke, after sniffing at the troosair, declined to follow his owner, but accompanied the cycl- ist with the borrowed bags all the way to Fishguard. Nor would the dog leave the wearer of its master's tweed under any condi- tions. Finding sauce and suasion alike use- less lie allowed the animal to accompany him home. An hour later the dog might have been seen trotting down Windy Hall hill with the "bags" his master lent the hap- less cyclist.—Fact Harbour Pars.—Several notabilities crossed and re-crossed the Channel last week by the turbines. The largest passenger list at a single ordinary crossing was close upon 200. Early in the Spring the turbine, St Andrew,' will join the fleet of luxurious steamers.— From the 1,100 feet mark shore wards, a con- crete wall of some 14 feet in thickness is be- ing constructed on the weather side of the breakwater to neutralise the effects of possible bad weather during the winter. On every hand, it is admitted, that last winter's storms were the most severe of any experienced for many years past.—On Friday afternoon last the chief chef on the Fishguard express ven- tured to bathe in the sea opposite the quay. Whilst enjoying the luxury his costume slipped down to his feet which were entang- led in such a manner that he was unable to extricate them. Realising the danger he hailed a boat occupied by one of ( Morgan Owen's sons and the timely arrival of the craft averted what seemed likely to become a tragedy. The chef is an apt swimmer, but the awkward predicament caused him to get excited and well-nigh lose his presence of mind. However, when the help arrived he managed to free himself and get into the boat. Young master Owen deserves com- mendation for his timely act. OPENING NEW CHAPEL. — Inauguration services in connection with the new English Congregational Chapel were held on Sunday last, attended by numerous congregations. The new building marks, to a certain extent, not only the growth of the place, but also the progress of the cause of Congiegationalism. The demand for English services has, through the faithful devotional energy of several of the leading spirits, been met most amply. It is just on four years ago that a meeting was called at Goodwick to consider ways and means of establishing a local church. Those attending were Revs Lewis James, Bryn-y- bank, Cardigan, Gwylim Jones, Penarth, J G James, Rhosycaerau, and W Morlars Davies, Tabernacle, Fishguard. Also Messrs WG James, J.P., Pantyphilip, W S Jenkins, J.P., Francis Davies, Paris House Gazmne James, Fishguard; T Perkins, Ilendrewcn, and Daniel Bevan, Goodwick. After due delibera- tion a committee was appointed to secure a site. Negotiations were, however, suspended until June, 1905, when, at the request of the South Wales Congregational Union the Rev Llovd Williams, of Tenby, visited Goodwick, and the result was that the Reading Room, belonging to the G.W.R. Co. was secured at an annual rental of £20. On July iotli of that year the initial services were conducted by the Revs Lewis James, and the Rev Griffiths, missioner to the S. W. C. U. The last named minister remained in charge of the cause for six months, his devotion and able preaching attracting large congregations. So Z, 17) quickly have the members increased that the accommodation became inadequate at the Reading Room. The Church was officially constituted in December, 1905, and on its behalf Mr W G James, J.P., Pantyphillip, attended the Annual Meeting of the Congre- 17 gational Union at Bridgend. The question of securing a site and erecting a chapel at Goodwick was further discussed. Mr James was requested by the Union to negotiate for a site and proceed with the building. A site was eventually decided upon on the side of the hill, and considerable difficulties had to be overcome in removing the rock. The Chapel, which is now completed, is a hand- some and commodious corrugated iron structure, and was erected by Messrs Harlow, of London. Throughout the negotiations and the erection of the chapel Mr W G James \vas given a free hand by the Congregational Union and the Goodwick Church, and the present structure reflects great credit upon his management.—On Sunday, at 10.30 the place was well filled and in the evening there was quite a full church. Pointed sermons and excellent singing characterised the meetings. Miss Ruby Davies presided at the organ with her usual skill and taste, and altogether the day was most inspiring. Officiating were the Revs J Williams, Saundersfoot, and the Rev Lloyd Williams, of Tenby. On Sunday next, when the opening services will be again continued, the Rev James Lewis, Brynbank, will officiate. Carnival Public Meeting.—In response to the notice in the Echo convening a public meeting, at the Reading-room, to consider the advisability of holding a water carnival and longshore sports on August 6th next, there was a numerous attendance respresent- ing the trading community and general public. Again there was a thoroughly un- animous and business-like air about the whole of the proceedings. At once Mr A Williams (chief clerk of Marine department) was elected chairman on the proposition of Mr W J Canning, seconded by Mr Bewett.— Prefacing his opening remarks by thanking them for the honour Mr Williams proceeded to explain that in accord with the announce- ment, in the popular local newspaper the County Echo," they had called a public meeting to determine whether or not an institution, which marked the history of most progressive seaside places, should be estab- lished at Goodwick. They would observe that a committee had framed suggestions for the programme of a water carnival and it was for that meeting to decide. If it were in ) the affirmative then they would select a working committee and push the matter for- ward with all speed. There was no intention* to clash with the regatta on the Fishguard side, but he might venture to state that Fishguard would receive the support of Goodwick as hitherto. The date was decided upon subject to Mr G Lmbert Gibson's approval and he was happy to announce that Mr A H Clarke had received a telegram from that gentleman and which he would read. "To Clarke, Engineer's Office, Goodwick. Will close Works on Tuesday following Bank Holiday.—Gibson. (Applause).—So far as the employees on the Harbour were concern- ed the date was, as they would see, settled. The first question for the meeting to decide was, should the aquatic sports and carnival be held ? He would remind them that at Goodwick, just as they had at Neyland, they would have to do everything themselves. It was their aim to make the event enjoyable to all at the very least possible expense. They would have to bear in mind also that they were prepared to support Fishguard.— Mr D J Evans, The Stores, proposed that the aquatic sports and carnival be held.—Mr J R Davies, in seconding, said he looked forward to future developments at Goodwick through the G.W.R. Company and it was their duty to assist the Company in popularising the place which was so much advertised all over t the world. (Applause).On being put to the meeting the motion was carried unanim- ously, not one refraining from voting.—Mr D J Evans asked if it were proposed to have the half-day for the sports and the Chairman replied that it was intended to start about I p.m.—Mr J Howard Davies, solicitor, thought the day and tide most suitable for event.— At this point the Chairman aroused the risi- ble by an apt humorous quotation in Welsh. —Mr Moses agreed that the day was most appropriate.—Inspector Thomas suggested that the tradespeople should be consulted.— Mr D J Evans responded thai the day would suit the majority, himself included,admirably The Chairman suggested that a water event could scarcely be more suitable for the day after Bank Holiday (laughter).—Mr A W Stevens proposed the 6th of August be the appointed date.—Mr John Miles seconded.— This was put to the meeting and carried nem con.—The Chairman intimated that in regard to the secretary he regretted that Mr \V J Canning was una Ie to assume that position owing to holiday leave which ex- tended over the event. Mr Canning was popular with everybody and that was a very essential qualification in a secretary. He would again ask Mr Canning if he could undertake the duties. Mr Canning thanked them for the honour. It would have given him unfeigned pleasure to undertake the office had it not been that he was obliged to take his annual holiday at that period. He would, however, be pleased to do all he possibly could to assist any other secretary they might appoint (hear hear).—The Chair- man then said he never liked to make a diffi- culty without trying to tide over it. He had a nominee to put forward but he should like to have a local man proposed first.—-Mr J R Davies agreeing with the Chairman proposed that Mr Arthur Rowlands, who had shewn, by his connection with the recent eisteddfod, sound business tact, be the joint secretary. This was at once seconded and carried with- out a desentient.—The Chairman then pro- posed Mr Netherfiekl as the other joint secret- ary.—Mr J Howard Davies seconded and this was also carried unanimously.—Mr Nether- field, who is in the Marine Department and in every respect a very suitable official, returned thanks for the honour in selecting him and he would db his very best for tic success of the carnival. (Applause). Mr Rowlands was not present but it was given out that he would accept the position.—The Chairman said they wanted a comprehensive committee. They were prepared to accept the richman's £50 note as well as the widow's mite.—It was then decided that the committee I be selected and the following were unanim- ously chosen in the usual form by those pre- sent :—Messrs A H Clarke, Dunston (Neath) A .Williams (chairman) D J Evans, D James, W Davies, J R Davies, Ed Morgan, Stewart, L Nichols, Raymond Carpmael, J Miles (Booking Officer, Harbour Station), H Dellar, Moses, J Thomas (coxwain) J H Davies, Capt W Lewis, W Thomas, A W Stevens, D Williams, Blewett, J C Bowen, J Llewellyn (chemist) E Anthony (Henner) and Thomas (Traffic Department). Finally it was decid- ed that twenty-five should constitute the I executive committee.—On the proposition of Mr J R Davies, seconded by Mr H Dellar, Mr A B Edwards, (Engineer's Office) was unanimously elected treasurer. A proposi- tion to impose a qualifying fee of 2S 6d upon members of the committee was negatived al- most unanimously. It was pointed out by several that such a stipulation was opposed to progress especially in the case of a com- mitteee as that selected, all of whom were active workers.—The Chairman said they had reason to feel congratulated upon the large and representative gathering that evening (Applause). He thanked them and gave assurance of his hearty support to bring about the desired end. (Applause).—Mr Miles (Har- bour) proposed a vote of thanks which was seconded by Mr Dellar, and carried with acclamation.—The Chairman said if they were satisfied he was gratified.— I he work of electing president and vice-presidents was proceeded with in committee the delibera- tion lasting till 11 p.m. Mr G Lambert Gibson was elected president for the ensuing year. DROWNED. — On Saturday afternoon the body of Arthur GouifJ, aged 16, son of Mr Gould, of the Great Western Railway depot at Pershore, was recovered from the River Avon. The lad went to bathe, and it is supposed he was seized with a fit, to which he was subject. CRICKET-Goodwick v Wiltshire Regi- ment.—This match was played at Goodwick on Wednesday, the lyth inst, and resulted in a draw in favour of the regiment who made 2S7 for seven wickets.—Goodwick lost six wickets for 56 runs, when at 5 o'clock, by previous arrangements stumps had to be drawn. The Wiltshire regiment, who were represented by eleven of their officers, were very lucky in winning the toss, and gave a very line display of batting which was much appreciated.—The Goodwick Club certainly now' have the material of a very strong team, and should give a good account of itself. t It is hoped that a return match may be arran- ged with the Wiltshire Regiment so deservedly popu.ar at Goodwick. BUILDING SOCIETY.-A meeting of those interested in the formation of a Building Society at Goodwick was held at the Glen- dower Hotel on Saturday last. Those present were Messrs V J G Johns, J C Bowen, Isaiah Reynolds, Levi Rees, Daniel Francis, Evan Davies, \V L Williams, E T John, J F Remnant, M.P., W Goulding, H J P Thomas, Capt W Lewis and others.—Mr J C Bowen presided.—Mr Hugh J P Thomas explained the objects of the meeting, and Mr E T John proposed that a Club be formed, and this was seconded by Mr Levi Rees and carried. Mr V J G Johns moved that Mr Jas Evans be appointed secretary, this being seconded by ¡ Mr E T John. On the proposition of Mr Remnant, seconded by Mr Hugh Thomas, Mr J C Bowen was appointed chairman.—It was agreed that A Bank be treasurer of the Club and that a building committee be entrusted to make a selection.—Mr Levi Rees proposed that Mr Vincent Johns be appointed solicitor and Mr E T John seconded.—Mr Remnant proposed that Mr Hugh Thomas be appointed architect, and Mr Levi Rees seconded.—Messrs L Rees, Thos Lewis (chemist), Fishguard, Isaiah Reynolds (Haverfordwest) I) J Evans and Capt. W Lewis were appointed a building committee. On the proposition of Mr Phillips seconded by Mr Remnant it was decided that the Building Committee be left to draft rules for approval and be submitted at the next general meeting.—It was agreed that the Building Committee should meet next Thurs- day evening, at the Glendower Hall at 6 p.m. G.W.R. Contract.— Mr D J Evans, propiietor of The Stores, Ooodwick, his secured the contract for supplying the (T. W.R. Company's hotels and steamers with grocery, provisions, and vegetables. Upwards of forty responded to the Company's advert for lenders and the successful one is fully equal to meet all demands however great, with complete satisfaction. It could not have been better placed.

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Family Notices

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