Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

6 articles on this Page

Advertising

[No title]

Advertising

[No title]

[No title]

News
Cite
Share

Probably a concurrence of disasters, similar to that under which Great Britain now suffers, never before visited the metropolis of a mighty nation. Famed alike for laws, for commerce, and for arms, she now sees, in time of peace, and without either hostile inroad or intestine broils, her palace of legis- lation, her emporium of trade, and her storehous of trophies and of arms, all at one moment in ruinse and each by a like calatuity. I Yet we are not of the number of those who would perinit our spirits to be depressed by these occur- rences. Considering the constant growth of wealth among up, as exhibited by the alacrity with which millions are poured forth whenever the hopes of the cipitaii.t can be excited, %ve cannot speak of tile mere pecuniary losses involved in these conflagra- tions as of much momenl in so vast an accotiiit that of the British nation. Feelings of deepe regret arise from the recollection of the relics of antiquity which are sure to be lost in every such f overthrow. In the rnin of the Armoury at the Tower, our deprivation is pi-ohably the greatest, at- though in a mrrply pecuniary point of view probabiv the burning of the Houses of Pariiament and that of the Roval'K*cbange inflicted, each of them, a greater loss on the nation. The prevailing is that of vexation just as a man laments the carelessness by which he has allowed his mother's- picture, or his father's ring, to escape from him. It is not the money value—it is the impossibility of replacing the lost relics, that inflicts the pain. It may be thought to partake of the carefulness which shuts the stable door after the steed is stolen, if we ask, whether such calamities as these are really unavoidable? and whether we ought to make up our minds to hear of the conflagration of some great national treasure every five or ten years, as a thing that must be f But the question is not yet too late; for, great as our losses have been, what remains to us is of still higher value. Windsor, Hampton Court, the Bri- tish Museum, the Cathedrals, &c., are each one of them more precious than either of the treasures lost in the last seven years. I Are these calamines, then, unavoidable? we aill ask. Would not the course taken by ar ( private person, anxious to preserve such a pas- J sion, be something of this kind—a trusty se 'es- or two dividitjlr the iii-.ht, carefully J)eriAer- rvaut, the interior of such a building duri- oulating ui)occtiv)ied I)oiirs? all it, Conflagrations of this awful kitid in a moment. Hours eliip-e, (lur; jrenot kindled is gaillitig its hold, befoi-e ever .g which the fire out can receive any alai-fli. lie walelimell "ith- visiting each part of the bu: But a careful person would surely detect !h%t6P Idiug once in each hour, possession.scliiel* before it had gained To this sug-grstifW answered, that we are aware that it may be offices wholly experience of the great insurance them it a, «' -ontradicts this theory; that with a hi,l ,Lr ¡'a" It', ga'hered from experience, to charge v I e e of illsnrallce for buildings in whicn a w'itho'' >vaicbman is kept, than for those left .( ,t any such safeguard. is not safe to disregard such a hint as this rule %res. It cannot prove that it would not have been jetler for the public, had there been a resident I warder keenincr wnlrll in thp Tnwpr oil Salurdav r e n .,I nig-ht. But it may suggest another caution—tha( such watchmen, if kept loo long on such duty, ma gr< w sllJgish, and useless and may even crea!cJ the danger they are intended to avert. Wiihout conceding, therefore, that it could have been the wisest plan t.o leave the Aimoury as it was Illefr on Saturday last., we may acid to itie propoltal, for a!l our rem.uinin.tf public buildings, of a nightly watch within the h'juse, ttie further recommendation — that they beaciive, prudent, trustworthy, middle- aged men; that th.ey be not employed on such duty tor a longer term than two years each and that the inducement held jut to vigilance be, certain promo- iiou at p4e end of their (era) of scrvice,—Jt'wa T N CRIMINAL INFORMATION.—On the first day of term a rnle Niti for a criminal information, was ob- tained at the suit of Sir Alexander C. Grant, M.P., against Mr. Sheehan, editor of a Cambridge paper, and Sir John Milley Doyle, for having attempted to provoke him to a breach of the peace; the one by seudiug, and the other by conveying, what was understood as a hostile message. A MOUNTAIN OF FAT —Bickerstaff, a sheriff of the county of Antrim, died May 12, He was re- puted to be, in all dimensions together, the biggest man in Ireland. He was very nigh six feet tali and so prodigious'y fat, that the skin of his leg-4 cracked more than once with their extraordinary stuffing. The fat of his legs hung far over his shoes, and it was a miracle that his little feet could support the huge body. When he was opened, the fat upon his thorax was found to be uigh six inches deep- the muscles thereon bciug no thicker than a knife- blade, and the cavity of his chest being no larger than that of a child of nine or ten years .old. The fat upon his abdomen was about six inches deep. He had but one kidney, the other being quite perished, almost so as not to be found. He died in tiis 50ih year.— Dublin University Magazine. SICK Roo" AT COLLEGE.—A si(k room at col egs presents a wretched appearance. It is entirely out of character instead of the neat trim look of a don's oomicii or the rackeiyand rickety room of a noisy undergraduate, you see an odd sort of apartment, half kitchen, half apothecary's shop phials, pill boxes: powder papers, broth and gruel saucepans usurp the places usually occupied hy books or bottles. The hired nuiseis an indescribable animal so I will not attempt to describe her. Suffice it to say, she is an old harpy, who befouls everything on which she sets her talons, and is regarded by the scout, the uttached and faithful servant, as all intruder, who means to appropriate to herself those little residuaries that constitute his peculiar per- quisites. They do hate one another most cordially. The poor patient, without a relative near to cheer and comfort him by those little attentions that love alone dictates and supplies, has to listen to the mutual recriminations and accusations that pass between the hirelings, and are wafted to his excited ears through the thin partition which divides his chamber from the scout's closet. Then the stuff ihey give you and call it brotli-heugli It makes me shudder. COAL IN GERMANY.—An important discovery of large strata of coal has been made at Buckow, a small village not far from Berlin. A company has been formed for working the mine, which promises to be so abundant that manufacturers and steam- engines will probably soon be supplied with coal at half its present price. When it is known that the Berlin manufactories employ about 40,000 workmen, the importance of this discovery will be easily understood.— German paper. ANOTHER FEMALE SAILOR.-KIRKWALL (Ork- ney), Oct. 26.—From the unpropitious state of the weather, aud the gloomy prospects of the harvest, we were fast sinking down into a state of almost insanity, when we vrere fast sinking from our torpor by a report that a smart young Irish sailor lad, who had been stealing the hearts of the Scapa girls, had been metamorphosed into a handsome girl! Being auxious to know the truth rf t-IiiL% report, I called on Mr. Smith, cattle-dealer, wbo is a native of Ireland, in whose house it was said the denouement had taken place. ] there saw an in- terestiocf-looking female, of about 17 years of age. The following is her statesdent :-Her name is Eliza Carey, from the north of Ireland. Having pledged her troth to accompany bim who was bred aud brought up with her to America in last summer, oft coming to Londonderry to meet the dear boy who never 11 desaved" her, she found that the vessel had sailed, and he who had never been apart from her since they were "childcr" had gone with the vessel. Distracted with her grief, she took the resolution of following him; and baviugheard there were frequent opportunities of getting to America from the Ork- neys, she laid aside her female attire, cut od her pretty auburn locks, donned the jacket and trousers and engaged as cook in a vessel bound to Orkney for herrings. Before leaving home she imparted her secret to a friend, a poor woman. The vessel's name she sailed in was the Marshall, of London- derry; but she does not recollect the master's name. She was very sick during the passage, to cure her of which the crew plunged her overboard,, having tied a rope round her waist. This clITe, of course she did not much relish, but stood it man- fully. Having arrived in Orkney she left the vessel at Longhope, and came to Stromness, where she failed in getting a ship to take her as a boy. She them took to service, and engaged as a shearer in this, neighbourhood. Here (Kirkwall) carrying on a flirtation with one of the girls, she discovered I,cer sex. Findin,,r her secret kno%ti she came to t -%Vill and gave the above particulars to Mr. Smith, eattl, dealer, who fortunately happens to come from the same part of the country and knows her friends, so that no doubt whatever is emertained of the truth of her extraordinary admission. Her person, despite of exposure \0 the wind and weather, is rather good; is short in stature, with features regular and well defined; she ha; nice dark eyes, wiih lono- [silky eyelashes; a well-formed mouth, containing fa pretty white set of tpeth; alld while telling her tale, especially that part of it where she fell a court- ing hei girls at Seapa, though seemingly a little b,!shfu],her whole countenance was lit into an arch expression of playful humour. A siib,-cril)-io,-i has been set on foot in order to carry her home, but she would much rather go to Philadelphia, in "Amerikay," where she supposes her sweetheart is by this time.-Standard. RAtLWAY SUNDAY LAROUR-Ttve Railway Times savs-" According to the law as it now stands, we feel bound to confess that travelling by railway on Sunday, so far as concerns all employed in the working of the engines and trains, appears to us to be illegal. The exception which has been established by statute in favour 0f stage coachmen, hackney coachmen, and cWtrtr.an, does not. eXTend lo i ail way engine dr lTerg| stokers, guards, porters, fee., who act, therefore, unlawfully in pursuing their ordinary callings on the Sunday."

[No title]