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SUCCESSFUL GATHERINGS.

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SUCCESSFUL GATHERINGS. Detailed Report. This, the third annual Eisteddfod known as thr "Gold Crown" Institution. was held as usual on Easter Monday and Tuesday. Simi lai to many of its kind, this annual event, acknowledged as the leading local Eisteddfod, is being held towards procuring funds for charitable purposes.. It has been a long-felt want in the thickly-populated district of Ton- ypandy, Llwynypia, and Ti-eaaw, to have a cottage hospital in its midst. The idea was mooted some few years back, and negotiations were instituted with a view of securing a cot- tage hospital for the neighbourhood. As yet nothing definite has been arrived at in the di- rection of commencing buil ling operations,but hopes are being entertained of a speedy re- viva!. and that ere long the long felt want will actually become a long-deserved actuality. The district is situated in the midst of end- less commercial traffic, and the various col- lieries of the Glamorgan Colliery Company, with iLs able representatives, Messrs Archibald and W. W. Hood; Clvdach Vale and B'aen- »!ydac(h pollieries, employing collectively as they do some thousands of men. These facts alone commend to the public the desirability an' the necessity of public institutions, which would a bocn to the Neighbourhood. The object-of holding the Gold Crown Eis- teddfod therefore is to provide money towards forming the nucleus of a fund for maintaining tJ: hospital when it is established; and also xowaras contributing a sum for the mainten- ance of the new and handsome public library of Tonypandy and Trealaw populace. The two-fold object of the Eisteddfod is, therefore, one deserving every respect and support from the public at large. and the indefatigable efforts extended by the promoters in the achievement of their object. is certainly to be commended. The vicinity of Tonypandy and itj inhabitants are greatly indebted to the energetic efforts of a few enterprising and persevering townsmen, who by their sacrificing will and determination have in past years fought hard to provide for the public every facilities in the way of public institutions. Twenty-five years' ago a number of the leading inhabitants held an Eisteddfod in the place with tha object of rendering assistance to the es esteblishment and maintenance of public li- braries in Tonypandy, Llwvnypia, and Dinas. Thanks to the untiring efforts of Mr David Jones (now assistant overseer), the results of the initial labours were exceedingly satisfac- tory, and the first Eisteddfod vras the means of contributing hundreds of pounds worth of valuable books to such institutions, Such com- mendable success at the inauguration has borne forth good fruits, and the neighbourhood has piospered thereby. The community at large have always extended willing support to every charitable object started in the district, and to the annual event under notice in particular, there has been an elaborate amount of patron- age extended. Two years ago the installation of the Gold Crown event was attended with unprecedented success. An attractive pro- gramme, superb entries, and magnificent sup- port. enabled the committee to desposit a sur- plus of £ 200 odd at the bank. Last year, un- fortunately. the regrettable coal crisis, and other minor incidents, interfered mateJrially with the success of the affair, and in conse- quence it is only to be said that it just cleared its way, which, after all, when all is taken into consideration, wns exceedingly gratifying. This year's event was looked forward to with unusual interest, but despite the energetic efforts of the hard-working committee, an- other obstacle presented itself, and which was counted to affect the proceedings considerably, as far as the first day was concerned. This was the important counter-attraction in the Mountain Ash Eisteddfod, which was held on Monday last, and interfered greatly with the entries and attendance. Whatever may have been the reason the committee this year re- duced the expenditure and curtailed the ex- tent of the chief prizes which in the last Eis- teddfodau had proved such formidable attrac- tions. But notwithstanding, the programme was a really excellent one, long and varied, and though the entries were not by far up to the usual standard, they were calculated to provide enjoyable recreation for the public. The Eisteddfod, as usual, was held in a spa- cious marquee, adapted to provide accommo- dation for about 6.000 persons, and erected on most appropriate site on the Maesyffrwd Grounds (kindly lent for the occasion by the ardent eisteddfodwr. Mr D. W. Davies, J.P., C.C., Maesyffrwd, Tonypandy). The interior of the tent was arranged in perfect order, and enabled the vast assemblage a splendid oppor- tunity of a good view and hearing. Indeed. the arrangements were perfect in every re- spect. and the comfort of the visitors abun- dantly supervised with due credit to the com- mittee. The officials of the committee were: Chairman, Mr David Jones, assistant over, seer, Bir Ivor, Llwynypia; vice-chairmen. Messrs Daniel Thomas, member of the Ystrad School Board, Trealaw, and William Law- rence, Victoria Buildings, Tonypandy; trea- surer, Mr F. Bartle Thomas. L.wynypia; se- cretary, Mr George Evans. printer, Tony- pandy. In the hands of the above, with their co-members, were left the complete working of the affair, and to them great credit must be given. The adjudicators were: Chorals, pianoforte and violin solos, Dr W. G. Mc- Naught, F.R.A.M., London; preliminaries and finals of solos, duets, and trios, Mr Ivor Foster, Exhibitioner, R.C.M.. gold medallist, Penygraig and London; brass band and drum and fife bands Mr J. Ord Hume, Fleet Hants; literary competitions, Rev B. D. Johns (Per- lian,der), Clydach Yale, while Messrs David Llovd. Tonypandy, and J. Llewelyn, ably dis- charged the duties of accompanists. MONDAY'S PROCEEDINGS. Monday morning opened out dull and un- promising. Rain fell from the early hours of the morning on till about '11 o'clock, and the attendance, though increased "later on, was evidently affected. Fortunately,, the sun shone out with marked brilliance about noon, and the rest of the day was perfectly enjoyable. Tbe attendance during the morning was per- haps barely a thousand, but nearly four thou- sand had paid for admission during the day. Tilr D. W- Davies. J.P., C.C., Maesyffrwd, acted as president for the day, and was in a serial mood, whilst the Rev E. Richards, Ton- vpandv. made a very efficient conductor. The president's address was as follows: I feel proud of the honour of presiding at this Eis- teddfod, and inasmuch as this is a mixed audi- ence, perhaps you'll kindly allow me to speak the few words I have to say in English, and if time permit I may say a few words again "y\ yr hen iaith.' The day happily is long past for apologising fcr the Eisteddfod, for cur English friends now appreciate it at nearly its true value; nay, more, if imitation be the sincerest flattery, we ought to feel proud that something in the nature of an Eisteddfod has been introduced across the Border, and also in Ireland. There is hardly any need to say that an Eisteddfod means literally a sitting, or a parliament of men of letters and culture as represented in the Druids. minstrels, and bards of old. An Eisteddfod was sometimes called a feast, for the nobles of the land in days of old ..s patrons of learning, and also from a desire to have their deeds of daring proclaimed in song thought themselves honoured by provid- ing meat and drink for the bards and min- strels, who enjoyed high privileges. The laws of Howell Dda (Howell the Good) provided that the domestic bard should receive a beast out of every spoil in which lie shall be pre- sent, and a man's share like every domestic, and if there should be- fighting, the bard was to sing the song 'Monarchy of Britain" in front of battle. His land was fre2. and a horse was in attendance trom the king, and he was next but one to the patron of the family. I fear the bards are not so liberally treated now-a-davs. The Eliceddfcdau or feasts were generally held on New dear's Day. The bards ]-1 their wanderings did a lot of good, and were always welcomed, for in those days, when there were no railways, electric telegraph, or newspapers, they served to spread important news, and to foster the patriotic spirit; in- deed, to such a degree did they kindle the patriotic enthusiasm that Edward III. passed a severe law against them. It would be inter- esting to follow the development, but time does not permit. A great Eisteddfod was held at Carmarthen by command of King Henry VI. in 14-42, and lasted 40 days. There was great feasting there. Llawdden was chief bard, and Gwilym Tew the chief singer. An- other famous Eisteddfod was held in 1789, at Corwcn. when Twm o'r Nant and Gwallter Mcchain competed. It is a notable fact that our gracious Queen Victoria in 1832. before she became Queen, was patron of an Eisteddfod at Beaumaris and in 1834 at Cardiff, and other members of the Royal Family have supported it Mr Thomas Stephens, author of "Litera- ture of the Kymry," received his prize from H.R.H. the Prince of Wales at Abergavenny. Her Majesty was alo a patron of the Royal National Eisteddfod at Cardiff in 1883. One of the chief patrons of modern days was the late Lady Llanover, and Wales owes a great deal to her for her zeal on behalf of dear old Wales, and everything belonging to it. Those who supported the Eisteddfod were people who. knowing the hungering for education of the Welsh people, helped to make it an insti- tution of educational value. Think of the names of Henry Richard, Lord Aberdare, Sir Hugh Owen, Brinley Richards, John Thomas (Pencerdd Gwalia), all of whom, except the last, have passed away, The University Col- lege of Wales and Aberystwith was established and it is a notable fact that the bulk of the money was subscribed by working-men. These friends of the Eisteddfod and hosts I have named, prepared the way, and it is due to their labours that we have now intermediate schools and a University for Wales. A notable fact is the number of ministers of the gospel who have been chaired bards: Nicander, Em- rys. Caledfryn, Islwyn, Gwalchmai, Cynddelw, Dyfed, Ben Davies, etc.. proving that our ministers of all denominations are men of proved ability. The Crown Eisteddfod is not the first of note in Tonypandy. In 1874 a grand Eisteddfod was held when Sir Joseph Barnby (his first appearance in Wales) adjudi- cated. Since then we have had Dr Turpin, Dr Mackenzie, Dr Bridge, and we must not forget that great musical friend of Wales, the late Dr Macfarren; Bennett, and many others and we are proud to welcome Dr MacNaught, whose name is a household word with Tonic Solfaists and schoolmasters trained in Bangor. The proceeds of the first Eisteddfod have pro- vided books for Penygraig, Llwynypia, and for the New Library at Tonypandy, and it is a kindly tribute to the men who have become responsible for £1,250 to build it. purely from love, for by the trust deed, no one is to make any profit from it, that the committee of the Eisteddfod have this year decided to divide lh? profits between the Library and the Cot- tage Hospital. This is only for this year, however, and the committee have not forgotten the original object of the Tonypandy Crown Eisteddfod. I am glad to see cur friend Mr Ivor Foster being honoured in his own locality, and I beg to wish him and this Eisteddfod and its objects every success. The competitions were then proceeded with in the following order:- RECITATION FOR CHILDREN UNDER 14. "Y Bywydfad" was the test piece, and five competitors stood the test for two prizes of 5 and 2s 6d respectively (given by Mr J..W. Lewis, boot merchant, Tonypandy),. Master J. J. Davies, Blaenclydach, and Master W. Morgan, Clydach Vale, were the winners of first and second prize respectively. BRASS BAND COMPETITION. For the sake of convenience this important competition was next proceeded with. It was confined to second clas3 bands (Class B), and excited a little interest. There were in all ten entries, but only six bands competed and played in the following order: 1, Aberaman Silver Prize Band; 2, Pentrc Volunteers' Brass Band; 3, Nelson Temperance Band; 4, Tonyrefail Silver Band; 5, Cory's Temper- ance Band, Pentre; 6, bertilJery Tonw Brass Band.. Marching Test (open selection).—There was a first prize of one guinea and a second prize of 10s 6d (given by Mr Lavington, Tonypandy),' for the best quick-step march, and the first prize was awarded to the Aberaman Band and second prize to Nelson Temperance Band. SELECTION COMPETITION. In the selection competitition the test piece was "Gems of Welsh Melody" (Wright and Round), and first prize was £10, with a silver cup (presented by Mr J. Klnstley, jeweller, Tonypandy) to the conductor; second prize, £ 5; third prize, L3. After a splendid com- petition, Mr J. Ord Hume delivered his adju- dication, in which he stated that the general tone of the respective bands playing was the chief thing to be taken into consideration in awarding his decision. He had no hesitation in awarding the first prize to No. 4 Band (Tonyrefail), second prize to No. 1 (Aberaman), and third prize to No. 5 (Cory's Temperance), while Nos. 3, 6. and 2 were the next in order of merit. The result appeared to give every satisfaction, and the willing conductors were invested amidst cheers. DRUM AND FIFE BAND CONTEST. There was no contest in the marching com petition, and the following bands competed in the order named on the selection, "n Travo- tore," for which there was a first prize of JE7 with a silver medal to the conductor (given by Mr W. J. Coombes, watchmaker, Tonypandy). and 23, second prize. Names and order of bands: St. Mary's Catholic, Moutnain Ash; conductor, Mr D. J. Roberts; Rechabite Band, Mountain Ash, conductor. Mr T. Coss- lett, and the Llwynypia Temperance, conduc- ted by Mr E. T. Stephenson. The first prize was awarded to No. 1 (St. Mary's), and second prize to No. 3 (Llwynypia). ENGLISH RECITATION (OPEN). A selection from Gray's "Bard" was the test for this competition, which attracted only four entries.. Only tw-,> appeared on the stage, and the prize of 10s 6d (given by Mr J W. Jones, The Schools. Tcnypandy) was ultimately divided between the contestants, who turned out to be Miss Beauchamp, Tre- alaw, and Miss B. W. Roberts. Blaengarw. PIANOFORTE SOLO (FOR PERSONS UNDER 16). Nineteen competitors stood the preliminary ten*. in th.s competition, the test piece ot which was "Sanatina in C" (Kuhlan). The prizes were: First, 103 6d; second, 7s 6d, and third, 3; Sd. Four appeared on the stage, and the prices were awarded to Miss Maggie Lewis, P.usmarl. first; Master Samuel Lewis, Rhym- ncy, second; and Miss Ada Thomas, Ton, Pentre, third (pupil of Mr David Lloyd, Tony- pandy)) In the violin solo. for which a prize 0: one guinea was offered, there were no en- tries, and consequently no competition. JUVENILE CHOIR COMPETITION. T, sopranos and contraltos only, not over 50 in number. In this interesting item, there was a great deal of interest, and six choirs entered the arena and sang in the fololwing order:—1. Blaenclydach Juvenile (conductor, Mr John Evans); 2, Salem Juvenile Choir, Llwynypia (conductor, Mr P. Llewelyn); 3. Saron, Nantyffyllon (conductor, Mr G. E. Thomas), 4, Maesteg United Juvenile; 5, Go- bait h y Rhos, Mountain Ash (conductor, Mr S. Powell); 6, Gosen, Blaenclydach). The test piece was "Cysegriarl" (Tom Price), and two prizes were offered, the first being £ 7, with a copy of "Songs of Wales" to the con- ductor (given by Mr Howells, stationer, Pandy) second prize, JE3. The competition was a very spirited and keen one, and elicted deserved appreciation. Dr McNaught, in giving his adjudication, put the maximum a 60, and awarded the first prize to No. 5 (Gobaith y Rhos, Mountain Ash), who had 50 marks, and whose singing was really superior. The second prize was awarded to No. 3 choir, who received 47 marks, the others in point of merit being Salem (44 marks), Blaenclydach and Gosen (40 marks each), while Maesteg United only re- ceived 36 marks, but unfortunately broke down when near the finish after a brilliant opening. PIANOFORTE SOLO (OPEN). Only two competitors came forward to com- pete for the prize of one guinea (given by Mr D n. Davies, draper* Pandy). The test piece was "Fantasia in C Minor," and appeared to be singularly difficult, while both contestants had played from two different editions. The best rendering was that by Miss Adelina George Tredegar, who secured the prize. DUET (TENOR AND BASS). "Hen Gastelli Cymru," composed by a local musician, Mr W. T. David, organist, Tonypan- dy;, was the test in this competition. There were only three entries, and one party alone stepped to the platform. Their performance wa; deemed worthy of the prize, two guineas (given by Mr D. C. Evans (Asaph Rhondda), Miskin Hotel). The winning party were Messrs W. Rees (Eos Cynffig). Kenfig Hill, and Dd. Williams, Penygraig. Mr Ivor Foster, in this adjudication, made his initial appearance be- fore the audience in the role of adjudicator, and being introduced by the conductor, re- ceived a hearty reception. CONTRALTO SOLO. Seventeen competitors stood the test at the preliminary in this competition on the piece "God shall wipe away all tears" (Sullivan's "The Light of the World"), for which best ren- dering there was a prize of 21 11s 6d (given by Messrs Jones and Evans, Commerce House. Pandy). Two young ladies appeared on the stage in the final, and there was a splendid competition. The prize was ultimately divided between the two aspirants, Miss Lizzie Genry, Penrhiwceiber, and Miss Blodwen Thomas, Trealaw (daughter of Mr Daniel Thomas, mem- ber of the Rhondda School Board, Trealaw), Miss Thomas' success was distinctly encourag- ing, inasmuch as it was her first attempt in the competitive arena, and for her age, being only 14, she promises well, and is a credit to her teacher, Mr David Lloyd, Tonypandy. ESSAY. "Old Characters of the Rhondda Valley and their Characteristics." was the subject of the essay competition, for which there was offered a prize of two guineas (gien by Mr David Jones, assistant overseer, and chairman of committee). Only three essays were received, and the competition was not of a very high standard. The adjudicator ultimately decided to divide the prize between the three competi- tors, who were Messrs Jonathan Rees (Nathan Wyn), Ystrad; W. James (Gwilym Iago), Dinas, and John Evans, Coychurch, Bridgend. PART-SONG COMPETITION. A prize of two guineas (given by Mr W. Thomas, White Hart Hotel, Pandy), was offered for the best composition of a part song suitable for ladies' choir. There were three compositions received, and the prize was un- hesitatingly awarded to Mr T. D. Edwards, Hopkiustown, Pontypridd. BARITONE SOLO. "Cambrian War Song," from the "Songs of Wales." was the test piece in this competition, which attracted 10 competitors to the prelimi- nary test. Of these three were selected to appear in the final. The singing was not of a very high order, but Mr Ben Devonald, Ton, Pentre, was undoubtedly superior, and gained the adjudicator's award, securing the prize of £1 lis 6d. MALE VOICE COMPETITION (SECOND CLASS). This was an innovation introduced by the Executive, open to parties who had not pre- viously won over j520. This was undoubtedly the important event of the day, but the inter- est and enthusiasm reached but a nominal maximum. Eleven parties had entered, but only five competed, and sang in the following order: 1, Mid-Rhondda Male Voice Party (con- ducted by Mr D. J. Hickman); 2, Blaenclyd- ach Music Lovers (Mr Benjamin Davies); 3, Garn Fach, Nantyglo (Mr W. H. Jones); 4, Mardy Male Voice Party (Mr John Michael, (Eos Gerran)); 5, Cwmaman Music Lovers (Mr D. T. Bowen). The test piece was "Little Church (Becker). The singing was throughout of a very entertaining nature, and a keen com- petition ensued. A great deal of excitement was evinced in the result, and loud cheers greeted the success of the No. 2 Choir (Blaen- clydach), who, with 49 marks out of 60, se- cured the first prize of JE20, while the conduc- tor was entitled to a pair of the celebrated K boots (presented by Alderman Richard Lewis Tonypandy). No. 4 Choir (Mardy), who se- cured 47 marks, received the second prize of E5, the conductor to receive a pair of trousers, valued a guinea (given by Mr David Jones, tailor). The others in order of merit were No. 5, Cwmaman, 45 marks; No. 3. Garn Fach, 43 marks; No. 1, Mid-Rhondda, 33 marks. This concluded the proceedings of the day. The second choral competition, for which therc. were offered two prizes of £20 and JE5, fell through owing to no entries having been re- ceived. Though the competitions in general lucked the keenness and interest usually no- ticeable, the proceedings of the day were quite enjoyable, and carried out with every punctu- ality desirable. ♦

Second Day's Proceedings.

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Second Day's Proceedings.