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IN common with the rest of the Principality, and indeed with the greater part of the Church throughout the land, which, has spoken out strongly in deprecation of the heavy blow threatened to the Church in Wales, by depriving it of one of its Bishops, we would earnestly exhort our readers to the adoption of the measures pro- posed, in order to the reversal of that particular Clause in the Bill. That such a reversal will be granted to the prayers of the Church, who can doubt, if they be united and general—especially as the object of the Bill in question (under which the Ecclesiastical Commissioners are already working out many valuable alterations in matters relating to the Church), is simply to give the Church greater efficiency, partly by adapting its resources to the increasing wants of the body, partly by making such arrangements as the geographical position of the different Dioceses, the population, &c., would seem to require.— We freely confess it to be our opinion that much good has been done, and may ever be looked for, by increasing the number of Dioceses, and consequently adding to that body of men, the Bishops, from whose more frequent and immediate presence, and more intimate acquaintance with the Clergy and Church in general, we derive our best hopes of its speedy restoration to former influence and usefulness. But we cannot expect these results, if, according to the present intention of the Bill, the Dioceses of Bangor and St. Asaph are to be united—on the contrary we can imagine no measure moie calculated to discourage the Clergy, and to retard the now onward progress of the Episcopal Church in Wales, than the accomplishment of this purpose. We think it our duty, therefore, to call upon the Diocese of Llandaff to petition in favour of her old British sister of the North, endeared to her by every tie that can bind one Church to another. We copy from an influential London Paper a word of good advice on this subject, so interesting. to every Briton :— The friends of efficient Episcopal supervision in the Church of England will have read with attention the adver- tisement announcing the circulation of Petitions to Parlia- ment for the repeal of so much of the Act of 6 and 7 Will. IV., c, 77, as provides for the suppression of one of the two Bishoprics in North Wales. We cannot use terms more strongly recommending attention to the subject than do the words of the advertisement:—" It is earnestly hoped, that all "members of the Church will exert themselves to maintain the British Episcopate in its present integrity." The petitions, we understand, will lie for signature at the houses of several booksellert- in the parish of Marylebone, and will hardly be neglected by genuine and conscientious members of the Church." WHILST the Citizens of London are, as a, facetious Prebendary has it, laying their heads together on the subject of Wooden Block Pavement—and the Press is assisting in the ligneous and anti-ligneous controversy, the Citizens of Cardiff are beginning to discover that dirt is a nuisance, and that drains are essential to public health, We shall not fail to quicken their apprehensions in these matters, and to apply the stimulating process whenever we find the Car of Improvement" halting in its progress. We do not exactly expect the "rail-road" speed-but the pace of the Tortoise does not satisfy our requirements. We will now gladly turn for a week, whilst the Scavengers are performing their meritorious duties, to the more agreeable task of recording the exertions now making in the Eastern part of Glamorgan- shire, in the Scotch system of Draining. To these exertions the Lectures of Mr. Smith, of Deanston, at the last great Agricultural Meeting at Bristol, have given a strong impetus. The meed of praise must be given to the. Messrs. Romilly for commencing here this important era in husbandry. Through theh- intelligent Farm Bailiff, Mr. Fergus, they have reclaimed many hundred Acres in the Parishes of Porthkerry and Barry, which four or five years ago were almost worthless, but which now produce heavy crops of Corn. Mr. David, of Radyr Court, and Mr. Watson, of St. Nicholas, (the Chairman and Deputy Chairman of the Cardiff Farmers' Club) have well followed up this useful example, and we couldf, name some Landlords who, at their own cost, are drain-" ing fields for their Tenants, equal to more than 10 per cent, (in some instances 20 per cent.) upon their rental. Their names ought to be had in remembrance, for their example is worthy of all imitation. Mr. Homfray, in Lisvane, Sir George Tyler and Mr. Bassett, in Boulston, Mr. Bruce Pryce, in St. Nicholas and St. Lythan's, Mr. Clive, in St. Fagan's, Mr. Fothergill, at Hensol, Mr. Williams, at Roath, and other Landed Proprietors, whose names do not immediately occur to us, are now employ- ing numerous Workmen in Draining, to the great advantage of their own Property, and to the immense benefit of the otherwise unemployed poor. It is in fact as a means of furnishing the industrious poor with occu- pation in this unexampled time of want of employment, that we strenuously and respectfully urge upon the Landed Proprietors generally the adoption of the plan we have named. If virtue were in this instance its own reward, there would be stimulus enough for Christian philanthropy, for they who employ the poor not only give bread to the hungry, but they do better, they enable the poor to earn it-and far sweeter to the poor man is the food of labour than the food of charity. But it fortu- nately happens that the employment of the poor in the improvement of the soil, if conducted with judgment, as in the cases we have named, brings with it a correspond- ing advantage--rather should we say a four-fold advantage to the employer. Let the system of Draining, sub-soil Ploughing, and Top Dressing be freely carried out, and the effect will be, not only of increasing the produce of Corn per acre, but also of rendering the Land fit for a variety of other Crops. But we are not about to deliver to Landlords and Tenants, far better acquainted than we are with the subject, a Lecture on Agriculture- an attempt scarcely less foolish than that of the Philosopher, who lectured Hannibal on the Art of War- our aim and end has been to encourage, by reference to successful examples, the employment of a portion of our t industrious population for which there is no immediate occupation employment that is twice blessed—blessing him that gives and him that takes-filling the Garners of the one with all manner of store, and the humble Cottage of the other with food and contentment; rescuing the property of the one from tHe curse of sterility, and the whole body of the other from the temptations of want, and the suggestions of despair-the one fulfilling the noblest ends of wealth, the other securing the sweetest rewards of industry. We close these imperfect suggestions with a few practical observations. We would express a hope then that each Landlord, where his Farm is at rack rent, would drain two, three, or more acres, in proportion to the size of the Farm-the Landlord paying for opening and closing, and the Tenant for hauling the stones-or, where stones are not convenient, going to the nearest Depot for the Draining Tiles. In some instances we hear that some of the Landowners (amongst others the Marquess of Bute and Mr. Fothergill) having found the proper clay on their'Estates, intend making their own Tiles, and we have no doubt they will also supply their neighbours. The burden of our song is, increase the produce of your soil by improved cultivation. The first step in this improvement is Drainage, and then follows the use of every assistant which science tested by success- ful experiment has placed at your disposal. You cannot judiciously employ human labour without enriching yo.ur- self-^and unlike the operations in Manufactures, your improvements increase the demand for human labour. It was stated by Dr. Marsham, (the Warden of Mertcn College, Oxford) at a recent Agricultural Meeting in Bucks, that Five Millions of our Northern population eat Oatmeal, and Five Millions of the Irish lived on Potatoes. We hope to live to see the day when good wholesome Wheaten Bread shall form the more substantial food of the Scotch and Irish Labourer—and this blessing will be placed better and speedier within their reach bv adopting the advice of Mr. Gladstone, the father of the accom- plished Vice President of the Board of Trade, with whose words we conclude—for they are words both of encouragement and advice "I think before 1843 expires we shall see considerable improvement in the value of both corn and cattle therefore, in my opinion, the landlords will justly require to have more experience before they enter seriously on the consideration of the permanent reduction of rents under existing leases but let me humbly advise and recommend to them forbear- ance in pressitig for payment, whilst depression continues and, on the other hand, let me exhort all farmers who study their own interest, to devote their attention to improve their cultivation, by strict attention to rotation of crops, by adopt- ing the use of the subsoil-plough, and extending their thorough-drainage, which, with the use of bone-dustfor their green crops, will cause, I am persuaded, an increase of pro- duction, iikely to exceed even their most sanguine expecta- tions and with increased protection afforded by these means against the seasons, whilst it will enable them, in benefiting themselves, to give employment to many of the labouring poor, of which they at present stand much in need." qp THE Northern Division of our Principality is adopting the most active measures to remove the stigma which attaches to Wales, of taking no thought for the Insane Poor, and of being hitherto utterly destitute of any Asylum for their comfort or relief. The Subscriptions (including a grant of Land from a benevolent gentleman) amount to £ 5,000—a sum which authorises the Com- mittee to use the language of congratulation, and to safely anticipate the accomplishment of so desirable an object as the Erection of a Public Hospital for Pauper Lunatics. We have, on more than one occasion, invited public attention to the same end in South Wales-the Population of which greatly exceeds that of the North, and its claims upon public sympathy are still more numerous and urgent. Amongst our Landed Proprietors it will not be difficult to find another Joseph Ablett, (who has given a site consisting of 20 Acres of Landj and amongst the Transmuters of Metal, the true Alchymists, because the only successful ones, the Merchant Princes of Glamorganshire and of the adjoining Counties, whose hearts are as liberal as their wealth is boundless ;-one noble effort would, we are persuaded, open a stream of benevolence that would rival the fabled Pactolus, leaving our Northern neighbours far "astern," but leaving them still the honourable distinction of setting a good example. The most affecting of all our Master's Miracles was that by which at a word he controuled demoniac frenzy-the most touching of all spectacles was that when the maniac, once fierce, naked, and in chains, was seen sitting at the feet of his Saviour, clothed, and in his right mind. Let us do good accord- ing to our power, Let us employ the wealth which God has given us in providing an Asylum for the most pitiable of all sufferers-and directing the investigations and labours of Medical Science into the noblest of all chan- nels, the ministration to minds diseased—the recovenjisof the stricken intellect, the restoration to light and life of those whose dwelling is comparatively among the tombs." THE resistance of France and America to what is called in Diplomacy the Right of Search, is but another mode of perpetuating the Slave Trade. Under the flimsy dis- guise of a jealousy for national honour lies, we suspect, avarice the most sordid, and cruelty the most heartless, joined to the most miserable pretences, and the most detestable hypocrisy. It were worse than absurd to look at the question in any other light. The Flag of America is prostituted to the vilest of all contraband traffics, denounced by Heaven and civilized Man-a traffic in human flesh-and the abomination is protected because it i covered by imposture. It were as though the Aristocracy of England should combine to protect a member of the swell mob, because he had practised his knavery in the disguise of a gentleman. It is the flag that covers the cargo,"—it is the dress that protects the pickpocket.—Admirable reasoning Who can speak with patience of such absurdities ? The Speech of Lord Brougham, on the first night of the Session, fully exposed the nonsense of Mons. De Toqueville on this subject— whilst he rescued France from the imputation of encouraging, under any pretence, the abominations of the Trade in Slaves. The sincerity of his Lordship's defence of the great nation we do not dispute, though we have very great doubts of the correctness of his opinions. We believe that the real question at issue is, whether or no the Slave Trade shall be utterly abolished, or, whether under some other name, or lurking under some other disguise, it cannot be carried on. Of all the maritime powers Great Britain had need be most jealous of, the Right of Search, but this right she has conceded to the great cause of humanity, and it cannot for a moment be supposed that the reluctance of France or America to follow this great and glorious example arises from national pride.—Why for every French or American Vessel exposed to this ordeal Great Britain has at least ten. No, America is too deeply tainted with this infernal Trade to do right and justice in this matter. The Masters of Slaves," said Mr. Canning, are not to be trus-ted with making Laws upor. Slavery. The Masters of Slaves, we may add, are not likely to step out of their way to join in a proceeding which stamps their own acts with the character of injustice. It is this, her national sin, that makes America insensible to the degradation that her Flag is used to cover iniquity so enormous- dead to the libel upon her reputation, that the worst of Piracies are committed in her name. It is in vain that the Americans boast of their greatness, their refinement, their freedom, and their morality, when every "sixth man is a Slave, whom his fellow men may buy, and sell, and torture." This is the true cause of the opposition to the Right of Search, and not the groundless jealousies of maritime etiquette and national honour. So long as the Right of Search is resisted by France and America, so long will the wholesale iniquity of the Slave Trade flourish and abound.

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--TAFF YALE RAILWAY TRAFFIC,

CARDIFF POLICE.—Monday, Feb.…