Hide Articles List

11 articles on this Page

[Y,6 CIVEN AWAY. I-

The World of Pastime. ■—♦

News
Cite
Share

The World of Pastime. ■— ♦ By "The Sporting Scribe." The consolation prize has this week been divided between MR. J K KESVYN, Rudry, and MR. JOHN Wu LKWIS, 1, Rhymney Cottages, Walnut Tree Bridge. By their brilliant- victories over Llwynypia and Plymouth. Mountain Ash proved their right to be considered a team of more than average merit, and that right has pretty generally been conceded them. Their fixtures with Pontypridd therefore. was looked upon with some degree of trepidation by the supjiorrers of the latter club, who thought their pets had to-j big a job on to successfully account for the Mountaineers, and so it iro voi, although it, must at once said that the homesters were decidedly unlucky in haying thirteen points scored against their three. There were several absentws on both sides, Deere, Parry Innes, and Edmunds being away from the Mountain Ash side, whilst Warlow, Wayne Morgan, and Chick were missing from the Pontypr". l ranks. Mr A. J. Davies, Car- (ufI: lÍad charge of the whistle. The ground was in a ve-rv sodden condition, and the slippery state of the ball prevented any display of pass- ing given by eitiaer set of bark.s. consequently the game became chiefly a forward one. Immediately after the kick-off the homesters began to press, and while the game was new Bunston dropped for goal, but the ball went wide ,and a minor only resulted. Not to be denied the home forwards aO'ain went to work w- a will, and a scrum being formed in the visitors' line, Doran received and passed to Roberts, the latter easily beatiilg the visiting halves and scoring a really pretty try, which was not converted. Following the drop-out Pontypridd again invaded the Mountain Ash territory, but a long kick by one of the visitors sent the ball to the home 25, where Davies, Bunston. and Morgan failed to hold it. and Griffiths dribbled over, Phillips convcning the try. In the first half the homesters had greatly the best of matters, but now the visitors buckled to and had equally as much of the argument. Several chances to score were lost by both sides owkig to the greasy condition of the ball, which could not be handled with any degree of accuraej". About this stage Mountain Ash ob- tained under peculiar circumstanees. and the decision of the referee cause a good deal of dissatisfaction among the crowd. Muxworthv, from the home 25, put in a bic, punt, sending the ball across the line, where Millar was stand- ing behind the posts, about fifteen yards off- side, and who promptly touched down, a try being awarded. The ball in its flight touched some of the homesters, possibly, but to award a try for play of that description was absurd, A little while later. Perrot again scored for tbe visitors, and the final score read: Mountain Ash, two goals, and one tr" Pontypridd, one try. Certainly, Pontypridd were not ten points inferior to Mountain Ash, for during the major portion of the game they were pressing almost continuously. Mr A. J. Davies did not by am means gives satisfaction, and -in one ease his ruling was a peculiar one. Millar and Walt. Davies were rushing for the ball in the home 25 when Davies, put his hand on iuiilar's shoulder, thereby preventing 'him possibly from scoring a try. The referee blew his whistle, and awarded a free' kick to—Ponty- pridd! Rather funny, that! On the day's form, a draw would more accu- rately represented the game, for with most of their backs missing Mountain. Ash did not play up to form, whereas Pontypridd gavo a more 11 0 than average display, but at the critical moment they failed. Considering the state of the ground ,?arae Proved far from uninteresting, but the bulk of the work was done by the forwards, both packs occasionally giving a good exhibition of the dribbling game. In me scnuns the visi- tors obtained the bell nine times out of ten, but their efforts went for not-hina- owing to the smartness of the opposing pair of halves. Again, Pontypridd failed to heel out and this now appears to be a eomphust which is past remedying. What is the cause of it? A few practices^ at nights should put this matter ri"ht. Let us hone a vast improvement will take place in this direction in the near future. At full back Mountain Ash haJ a little the fcetfer of the argument, -v therwnv playing a sound and safe game, although Llew. Morgan atckled well, and cave a good exhibi- tion, but his kicks lacked the length of his opponent's. At thrr--e quarter Muxworthv was the b?wi innn on the fi°id. doin" the bulk of the work for his ?i<<<\ and h;i wa.s well supi'ort^d by Fmrys Griffiths. For the homesters J Walt. "Oavi rilaved well, as f1if1 also th" new recruit 1.l;' Button W:15 the bplter cf tins cent-res, C'I1PIn.;n;s lhieg- decidedly off colour previous to Irs accident. Phillips and Hillman did not shine with that brilliancv which generally characterises their play epspeciaily that of the former, and ltobprts an 1 Doran gave them as good as they received, if rot more. On Saturday's form, Roberts was the pick of the four halves, while Doran put .n some v"'y effective dribbles, although he was prone to off-side tan ie". I In the homesters* front rant Rowley Thomas was the most conspicuous, playing a really fine game. J. W, James, Bryant, and Wilson were the pick of the remainder. For Mountain Ash Millar took pride of j la • "loscly followed by Perroit and Fryer. On Saturday, Bridgend i. latter's ground, and though playing with but a remnant of their usual team, the cupholders completely accounted for the visitors to the tune or 7 tries to nil. Alexander and Bob Jones were away from the forwards: Iestyn Thomas at half, and Isaac Edmunds and Ben Morgan from the three-quarter line. D. Royal, one of last year's invineibles, and the old stal- wart Jim Hadridge, were put into the pack. while Ben Phillips, a sterling forward at all times. bOK up Iestyn's position at outside half. Then George Mills, another of the invincibles, partnered Foster on the left, while Willie Llew- elyn played centre to his younger brother, Evan. But it appears that Bridgend were also without some of Uicir usual piayers, Hayman. a. heavy, dashing forward, being the chief absentee. The ground, whoh was in a very heavy condition, seemed uite unfavourable to fast display of football, and the small crowd of intense enthu- siasts that lined th2 ropes must have- been very agreeably surprised by the really dashing and enjoyable game that, was played. The home barks and forwards, i'-uuhiiK.'d in a beautiful I't dton and were soon making a direct line for the visitor's citadel. It- downfall was accomplished after some pretty plav on the left wing,George Mills signalling Jus lirst appear ance this snason on the home enclosure by scoring a wtli-deserved try. Thru the forwards took up tha running and Hellings after a brilliant dribble and using capital judgment scored a try quite near the posts. Soon after, George Mills, all on his own account put another try to his credit right under the post&.which wa.s ouieklv followed by a try by Jack Boweu. In tho second half, Ben Philips, Foster, and Llewelyn all scored tries, but the kicking for goal, though decidedly "off," was yet a source much amusement, both among the players and spectators. Taking ail t ilings into consideration it must, be admitted that th*- combination among the home t"am was nearly perfect, while Bridgend, tiiough playing a really hard game, and indeed at times attacking sironglv, were completely lacking in this respect. It is to the good understanding existing between the home- players and the bad understanding between their own (players) that Bridgend must attri but-e so decisive a. defeat. Amongst the players worthy of mention :n the home ranks, first and foremost comes Ben Phillips as outside half. The manner"in which he set the third line in motion was a revelation. He took has passes beautifully, and gave them up again unselfishly. His jud-ment wasl splen- did throughout. He neither did a rash nor a bad thing. All in all a better half-back game has not, been played on the ground this season, and it would be a good thing to put him there occasionally. In the threc-quartor lino, though all worked well and hard, particularly Poster, George iililU was the shining- light, and he reminded as for- cibly of the invincible days. Hellings played a magnificent game, and was closely attended by George Evans. Jones at full back was irre- proachable, and once had the hardest of hard lines in not scoring a try. On the opposing side Jem. Matthews played a neat hard game. The game with Treorky at the Buturills was looked upon at Barry as the only clianoe the homesters possessed of saving that much-dreaded "'wooden spoon" falling to their lot; and, inas- much as they failed to pull the match off, they are now doomed to occupy ine lowest position in the League, as there is little hope of their defeating either Treherbert or Llwynypia in the two remaining League fixtures. The match was played under the most miserable climatic conditions, a high wind and heavy sleet rain not being conducive to good play, and only a small number of speetatorg witnessed the game. The visitors were fairly represented, but the homesters were without J. Jones and T. Dow- deswell in the three-quarter line. Mr R. Gar- rett., Penarth, officiated with the whistle. Treorky were unfortunate in flie spin, and, consequently, had to play with the wind and rain in their faces. Falcon's kick off was very smartly taken on by two or three of the for- wards. and Barry were at once placed on the defensive. Some kicking by Jcnkms and Cloke relieved their line, and the forwards took the ball to the visiting quarters, where some exciting play was witnessed. The Barryites, aided bj the wind., pressed severely, and on one or two occasions had hard lines in not crossing; but I over-anxiety lost them some golden opportunities, and nothing more than two or three minors fell to their credit. Several free-kicks were awarded the visitors, but were of little avail aiainst the wind: and they had all anxious time of it. in defending their lines against the continued atlacks of th,, homesters. Their de- termined tackling, however, wa.s the means of keeping their lino intact, and when ihe interval arrived neither sid., had anything tangible to I their credit. When they crossed over and had to play ¡ against the wind and rain, it. seemed as if Barry would once more have to suffer defeat. The opciung stages, however, were rather surpris- ing. as Barry got right down to the Treorky lino, and after making bt "cnJlotlS efforts to cross, a shout went up as Chick seamed to tlirow himself over th^ line:. but apparently he just failed to reach the lire, as a serum was formed on tha spot. The visitors now worked up the field, where some very rough play wa indulged in by both sides, the result of wliieh was that one of the visitors was led off the tidd badly iniured, and shortly afterwards A. Jenkins, Barry, was ordered off the field by the referee for raising his right leg to kick an opponent. Both teams were now playing a man short, and,, on the whole, the visitors had the best of matters. For fully ten minutes before tlie end. the visitors hotly assailed the home line, and had their halves passed out a little smarter, they would probably have reiurntvi home with two points. The homesters somehow or other managed to repel tha assaults made on their citadel, and time arrived with the score stand- { ing,:—Barry, three minors; Treorky, two iinors. Tic game was one of the pooit st. witnessed on the Buttrills this season, being of a scrambling nature throughout, and only on very rare ocea- sions was tha ball handled by the back=. A draw was a fair citerion of the merits of the two elubs, as neither deserved to win. In point of physique the Barry -ack had the pull, but the visiting eight were exceptionally smart in fh^ loose, whilst in the scrummages everyone did his level beet,and the Treorky pack had the best of Jhe argument in nine out of everv ten scrums that- were formed. At half matters were fairly even, but Ringwald was penalised time after time for his offside tactics, which con- siderably handicapped the Treorky pair. Tho threequarf ers of both sides were very moderate, but in the latter stages of the game the Barrv quarteete were beaten by the opposing third line. Tlius it will be seen that, if anything, the visitors had rat-lier the best of matters, and should have pulled the game off had thr-y passed a little smarter in the closing portions of the game. Mabbs, the Barry custodian, was erratic at I times, and his play throughout was far from satisfactory. Chick was the only threequarter who did himself jus' A Jenkins was fairly well in the first hall, but through losing his temper he was ordered off before the second half was very far advanced; and, as a whole, the display of the quartette was feeble in the extreme. J. Davies was the b"<rl. of the halves, Ringwald completely spoiling his play by off-side play, and thus causing his side to be penalised with a regularity that was considerably calling to the home partisans. T. Jones F. Deans, and D. Triggs- were the pick of the front rank. who had a huge pull in weight, and it was rather a surprise to sec them beaten bv a much lighter lot. Their following up was not so smart as usual, whilst their work in the loose left much to be desired. Coming to the visitors it must be sail ,„iat T. John, their back, was superior to Mabbs in every department of the game, and was verv s-niart in picking thte ba; up from tJw feet of the Barry forwards.. In tfvp third linA, Lewis and Evans, the two wings, performed very well, but. were not fc ) by the centres (who missed several good openings that were made for them by the halves), as th".v should have been. Jones and .James, in the centra, were rather weak at times, in tak:n<r the ball, but both rut in seme good defensive work. The two halves (James and \Vh'fe> were very active on tin- fringe of the wriim. and. although hampered by tho off-side taeties of the home halves, they got through their work in a very prai^worthy m;>ner. Falcon far and awav th.' best forward on the 11..1.1 fcie dribbling and the way in wlreh he rushed the ball out of danger being ihe redeeming feature of his side's displav, whilst h,; gencra'shin of the forwards was no- il.inp short, of brilliant. J. Davies, who had t(, the, field iliroii!-Ii ni) in the s.conti half, was o-filv on the ball, whilst follow- in- rum in order of merit came Wat kins and Thomas: and. in short, the whole of the pack worke l like Troians, •••- one ever worked harder for victory than they di4 on Naturdav. < The Barry Seconds oft' i • -tor'ons in tho second round for the M^ltt Shield, thev de- 1 feating the Car-'iff St. Mary's on tho Sophia Gardens, Cardiff by one goal, one try, to one try. Dowdeswell and Burston were the try- geiters for Barry, and Collins scored for the Saints. The Association Club had another open date on Saturday last, but have now several im portant League fixtures to play when they in- tend to strain every nerve to again place them- selves at the head of the League table. The only Association match in the Barry District 011 Saturday last was that between the Thirds ynd Oiinton, the Thirds winning by eleven coals love. The Thirds have only lost once this season, and have scored nearly one hun- dred goals, whilst not p dozen has been regis- tered against them. The Treherbert- fifteen was on Saturday pit- ted against the Crumlin fifteen at Treherbert ill wet weather and before a small crowd. Mr Baker. Morthyr, was the referee. The home- sters were victorious by one goal two tries to a goal (11 points to five). It appeal's that there has been a ''rumpus" in tke Treherbert rookery, and unless something is done at onco to remedy matters, it is feared that, the team will be in a sad state before the end of the season. Some dissatisfaction with tha players has been expressed for some time, but on Saturday th discordance among certain members of the team took form, and Trt herl>ert were able to turn out, but a. few of their regular rlayers, the absentees being W. Davies and W. Thomas of the quartette, Rees of the halves,and Jenkins and ,wed of the forwards. This caused a complete disarrangement of the team. What is the exact cause of the disturb- ance ia not known, but it, is said that some of the most prominent members of the team have decided not to again appear for Treherkert. It is to be hoped that. this will not prove true,but that the team will again flourish and maintain the reputation it has already gained. To return to the game of Saturday. It. was but a mere scramble from beginning to end. The visitors played only 13 men throughout the game and were thws severely handicapped. At the commencement the homesters at once as- sumed the aggressive aud penned their oppo- nents closely. Lewis Lewis having hard lines in not scoring. But after eight minutes' play, Tom Davies obtained possession. and in his own inimi- table style, scored a. splendid try. After this the play deteriorated, and by loose play among tho forwards, the visitors were able to show up and commenced to attack. After besieging the citadel for a long time, they were rewarded with a try by Banfield, and which was converted. This gave them a lead of two points. A few minutes after Treherbert had scored Ditly, ,the back, but who now played at. half, was injured, and this made mat- ters more even in numbers, 14 to 13. After half- time the visitors were again to the fore. their kicking and loose rushes proving of invaluable service, and up to within the last few minutes they had the best of the play. The game was pulled out of the fire by two tries being scored in the last few minutes. Taken all through the visitors had the best of the game. The weather and the condition of the leather militated against open play, and the result was that, rushes were the order of the day and in this department the visitors were ahead. For the homesters Thomas at back was fair, and Tom Davies and Lewis Lewis were the pick of the quartette, although the latter was at times a little "funky" in collaring. Blleh- ings and Jones played well.Emlyn Lewis played a fair game at half. Of the forwards Price, Kirkhouso, Ramsey, and Thomas were uie pick. For the visitors Banfield, Gower, Lewis, Booth man, and the full-back were the most prominent of a hard working team, who experienced hard lines in not winning. Treherbert did not de- serve to win, a-s they were too tame, and had they not awakened up towards the finish, they would have bad to partake of the sour tastes of defeat. On Saturday, the old rivals Porth and Nelson met upon tho Llwyncelvn Grounds. Porth lacked in their men, Jenkins (captain )and W. H. Picken being absent, and Porth-, may well congratulate themselves upon the result of the gamo, which was a draw. each side scoring three goals. The game throughout was very interesting, and despite the miserable rain which fell during the day, there was a very large crowd of spectators. Borthwick, W. Williams and C. Jones were the pick of the Porth team, and two of the .goals were scored-uy Jones, and I Fudgo put the other in. An important general meeting of the members and supporters of the Pontypridd Football Club will be held at the White Hart- Hotel on Friday next, the 18th at 8 p.m., when all inter- ested in the club are earnestly requested to at- tend. To the Editor. Dear Sir,—I note a contemporary of vours stated in a recent issue that, the players of the Pontypridd Club have been promised caps sever- al weeks ago. Doubtless it will be news to this "goo a-head know all" to IK- informed that the players received these caps something like 7 or 8 weeks ago.—Yours, etc., A Supporter and Not a, Detractor of the Old Club.

PONTYPRIDD COUNTY SCHOOL

Purified Petroleum after Influenza.

Advertising

CAERPHILLY DISTRICTI COUNCIL.

Advertising

PONTYPRIDD GUARDIANS.

THE TON CHAIR EISTEDDFOD.

Advertising

CAERPHILLY DISTRICTI COUNCIL.