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<51ANU?TGAN0IITTE. OPENING OF THE BUTE SHIP CANAL. (From our own Correspondent.) CardilT, Tuesday Evening. To day has been one of bustle and preparation and anticipation is on the very tiptoe. Unlike some of its more initiiedirtte predecessors, it, has been remark- ably flue, with the exception of a few slight drops of rain in the afternoon. Hie general appearance of the sky, moreover, betokens a beaming morrow; and sliould tile pro, ise not be broken, there is no doubt that thousands upon thousands will slmrc the festivi- ties, gaieties, and rejoicings of the d-iv. So numerous have been tin? arrivals, it will be a matter of wonder where or how they can all find beds. Kvery inn is already full to overfl owing and almost every private house is in the same condition. Indeed very'many of those who Imve neglected to bespeak sleeping apartments, will find it a matter of consider- able difficulty to obtain a bed of any kind. Sofas and cuairs will 'u; *cry generally substituted; and even these additional means and appliances are likely to fail. A iititiibci* of respectable individuals have availed themselves of the opportunity the beatitiflil day has afforded, of visiting the magnificent undertaking, the. near approach to completion of which, is the occasion of the present festivities. Though the Bute Docks have from time to time been fully described ill onr columns, no doubt that a brief description on the present occasion will be acceptable to the majority of our readers. Passing along Bute Street, and the road with which it communicate* in a direct line, the spectator arrives at a bridge buil t of iron, and of a particularly tixht and elegant construction, which crosses the cut con- necting the new with the old canal. Arrived on the summit of this bridge, the eye at once embraces a magnificent open basin, 1,400 yards in length, slightly curving to the right in its approach to the sea. The width is 200 feet. Thus covering an area of up wards of 18scres, and affording accommodation forat least 300 vessels. One fialfuf this vast extent of water hasadepth of nineteen feet; the other half, twenty four; a cross, cut in the quay walls, marking the spot where the difference in the depth occurs. The most laborious And expensive art of the work is now hid entirely from view, since the water was sudered to fill this extensive basin; but the immense massivewalls with strong granite counts, for about three-fourths of the length, were a siijht well worth seeing, while in progress of erection. The execution of the whole is of ifie. strongest and best description; no expense having boen sparid to render the undertaking capable of resisting the w;ar and tear of centuries. Wooden (It-fenders are phced at regular intervals along the whole length of the quay walls, as well as in the basins, and the outer sea walls; and immensely massive mooring losts of granite are also distributed over the whole Ictgth of the quay. We now come to what is called tht main entrance lock, which is 152 feet long and 36 fe;t wide su flieient for the ad mission of ships of 900 tois burthen. 1 his leads to the outer basin, having an irea of about all acre and a half, in- tended for the accommodation of vessels of very great tonnage, and steoners. At the southern extremity of this are the seagates, which are lo feet wi(lc;-twi) feet wider than aiy gates at Bristol. At low water a straight open clnnnel is visible, extending from the sea gates to the niddle of CardiH Roads; — which will be kept free from the deposits of mud, front the sur- rounding lands, br the action of a water course and feeder from the rwer Taff, to an immense reservoir 15 acres in extent, which will discharge its contents at low water; and uhich it is anticipated will prove am- ply sullicient to keep the channel clear. The depth of water at the sea fates will to-morrow morning be 32 feet; being a spring tide; the depth at neap tides being 17 feet. We need olllyadd that the whole of this gigantic undortaking has been conductcd at the sole expense of th; Marquess of Bute. Amongst the many means of conveyance for visi- tors, the Bristol Steam Navigation Company dis. patched all extra vessel this afternoon, which proved a great convenieice to a considerable number of sight-seers. There will be at least two triumphal irelies,-oile in each parish; aid here all:1 there we have observed preparations for illuminations for to-morrow evening. Wednesday morning. A thrilling blast from the trumpets of the Giamor- ganshire Band, at five yYloek this mo'tiiiig, summoned udji i'i.i.i iur uour after, the streets were crowded; and on tlie merry bells of St. John pealing forth about six o'clock, we suppose everv individual in Cardiff was stirring, and heard their joyous sounds. Precisely at seven o'clock the procession having been marshalled in the Castle grounds, moved forward in the following order:— on pER OF PllOCESStON, ,,10. MUll labourers: four deep. Masons, mason's a"d other persons employed at the Docks, four deep. Trades of various branches, two deep. plains and Banners. Cardiff School Cial) itid other Clubs two deep. Two fla, Band of Odd Fellows: four deep. Gentlemen and tradesmen; two deep. Flags and Banners. Glamorgan Band. Superintendent of Police. Serjeants at Mace. Corporation of Cardiff. The Most Honourable Flag. TIIR MAWQUESS OF RurR. Flag, supported 011 bis ri&ht by Charles Croft Williams, Esq., the M«yor of Cardiff; and on his lc^ by ^0,tl James Stuart. rootiiien. Recruiting Party. As the procession moved along, every window was thronged with ch;Santty dressed females; the houses being decorated with flowers and evergreens; while in many places garlands were thrown across the streets, decorated wIth banners and uiottos applicable to the occasion. The procession moved on foot along lligh Street, croslit)," thc Canal Bridge, along Bute Street; and 011 ;irrivilig at the Iron Bridge crossing1 the connecting cut, it turned to the left, one liaif walking on one side of the inner Basin, and one In If on the other; Lord Bute and the Corporation keeping to the western side. Having arrived -it the Sea Gates, Capt. Smyth. R.N., received his Lordship; formally putting him in possession, as it were, of the magnilicent Docks. I- The procession having arrived at the iiitit-r lot-k, they divided, so as to allow the Marquess of Bute, the Cor- poration of Carditf, alld the noble lord's personal friends to pass through them when they followed his lordship over the gates to the opposite side. The Marquess of Bute, Lord James Stuart, the Mayor and Corporation, and other respectable gentle- men having taken up their position on the east side of the gates, under an awning erected for the occasion, they were thrown open 011 the approach of the Lady Charlotte steamer, which passed through precisely at a quarter to eight, amidst loud cheers from every part of the vast assembly. The Lady Charlotte, was fol- lowed by the Glamorgan steam tu, the band playing "Itule Britannia," and the crowd hiuzaing most vociferously. Tllc scene at this moment was truly imposing. The number of people assembled was variously estimated at from twelve to twenty thou- sand and considering that every road leading to Car diff, was yesterday literally crowded with foot passen- gers, and vehicles of every "description, to say nothingof those who airived early this morning,—and tileveiiiie in shoals,—we should say the lower number was cer- tainly under the mark. Every individual appeared in super-excellent spirits; and as if they were deter- mined to be in the very best humour. III fact throughout the whole proceedings the veiy best order possible was preserved not a littleof the credit being due to the active Supeiiutetuleid of I Slockdale, and the body of men who acted under his orders. III this way stood matter. when the schooner Ce- lerity, (a Cardiff and London trader) arrived at the outer gates, her yard3 manned, and every part of the vessel being covered with flasks and banners to a profu- sion. Siie was also verv gaily decorated with wreaths and evergreens. Three cheers were given as she en. tered, and a graiuf salute was fired from the shore. Thr tlnesl sight was now to come: the ship illanlhis, the arrival of which from Quebec had been expected for the last few days, happened to reach the roads last night, in time to come in with the tide this morning; in fact she never cast anchor. The Manlius is an American ou ilt ship, 703 tons measurement, but having on board 1000 tons of timber for Messrs. Watson, & Co of Cardiff. The moment the steam tug had towed her into the basin, a grand salute was fired, and the cheers of the multitude, first for the Marquess of BlIte, and then for the Manlins, were deafening. The noble Lord returned the cheers bv bowing repeatedly to the crowd, and his lordship's gratification seemed to be complete. Nothing in fact, could have been more opportune than the arrival of this fine ship, which, as she drew no less than 18 feet, G inches, water, served to shew more completely the iratoeusc capabilities of-thg porks, It1 was difficult to say whether Lord James Stuart, or the Marquess of Bute seemed most gratified, as they stood beside each other, surrounded by their numer- ous friends. The Thomas, a United States'ship entered next; while repeated salutes followed from the various craft, which were returned by tlie guns planted close to the outer Dock. A Bristol steamer, the'Samson, after- wards, entered in grand style. The gates were then closed, and three more cheers were given by the crowds oti both sides of the Canal with the heartics good will. If we mistake not we recognized Mr Baxendale, late of Pickford and Co., and now outdoor director of the London and Birmingham Railway. Indeed at one time or other of the morning we were gratified to find that a large number of the most extensive undertakings in the kingdom were represented, so t') speak, on this grand occasion, by some of the most respectable individuals connected with them. jr We may remark here that a majority ol the most respectable and well informed persons who were pre- sent this morning, beheld these masnificent Docks for the first time; and the splendid workmanship which they exhibited, was the general theme, ol observation. \Ve heard several gentlemen who have seen other similar works in various parts of tile world, remarking that they had never before beheid any tiling at all ap- proaching this in the general style of execution. In short, we should think it impossible the masonry could be excelled. During the whole morning the bands stationed on each side of thc Canal played a succession of lively airs; answering each other from the opposite sides in the most delightful manner. The weather, which had been wet and showery till six o'clock, but from that time had been particular!, favourable for this grand display, again became some- what utipropitious,—^a lIod deal of drizzling rain de- scending for the succeeding tvvo or three hours. About a quarter past 8. his Lordship, however, proceeded from the further awning to the one fronting the inner gates; and a good many ladies also availed themselves of its shelter. Amongst them we observed Lady Charlotte Guest, who, with Sir John, conversed for sometime with the Noble Marquess. On the western side of t)teLockanumherofprivatecarriases were (Irawn up, crowded with the youth, beauty, and rank of the surrouul\lug I\cthb(}urhood; all of whom ap- peared to enjoy the sight of the passing of the ships from one part of the Locks to another, very consider- ably. At half-past eight the Inner Lock was opened, and the Celerity entered immediately; her yard arms man- ned, her colours streaming, and Mr John Lloyd giving the time for the cheering, waving an immense branch of olive, and seeming to excite every body, by the ex- uberance of bis own buoyant cheerful spirits- The Nau- tilus then took the Celerity in tow, and proceeded some distance up the Canal. We ought to mention that just as the Laily Char- lotte steamer was on the point of starting for the up- per part of the Lock, Lady Charlotte Guest stepped on one of the paddle boxes; and Captain Howells gave the word-" I hree cheers for Lady Charlotte. It was matter of debate whether the honour was in- tended for tlie fair lady, or the steamer, from the similarity of the name; but the joke produced three such deafening shouts, that the two may well share the honours between then),and each still have a super- abundance. This little incident produced a good deal of merriment; and no Wonder; for the vast asscm- blage were exactly in the humour to enjoy a joke, however floor or, indeed, to fancy that everything that occurred was for their peculiar gratification. In short, since the opening of Loudon Bridge, we never remember to have seen so orderly, so good-humoured, and so respectable,—in every sense of the word,—a crowd. Another grand salute followed the entrance of the two Lady Charlottes. We ought to mention that many of the Directors of the Bristol Steam Navigation were 011 board, at the moment of entering the large Basin amongst whom were the Mayor of Cardiff; Sir. J.-J. Guest, Bart., M.P.; Mr. Lunell, &c., &e. Tue Marquess of Bute, and the major part of the company, now proceeded half-way up the Canal to another awning, to witness the commencement of the aquatic sports. III the mean time, the whole body of Odd Fellows, amounting, we believe, to up- wards of eig-ht hundred, returned along the rOild, which will be skirted by the Taff Vale Railway, to Cardiff, preceded by a very excellent band of music. Nothing could exceed the exemplary, orderly, and yet enthusiastic appearance of this body. With their sashes, bells, flags, banners, symbols, and music, they formed a very interesting spectacle as they moved along in the most excellent order. The Boat itaeiiig now commenced. The sailing match was deferred on account of the wind being un- favourable. The Noide Marquess stayed to see the first race only, between six ships' boats, with four rowers each and a steersman j and the well-sustained exertions of the crews for the mastery. The race being concluded the procession immediately returned to the town. Arrived at the junction of the new and old Canal, the Marquess of Bute entered his carriage, which was waitill for his Lordship on the bridge; but as soon as it had turned into St. Mary Street, the enthusiasm of the populace burst forth; the horse« were removed, and the crowd drew the carriage up to the Castle door with ropes. The only accident we witnessed, occurred just as the carriage of the Marquess of Bute was turning out of BIh Street; when one poor man stumbled, and one of the wheels passed over his arm. 1 he Noble Lord, immediately on bearing of the accident, with his ac- customed benevolence of disposition, desired Mr Stockdale to see that every attention was paid him. Having now brought our narrative down to the re- turn of the Noble Lord to Ids Castle, we must break off for the present; adding only that previous to enter- Ing-, Ills Lordship paused 011 the steps, bowed repeat- edly to the assembled thousands, brieflv but inaudibly expressed his acknowledgements of their enthusiasm, and then retired. Wednesday Evening. Having witnessed the return of the procession to the Castle, as described in our previous despatch, our next employment was to retraced our steps to the docks, to ascertain the issue of the racing. 1 he lollowing are the results, commencing with the one already mentioned, which the procession had wailed to wit- IICSS nOAT RACES. First rowing match, between four-oared ships'boats Memnon (Mullens). 1st Prize oC3 3 0 Ann (Bnshen) 2nd do 2 2 0 Celerity (\Vi||i:lms) .(-d do I I 0 Sylph (Hughes) 4th 0 0 0 Brunswich (Courtnev) /)th 0 II 0 Wellington (Evans) ..Gib I) 0 0 Rowing match between two-oarerl wherries. Cupid (Hancock) 1st Prize £ 1 I 0 Spitfire (Tain I in) 2nd do 0 10 0 (,ol S:kil- ilo 0 0 0 Sw,tllow ,lot st:irt Match between four-oared when ies. Spitfire (Tandill) 1st Prize £ 0 5 0 Swallow (Charles) .,21111 do. 3 (I Cupid (Hancock) 3rd do 0 0 0 Corsair (Morgan) .41I1 do 0 0 0 Sculling Match. 7 G 211(1 (lo. () 5 0 Lady Charlotte (Parlitt) 3rd do 0 2 6' Mary Ann (Pearu) .4th do 0 0 0 Ariel (Wheeler) .5th do 0 0 0 Match between the beaten wherries. Cupid (Hancock) .1st Prize ^0 S 0 Corsair (Morgan).2nd do () S () There being no wind, the pilot boats did not start; but they will sail some other day. Five shillings were paid to each boat to compensate for their temporary disappointment; and the beaten boats also had a slIIall remuneration for their exertions; which, though un- successful, they richly deserved; having contributed not a little to the gratification of the crowd, by the excellent sport every one of them had displayed. The banks of the Canal were more or less crowded during the whole of the day. DINNER AT THE CARDIFF ARMS. CaidifT, 1 hursday Morning. The grand dinner to the Marquess of Bute was given last night at the Cardiff Arms Hotel. The Mayor of Cardiff,—Charles Crofts U illiams, F.sq.,— most ably presided 011 the occasion. Mr Beece, surgeon F.S.A., officiated as Vice-President. The Marquess of Bute sat on the right of the Chairman, and Lord James Stuart 011 his left. Nearly three hundred noblemen and gentlemen sat down to dinner; amongst whom were the fol!owin! Viscount Adare, M.P.; Sir J.J. Guest, B,,irt. iki.P.; Charles Morgan, Ksq., MP.; Sir John Morris; Captains Armstrong. Craufurd, Dea- .con, Fisher, Howells, Smyth, and Wardc; Thomas Dennison, Ksq American Coiisul, Bristol; the Che- valier de Mascaronhas, Portuguese Consul General, Bristol; Harman Visgcr, Ksq., French Consul, Bristol; the lion, and Rev. T. 'I racey; the Rev. Messrs. Robert Knight; W. Lister; H.Richards; T. Stacey; n. P.Thomas, A herd are; J. H. Thomas, Pelltyrch; John Montgomery Trahernc; Webb, Vicar of Cardiff; Dr. Moore; Samuel Anderson, Ksq; T. W. Booker, Esq.; Robert Beaumont, Ksq.; Jl, VV. Beere, Esq.; Mr William Bird; Mr John Bird; W. Cubit, Esq Mr Dyke; D. Pavies, J<sq.; Evan David, Esq, William Davics, Mr Dtvwe, (Comptroller Customs); Edward Evans, Esq. Mr Evans; F. Fredricks, Esq. Foster, Esq H. J. Grant, Esq Howell Gwynn, Esq R. Gibson, Esq.; Jeston H0111- fray, Esq.; Summers Harford, Esq.; Richard Hainlvn, Hsq. Lieut- Houian Mr C S. Irvine Richard Jellkills, Esq John Jenkins, Esq.; It. O. Jones, Esq.; Henry Jones, Esq.; William Jones, Esq.; Mr David Jones W. L. lvecne, E-q. j James Levvis;Ksq.; John Lloyd, Esq George Lockett, Esq. ol London; Lewis Morgan, Esq Henry Morgan, Esq. Geo. Overton, Esq J. Bruce Pryce, Esq.; S. Padley, Esq.; Thomas Powell, Esq.; Griffiths Phillips, Ksq K. P. Richards, Esq.; James Russell, Esq.; John Russell, Esq.; Ge0. Turnbull, Esq W111. Thomas, Esq. Mr Robert Thomas Mr Richard I'redwin Nash Edwards Vaughan, Esq.; James Vaughan, F.sq.; Henry Vaughan, Esq W. Watson, Esq.; Hemy Williams, Esq John Wood, Esq.; Mr William VVatkins. The cloth lmving been withdrawn, and grace sai:l by the Vicar of Cardiff, The MAYOR rose and said, that it was one of the good old customs handed down to us by our ancestors, after all public dinners, first, to show our loyalty and attachment to the throne by drinking the health of the Sovereign. At present, vve have so fair, so young, so amiable a female wielding itssceptre, 1 am sure you will drink the health I am about to mention with enthusiasm,—" Our Gracious Majesty the Queen." Three times three cuthusiactic cheers, and one cheer more. Air, — "God save the Queen." The MAYOR rose again and said,—Having drunk the health of the reigning Sovereign, 1 will now propose we do that of the Queen Dowager, who, from her Ilrst landing on th -se shores, has by the kindness of her manners, her amiable disposition, and her very many, many virtues, endeared herself to the nation, and is beloved and respected by tl I. 'I'lio health of the Queen Dowager, and the other branches of the Hoyal :Family." The Mayor was so repeatedly interrupted 111 the course of this speech, with such deafening cheers, that it was with great difficulty we could catch the few sentences we have put down. Nothing could excced the enthusiasm with which the toast was received; and when a stray hiss or two were heard from some individual at the lower end of the room, who was foolish enough to fancy, we suppose, that the eu- thusiasm was uncalled for, the cheers were so voci- ferously renewed, and so long continued, that we hardly expected the Chairman would find an opportu- nity to finish his remarks. When, however,at length, he was able to announce the Queen Dowager's health, coupled with that of the Royal Family, the cbeerihg was again renewed so heartily, that nine times nine, and one cheer more, could we have counted them, would have fallen far short of the actual number. Tlw clwerin llavill at length subsided.the Mayor again rose, and spoke to the lollowing effect. At no very remote period, and, I believe, in the me- mory of some present, nearly every nation iu Europe had been the scene of war, and suffered the privation and dcsolation attelldin it, I-low thankflll oulIt we to be to that Divine Providence, which has given to our Aruiv and Navy, the great bulwarks of the nation, the courage and the power to have preserved these shores from foreign aggression and to have allowed our families to have remained by our hearths in secu- rity' Their prowess and their valour are recorded iu history, and will long be read with praise and exul- tation by Englishmen. — "The Army and Navy." Great cheering- "The Grenadiers' March," and "Rule Britannia." The company joined so heartily in the latter, vve may indeed tiust that, as long as the brave liearts' of those wlw were present, beat, •'Britons never shall be slaves. Captain FISHEH* IV.N., said, it FELL to bis lot to return thanks for this toast but it was utterly im- possible for him to find language adequate to the occasion. He would therefore bespeak their kindness for the. feeble manner in which he should return thanks He well knew the kindness of his countrymen towards the profession to which he had the honour to belong. It had been said that the country had not lately been in such a situation as to call for its active services; but it was in the recollection of many, that these services had shone forth in the most conspicuous man- ner, and should they ever again be required, they would not be wanting in testifying their devotion to this country, and loyalty to the Sovereign they would do their duly to both. (Cheers.) With these feelings he hoped he might express his admiration at seeing oil this day the opening of that port. He was satisfied it would at once prove important to the Navy and to tin? country. "c c°uhl not look upon it as important to the town alone, but to the public at large. After eulogising the fluh'ic spirit of the Noble Marquess, and aain thallkin them for the honour they had done the Navy he sat down. TLIO MAYOH shortly afterwards rose and sai.J.- The "ext. « • — tlie distinguished Nobleman now on my right, the .representative of the crown ill this county, and who has honoured us with his company this day as our guest. We are met here, gentlemen, to shew our re- spect and regard for the Noble Lord, not only for his public conduct, but for his private worth. In the situation I am this day placed by the kindness of my friends, and justly proud as I ought to be of it, yet to me it has one alloy—fearing I should not be able in language sufficiently expressive to acknow- ledge the debt of gratitude the inhabitants of this town and neighbourhood, owe to that noble individual. Had I the eloquence of a Burke, an Erskjne, or a Brougham, I. shoud still fall very far short in being able to men- tion with tile effect it deserves, the many acts of his kindness and beiievolonce-iiis enterprising spirit, and iiis energy. Let us look at this tOWII now, and com- pare it to what it was some few years ago—and en- quire to whom arc we indebted for most of its "public works, and its many improvements] Who was it that opened IJis Barolliid lIall at a grand national festival, held ill this town some few years ago. presided on the occasion, and took the opportunity of a feIV pounds Iwing over its expenditure,to propose the giving it towards the building of an Infirmary; and, with a munificent donation of his own, Scarcely equalled-rouscd the dormant spirit of the neighbour- hood, and has caused the erection of that excellent in- stitution ? The noble Lord. To whom, also, in- debted for the gift of a valuable piece of ground for the erection of a pnuli, School; and also a liberal do nation towards its erection; and a still more liberal annual subscription towards its stil)[)i)rt who also, ever mindful of tho interests of the ris- ing generation, and wishing to inculcate in them the love of literature and science, has established a literary society and museum? To whom, again, are we indebted for those splendid and mag- nificent Docks!—the ceremony of the first ship entering, which we have this day witnessed; and from the numerous and large concourse of specl-iters pre- sent, the splendid procession, and the enlivening music from the different bands, will, 1 am sure, be long re- membered by us all. These Docks, gentlemen, having been constructed with all the conveniences the inge- nuity of man could devise, will enable us to transport the treasures of our hills to foreign climes; iiiii -,ti-c-, independent of the benefit this county,—nay, the country at large mustderive from them,—-of such mag- nitude, and executed in such an excellent manner, as to be the largest, the most costly, of any public work ever commenced,— and, gentlemen, let me tell you. complete I by a single individual in Great Britain. I could go Oil until midnight in relating other acts of his generosity and public spirit, and his care of, and charities to the poor, by whom he is beloved and pleasing as it would be to me to relate, and to you to listen, yet, iu his presence, 1 will say no more. (Then turning to the Noble Lord, Mr Williams continued,) Mav long life, and all worldly happiness attend you.— (ientlemen, I give you "The health of the Marquess of Bute." The toast was received with enthusiastic and long continued cheers; the band playing the Glamorgan- shire March. The Marquess of BUTE then rose, and was received with such immense applause, that it was a considera- ble time before his Lordship was allowed to proceed. When at length lie commenced his address, his feel ings almost overpowered him; and, indeed, several times in the course of his speech, he was unable to proceed. This but gave so many more opportunities for the, display of the heartlelt gratitude and en 11 thusiasin of the assembly, whose feelings were raised to the utmost pitch of excitement: and we must con (ess that no inconsiderable share was irre;;istab!v communicated to ourselves, despite our efforts to re serve ourselves only for noting the words which might fall from his Lordship; and consequently,we arc hot too conscious that our slight sketch will fall lar tdiorl of doing: justice to his Lordship's speech. As near as we could catch the import, his Lordship spoke as follows: Mr Mayor, my Lords, and (Ji-nth incn, 1 must he utterly at a loss to thank yon for the over- whelming kindness with which you have drunk -nn health. °The occasion on which you have hail the goodness to invite me as your guest, I am pr md to acknowledge is peculiar. But is not on the occasion of this day* only, that the kindness of the town of Cardiff and tlte counly of Glamorgan has been she wis me- for vou whenever in tie course «,f in, life I have appeared before in public, that kindues. has not been peculiar, but uniform. (Immense cheeriM" whicu lasted foi a consideia,>le time. When the Noble Loiil obi-aineu a hearing again, he was evidently very much moved; he said,) — I think really "he must he less than man who would not feel considerable difficulty in addressing you under these circumstances,—'(hong and enthusi- astic clieers )-lien one's own acts have been so largely alluded to. If I had merely got up and re- turned thanks, yQu might have said I had not rendered that return to which you are entitled. The manner in which the Mayor has introduced me to yoqr notice, h. is the ground most agreeable to me for I am billing ti) Idicve it is the ground of duty on which I have acted, while in the construction of the Oorks 1 have endeavoured to benefit this place. It is kn ,vn t ) most of the company present, thai at an early perio I of liti I had the honour of being appointed by my Sovereign the Lord Lieutenant of this county, and it then became my duty to consider how I could best pro- mote its interests- It vas not my wisfi io conlitieiny services to this corner alone; and I may trust those gen- tlemen who are present from other parts of the county admit that 1 have always endeavoured to shew my wil- lingness to promote its interests, by the kindness and attention with which they lune received in". (Hear, hear and cheers.) I have not been permitted to pay attention so entirely to the atl'airs of this county as I could have desired, by circumstances which also do not permit me to reside so mll"¡ among you as I should wish to dn. In endeavouring to consider how the great natural advantages Provillelce has bestowed on this county could lie best appllell to benefit it, it seemed not dillicuit to foresee that the time was not fardistaot when this place would he called upon to take a far larger part in the trade and commerce of this nation, than it has yet been called to do (Great cheering.) I considered at what point the port of Cardilf could be most improved; and the more I en- quired, all agreed that this point of the coast,-—the Eastern Hollows, — at which the Ship Canal is now formed, was the most proper for its construction. (Cheers.) I have this satisfaction, that when t ap- plied to Parliament for an Act to enable me to form this il,)ck,-a it occa.i ion on which my arts were pretty rigidly scruinized.-aIl. concurred that this was the point at which the opening ought to be made. With such opinions before me as those of the gentlemen upon whose advice I acted, I arrived at this deter- minatiun, anll 011 it I acted. I will state it in one sentence, and then condude :-Bcing satisfied that this was the proper point at which to commence ope- rations, I was determined that the interests of this place should not be sacrificed, by allowing this port to be constructed at any other. I have never doubted the wisdom of the advice I received, nor of Its success and upon that I have acted, The Noble Lord sat down amidst long continued cheers. His lordship shortly afterwards rose again and said Mr. Vice President, I have obtained the permission of the Chairman to propose the next toast: I have now the honor to propose the health of our friend in the chair,—Mr. Williams, the Mayor of Cardiff. He has many claims on us all: I allude to the business of this day. I may venture to express an opinion, that I never saw an occasion on which a public matter so far depended on the Mayor of the Town, so well arranged. (Hear, hear, and cheers.) As Chairman of this meeting I separate him from the rest of the gentlemen who have acted with him onthe committee: and as Mayor of the Town I may separate him from the other Members of the Corporation. (Cheers) If there be one circumstance more agreeable to me than another, in the invitations which he so kindly took. charge of, it is that of requesting those gen- tlemen who are employed by many nations to loll watch over their commercial affairs, to meet me on the present occasion. I am sure it must be no less gratifying to you all to see so many Consuls of other Powers present I must make a particular allusion to the kindness and liberality of the Captain of the American ship. Upon application made to me a month ago stating that the Manlius would arrive shortly, I arranged that we should bring in the Manlius to day. The Captain in the hatulsoinr-st manner sent word two days ago he would be happy to follow any British ship, of any siz.e, into the Dock. (Cheers ) I have departed from the toast by alluding to the arrangements ot the day, but 1 could sCtlrcelv Z, do otherwise.—" The Mayor" Three times three", and one cheer more. Air —" Of a noble race was Shenkin." The MAYOR then rose and said,The enthuisnstic manner, which by your plaudits you have responded to the blattering language of the Noble Lord, is indeed to me most gratifying, and calls forth my most grateful acknowledgments. Truly do 1 now tender them to you As self is so dangerous a subject to dwell on, you must excuse my brevity; but be assured, your kindness will never be effaced from my memory. T. W. BOOKER, Esq., rose to propose the next toast; and his rising was the sigual for the most deafening cheers: after thinking the company for which, he said that he had risen by the desire of the worthy Chairman, to offer thfin a toast, and the one with which he had the high honour of being entrusted, lie well knew required no observations from him to recommend it to their rapturous reception. My Lords and Gentlemen, said lie, there is one,—and that one a I;i(iy,-iiot more ennobled by birth and exalted by rank, titan she is by the cxcmplary exercise of every virtue that can dignify and adorn her sex She is ab- sent from us to-day, and from a cause which wo all deeply deplore, (louti cue^s}; [JUt though absent from us, of this I am very sure, that her heart has followed her Noble Husband, and that it is here with him and with us during this most interesting celebration I ive you" The health, the better health of tij,, Marchioness of Bute." -Loud and long continued cheers, and S times 3. The Marquess of BUTE again rose, and said, I thank you most sincerely for the maimer in which yon have received Lady Bute's health; and pardon "me for expressing my thanks to Mr Booker for the very kind manner in which he has introduced it. Thpro was no circumstance Ladv Bute had looked forward to with more hope than to be present at theopening of the Uock. This ha3 been denied her by a visitation she could not but submit to,—a visitation from which I trust she derives benefit. It will be impt-rativc on me to tell her what fell from Mr Booker to-day, and bow it was received by every one present. (Cheers). AIT,-fl Scotch song-. The Vice President, MR Reeck, rose and said I have much pleasure in proposing the health of a noblcmau, known to most of us from his vouth, and for whom all of us havo the highest esteem;" and I feel greyer pleasure in proposing his health 011 account of t!,i.« joy.'ul occasion, when lie is come anion* us to w tness the opening ol the splendid undertaking be^un and completed by his most noble and cnterprizhu? brotherLord James Stuart." Three times three, aud one cheer more. Lord JAMES SWART then rose, when the cheers w re gatn renewed tor a considerable period. His Lordsl ip said, in tendering III- warmest acknowledg- ments and thanks for the honour they had now con- ferred upon him, he felt the reception with which they had favoured liiin, notwithstanding an absence ofmnnV years, called for more than ordinary thanks. Not- withstanding the diffidence he felt i„ expressing his feelings he was truly and deeply impressed with the- kindness m which they had received him. On any occasion it would have been matter of pleasure '„o find himself in the town Cardiff, where, ill former days he had been so kindly treated. He left them to m a'nne h.s delight now, vvheu he was there to celehrrlt au event of such importance to Cardiff. But, al- though, said he, perhaps trenching on that which pro- perly belongs to others, I cannot restrain myself- re'snin Ur- |b°- ''U,.0'TWr in judgement;—1 cannot w'u v a,iration for the work which my fle"d and Relative has completed;—a work ;Wi,ei lie has commenced and achieved iu tho sunt space of five years. When I see the; vast expenditure, and the immense risk incurred for tho advancemeutof the town and county, I eolifesst eannot reshain myself from expressing what I feci nil this occasion. I cannot overlook the fact that there are lew individuals in this eountry. and HOIK il) anv other who hav, attempted to carry on such nuundcrtaking alone. Tue Duke of Bridgwater's canal, constructed some 70 or 8j years ago, is the only parallel ill this country. You will make due allowance for the feet-. ings ol a brother when I stvie tLi,ll;itioi).,il .vi)rk- for liiii also carried away by the desire of the advance- ment of the honour, and the position of Hbunor shire among the otheT counties;ilKl it is ill(](,(.(1 advanctug last. I once more express the plea- sure and gratifioaWm 1 have in fiodin. that tiiou^f, absent from you > not forgotten; ancl I shaH offer you once more wy warmest thallk, t,V out, tluu Was with no utile ddlieulty vve couhs eaten the tenour of his remarks 4rr,-—"Should aiild acrpi-atiitauce be forgot; whkf, 1 "Tlte Hight Hev. the nisllOl vvhenV'1 VV Krili thanks He sail fir more »KI it >nu'' 1;uu saw maur gentlemen lieartv m m 6 ^an t0 respond tii-the kind unci If it wp-n nei" ln, had received the toast., nip, r ^orf>ea'Jie to them lo he psesent at good! deeih •-e!i A" exPreSs .tlleir adrogation of noble: » am noble natures, it was an additional gratil'i- t(^ 11 ^mt.liieir humble names were not loa* it 'i'1 1 Diocesan and his brethren, a.cgv, he begged to lhauk them most heartih; i.° ie '^iciliau Mariner's Hymn. tie MAYOR nave, The Members for the Couriy one of whom, Lord Adare, lie was most pleased »>set* at the C'-rejiony this morning. (Cheers.) (, f (1 ,ai-ch of the Men of Glamorgan." Lord ADAKE thanked lliem most sincerely for the- honour of driaking his health- To what feeling could he attrhtlte it, save tha" uch occasions the- nwm, hers for the county shouh] not be absent. It would have been matter of paihfù: regret to him, if any thing- had hindered his being present. Any one Wltl. rejoiced at the success of private enterprize wouht have been sorry to have been absent. He was not there from curiosity, but t ) honour the nobleman who. had completed the gigantic undertaking, the opening of which they had met to celebrate. Pt the Govern- ment of any country had accomplished it, tlie whole nation would bave responded. How tuugb more when

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