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SUCCESSFUL GATHERINGS.

Second Day's Proceedings.

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Second Day's Proceedings. Unfortunately for the success of the Eis- teddfod, Tuesday opened out dull and unpro- mising. Rain fell in torrents in the early morning, and continued to descend until well in the afternoon. The attendance during the morning was consequently very meagre. There was, however, a large crowd when the female choir competition was timed, and when the brass band competition commenced about 2.30 the spacious marquee was comfortably full, and the attendance at this juncture was very gratifyin, despite the inclemency of the weather, and the exceedingly sloppy state of the ground. During the day over 7,000 must have paid for admission, which compared most favourably with the attendance on the previous day. Mr D. W. Davies, J.P., C.C., presided over Tuesday's proceedings' in the place of Mr W. W. Hood, who was unavoidably absent. Mt E. H. Davies. J. P. C.C., Brynhculog, PCIl- tre, acted in the capacity of conductor, and acquitted his duties most efficiently, keeping tVj vast audience under splendid control. The proceedings throughout were of a very inter- esting nature, some of the competitions being most keenly contested, while the audience were in the best of humours throughout. The following are the various results: — PIANOFORTE SOLO. The second day's proceedings commenced with a pianoforte solo contest for persons un- (le, 12 years. The test piece was a "Sonatina in D" (Clemente), with a first prize of 10s 6d: second, 5s. This contest proved a very keen and interesting one. with 20 competitors. Dr McNaught, in delivering his adjudication, stated that the competition was a very inter- esting one, and that he was glad to find that pianoforte playing was being cultivated in Wales. On the instrumental side, Wales was weak. The Welsh should be stimulated to cultivate the study of instruments. Referring to the little players in this competition, he said they had played bath delightfully and admir- abiy. Out of a possible 60 marks. Miss Rose II Silkstone (Singers' Branch, Pontypridd) ob- tained 48, Miss Gertrude George, Tredegar, coming second with 46. The decision was greeted with loud cheering. WELSH RECITATION. Mr W. Davies and Miss Jane Haddock were the successful contestants in the Welsh recita- tion competition, open to persons over 14 years. A splendid interpretation of "Y Dy- ml.cstl Olaf" (Islwyn) was given. The prizes awarded were: 1st, 10s 6d; 2nd, 5s (given by Mr W. Williams. Glamorgan Restaurant, and M" J. Protheroe, butcher, Tcnypandy, re- spectively). LADIES' CHORAL COMPETITION. Undoubtedly this competition proved one oi th > most popular and interesting of Tuesday's performances. The spacious marquee by this time was comfortably etill, and perfect order reigned throughout. Four choirs competed, and their performances were lustily cheered, an t came in for a most enthusiastic reception. They competed in the following order: (1) Tre- heibert Ladies' Choir, conducted by Mr How- ell Howell. Pentre, in the absence of his bro- ther; (2) Tonypandy Choir (conductress, Mrs Ivor Foster), (3) Swansea Choir (Miss M. A. Jones), (4), Mountain Ash (Mr T. Glyndwr Richards), who took the place of his daughter. Miss A. Glyndwr Richards, she being indis- posed. The test pieces were (a) "You stole my love" (Macfarren). (b), "Gwenith Gwyn" (D. Emlyn Evans). Minimum voices, 30; maximum, 40, for which a prize of E12 and a cruet stand to the conductor (given by Mr J. Cox, Tonypandy) was given, and a second prize of £ 3. In giving his adjudication. Dr Mc- Naught observed that matters bad been rather complicated in arriving at a decision owing to two pieces having been entered for competi- tion one choir might have sung one piece very well, and the other not quite so well. As the pieces, however, were of a different char- acter, it afforded an opportunity of testing the choirs on both sides ,and thus prevent the bringing out of only one side of the possibilL ties. Speaking of the choirs as a whole, he said there had been a want of balance in the choirs in the piece "You stole my love," ow- ing to the altos having to be divided into two sections. The first choir displayed a capital tone, and blending of voices in the Welsh piece were sweet âiiëí well in tune. The expression was tender and true, and the attack excellent. The wording was fair, but not first rate. In their rendering of "You stole my love." the first treble was overwhelming- too much to suit the other parts. The second alto became weak, and once the second treble also became weak, and hindered the blending of the voices. T1 e rhythm was neat, the attack clean and tidy. The second part was lacking in fire, whiich wa3 certainly contrary to the usual style of singing in Wales; in fact, they over- did it at times. The second choir showed a sweet and sympathetic tone, and a nice blend exceedingly pretty and delicate. The phrases were all beautifully taken up, and the words well-finished, with a very chaste expression. T., the second chorus the tone was pretty; Hc second alto generany was not good, not being full enough. The end was not fiery enough. This part expressed indignation of a lady, and consequently should be fiery: (Laughter). The weakness of the alto was very conspicuous, but the choir kept the pitch well throughout. Third Choir.—The balance of parts, time, and blend of the third choir were good. Al- though the balance and tone was good there was a lack of sympathy they did not enter into tl spirit of the second chorus. The phrases were fringy; they began well, but did not

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Second Day's Proceedings.